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'Alba Meidiland ™' rose Description
'Alba Meidiland ™' rose photo
Photo courtesy of Kat Lee
Availability:
Commercially available
HMF Ratings:
92 favorite votes.  
Average rating: EXCELLENT.  
ARS:
White, near white or white blend Shrub.
Registration name: MEIflopan
Origin:
Bred by Marie-Louise (Louisette) Meilland (France, 1986).
Class:
Shrub.  
Bloom:
White.  None / no fragrance.  50 to 55 petals.  Average diameter 1.5".  Small, very full (41+ petals), cluster-flowered, in small clusters, in large clusters bloom form.  Prolific, continuous (perpetual) bloom throughout the season.  
Habit:
Medium, spreading.  Medium, glossy, dark green, dense foliage.  
Height of 2' to 5' (60 to 150 cm).  Width of 4' to 7' (120 to 215 cm).
Growing:
USDA zone 4b through 9b.  Can be used for beds and borders, cut flower, garden or ground cover.  Vigorous.  flowers drop off cleanly.  shade tolerant.  Disease susceptibility: very disease resistant.  
Patents:
Australia - Application No: 1991/076  on  21 Aug 1991   VIEW PBR PATENT
Synonym: Alba Meidiland. Applicant: Meilland International. Patent has Expired
 
United States - Patent No: PP 6,891  on  4 Jul 1989   VIEW USPTO PATENT
Application  on  28 Apr 1988
'Meifloplan' Bred by Marie-Louise Meilland, Rosa sempervirens X Marthe Carron. Patent has expired
Notes:
Wayside Gardens says Alba Meidiland is a great improvement over 'White Meidiland' because it self-cleans its old blooms...


An anonymous testimonial: About ten years ago I bought an 'Alba Meidiland' as a ground cover rose. It has, at times, completely blanketed a neighbor's mature Mock Orange and Vitex, with thousands of blooms. After a severe storm, I cut the entire area back and discovered the 'Alba' had self-rooted in numerous areas. I gave away most of the new plants--all as sturdy and floriferous as their parent--and have attempted to keep the remaining plants closer to the ground where, theoretically, they belong. It's a losing battle, I'm afraid, for although they continue to bloom reliably and freely, they appear to want nothing more than to blanket the tops of everything around. Beautiful, yes; reliable, certainly; healthy, definitely; vigorous, an understatement!

One of the Roses that "passed the test" in Longwood Garden's Ten-Year Rose Trials.