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Greenheart Farms
Discussion id : 67-369
most recent 11 OCT 12 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 7 OCT 12 by OLEF641
Does anyone know WHY Greenheart is renaming the roses they are releasing? This has to be very confusing to the collector, not to mention disrespectful to the original breeder of the rose.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 6 posted 7 OCT 12 by Rupert, Kim L.
It's a common marketing practice, particularly these days. You will find quite a few "synonyms" for roses caused by "marketing" them by various sources. Mint Julep has been offered through promotions and mass catalog producers as "Emerald Dream" and "Emerald Mist". I agree it is frustrating and can be confusing, but it's done in an effort to sell roses which, otherwise, aren't selling in sufficient quantities for them. You could argue that if they made them available to the mail order, retail market, they may sell a few more of them, but that doesn't fit their business model nor staffing levels. Greenheart tried that and it cost them too much money for too few sales.
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Reply #2 of 6 posted 8 OCT 12 by OLEF641
Thanks for the lesson in marketing. It's good that we have resources like HelpMeFind that can clear up confusing things like this.
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Reply #3 of 6 posted 9 OCT 12 by CarolynB
Why would anyone let a name sway them that much in their choice of buying roses? I like having roses with nice names, but that's much less important to me than finding roses which will do well in the conditions my garden offers, and do something positive for the appearance of my garden. Why don't these rose sellers make it part of their marketing policy to educate consumers about features of their roses that people might want, rather than using a name change as a marketing tool?
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Reply #4 of 6 posted 11 OCT 12 by OLEF641
My concern, as a collector, is that old varieties are being re-sold with a new name, making them look like a "new" rose -- imagine someone paying money for several "new" roses, only to find that they already have those plants under their original names -- what a waste of money!

It would also be frustratiing if someone were searching for a certain rose and, because it has been renamed, they were unable to find it. Another frustration.

Luckily, we have HelpMeFind to help us sort out these issues.
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Reply #5 of 6 posted 11 OCT 12 by CarolynB
Those are excellent points. And yes, HelpMeFind is providing a very valuable service in that respect, as well as in other respects.
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Reply #6 of 6 posted 11 OCT 12 by Lyn G
OLEF641

You could very well be quoting Jack Harkness when you write about your concern. This is not a new issue.

In the mid to late 1970s European breeders, which marketed roses in many countries adopted Meilland's use of a breeder code name as the primary domination name for the very reasons you mention in your posts. Using the breeder code name as the primary name allowed the use of more than one marketing or "fancy name" for the rose in several countries.

You can read what he wrote on the subject in his 1978 book, "Roses" page 114, or if you can find a copy of the article he wrote in 1977 for the "Rose Annual", you can see that he addresses these same concerns.

Greenheart Farms does list the breeder code names on their website, even when they do re-name a rose. Some nurseries are not quite so honest and just re-name the rose.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Discussion id : 43-907
most recent 16 MAY 10 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 13 APR 10 by Rosaholic's Southern California Garden
Greenheart/Nor'East is at it again with renaming roses -- here's the latest list of new names they are marketing to big box stores now. See
http://www.greenheartfarms.com/roses/GHF_Availability.pdf

Salmon Vigorosa has become Electric Balconia.
Little Chap has become Hot Pink Balconia.
Sweet Vigorosa has become Neon Balconia.
Raspberry Vigorosa has become Raspberry Balconia.
Toscana Vigorosa has become Toscana Balconia.
Innocencia Vigorosa has become White Balconia.

All of these apparently are being or will be marketed as hanging basket roses to the big box trade this year under the new names. HMF probably should add the new names as "synonyms."
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 16 MAY 10 by HMF Admin
We've enhanced HMF to better handle re-introductions like this and we've added these new names properly.

Thank you !
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