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'The Meteor' rose References
Book  (2001)  Page(s) 292.  
 
Early Hybrid Teas. The Meteor (Evans, 1887)
Book  (Apr 1993)  Page(s) 376.  
 
Meteor Hybrid Tea, crimson-carmine, 1887, Bennett. Description.
Article (misc)  (4 Mar 1950)  Page(s) 35.  
 
Meteor (1887) the first [good] red [Hybrid Tea]
Book  (1940)  Page(s) 19.  
 
Henry Bennett, Shepperton, England. 'Meteor'
Book  (1936)  Page(s) 473.  
 
Meteor, The (HT) Evans 1887; velvety dark crimson, lasting, medium size, semi-double, flat, drooping, in clusters of 3-6, fragrance 5/10, floriferous, continuous bloom, growth 6/10, bushy, short. Sangerhausen
Website/Catalog  (1913)  Page(s) 36.  
 
Hybrid Tea Roses.
Meteor
A fragrant, dark, velvety crimson Rose that endures. It flowers constantly upon a strong, vigorous plant, whose foliage is remarkably resistant to mildew. The color is constant and durable, being one of the few dark red Roses that does not rapidly fade. An attractive and modest Rose of intense deep color, soon becoming one of the most loved flowers of the garden. For massing for color effect it presents boundless opportunities. So, too, when planted with lighter-colored Roses, its beauty is enhanced and the color seemingly deepened by the contrast with white, delicate pink, or rose-color, light red or creamy yellow. The amateur is taking no chance in selecting specimens of the Meteor Rose to "help out" with a pretentious planting. The sturdy and strong growth of the bush is not the least of its good qualities, and as it is not in any sense fastidious, it will be found one of the most satisfactory all-round Roses that can be grown.
Magazine  (1913)  Page(s) 42.  
 
Another H.T. of 1887, the Meteor, may be noticed in passing, but need not detain us, nor do we find any other red H.T. ...
Website/Catalog  (1911)  Page(s) 23.  
 
Hybrid Teas. The Meteor. Rich velvety crimson, good form; comstant bloomer; does not open well in wet seasons. Vig.
Magazine  (1906)  Page(s) 265.  
 
In a biography of Robert Simpson, President of the American Rose Society:
Robert Simpson, the new president of the American Rose Society, and a prominent grower of Clifton, N.J., was born at Pocklington, Yorkshire, England....At the age of 21 he came to this country....to Chicago, where he worked for Miller & Hunt....next...to the McCormick establishment at Lake Forest, Ill.,...Leaving there, he went in 1887 to take charge of Evans' place at Rowlandville, Pa., where were introduced the roses Wm. Francis Bennett [ed. note: Bennett, HT, 1886], Meteor, and Mrs. John Laing [ed. note: Bennett, HP, 1887]. Here he was handling the propagation of the two latter varieties. Puritan [ed. note: Bennett, HT, 1886] was another variety brought out at the Evans place.
Book  (1905)  Page(s) 142.  
 
Meteor, Hyb. T.R. (raised by H. Bennett, 1888) Medium size, full, cupped, deep velvety crimson-red, free-flowering till autumn. The flowers are included to become scorched too early in summer. Forced flowers retain their freshness of colour in winter for a week.
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