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'Pallida' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 94-288
most recent 12 SEP SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 5 AUG 16 by Andrew from Dolton
Margery Fish writes in 'A Flower for Every Day' (published by The Gardening Club, 1965). Mrs Fish's garden East Lambrook Manor is in Somerset in the south-west of England:

"My next choice, I think, would be a China rose. We were lucky in finding a healthy China rose beside the door into the garden. There were one of these roses in the first garden I remember, but we always called them "monthly" roses in those days. The flowers haven't the colour, the shape or the strong perfume of Albertine but they bloom in every month of the year. I have picked them at Christmas, and I enjoy the sight of the tree in June when it is covered with blossoms. We prune our old rose drastically and spray it when it is attacked by greenfly, and it remains strong and healthy. I think it must have been grown by our back door for at least a hundred years. A friend in the next village was born in this house, and she is now over eighty and says that the rose was there when her parents came to the house a good many years before she was born".
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Reply #1 of 10 posted 5 AUG 16 by Patricia Routley
Thank you Andrew
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 27 JUN by Andrew from Dolton
'Old Blush' still growing by the door into the garden at East Lambrook Manor. 14/6/17
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Reply #3 of 10 posted 10 SEP by Give me caffeine
Unusual way of growing it.
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Reply #4 of 10 posted 10 SEP by Andrew from Dolton
Possibly it is 'Old Blush, Climbing.'
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Reply #5 of 10 posted 10 SEP by Give me caffeine
Makes sense. I hadn't realised there was a climbing sport. Didn't think of that.
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Reply #6 of 10 posted 10 SEP by Patricia Routley
Andrew, the photos and the references are quite historic. Well done for adding them. Do you think they should be added to the 'Old Blush Cl.' Page? (and have you struck this bush?)
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Reply #7 of 10 posted 11 SEP by Andrew from Dolton
Page, 83 of 'A Flower for Every Day'. Comparing pictures, in the descriptions, I now think this is the bush form. The climber has more singular flowers along is branches rather than clusters like this typically produced by the bush. So, yes, Give me caffeine, it’s an unusual way of growing it. BTW, the description of 'Old Blush, Cl.' Says that it was introduced in 1792, that is a year before the introduction date of ‘Old Blush’ itself of 1793. Is this correct? I wish I had a better picture, my old camera was dying. My own plant of bush ‘Old Blush’ came from David Austin’.
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Reply #8 of 10 posted 11 SEP by Patricia Routley
Old Blush
Bred by Unknown Chinese Breeder(s) (China, before 1793).
Discovered by Parsons (United Kingdom, 1793).

Old Blush Climbing
Discovered by Unknown 1752.

Perhaps not quite correct for the climber.
The operative word for the bush is bred BEFORE 1793 (by a few hundred years I believe)
I can only quote Brent Dickerson in The Old Rose Informant p467. The First Eighteen Chinas. "The dates of import, description, and commercial introduction of many of these early roses vie with each other for citation; they are vague and hard to settle, and sometimes might be called somehing of a legal fiction."
Peter Harkness in Modern Gardening Roses' says 'Old Blush' reached Sweden in 1752. I note this is the same date HelpMeFind has for the discovery of the climber.

I would like to be able to help more on the date for the climber, but just do not have the early source materials. Perhaps others can contribute?
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Reply #9 of 10 posted 12 SEP by Andrew from Dolton
I see, thank you that’s interesting.
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Reply #10 of 10 posted 12 SEP by Give me caffeine
Aren't there Chinese references dating back to the Song dynasty for this rose?
Or at least for something virtually indistinguishable from it.
I remember reading that somewhere, but can't remember where offhand.

Incidentally mine is looking fantastic at the moment. Spring is really agreeing with it this year. Makes wonderful cut flowers too, providing they are cut when just opened.
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Discussion id : 105-019
most recent 25 AUG HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 24 AUG by Andrew from Dolton
‘Old Blush’ with ‘Pompom de Paris’ and Rosa chinensis ‘Minima’, are all remarkably similar.
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 24 AUG by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Fantastic pic. !! I love pictures that compare similar roses. Which one is Old Blush? Thanks.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 25 AUG by jedmar
Lower left
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 25 AUG by Andrew from Dolton
And above is ‘Pompom de Paris’ and Rosa chinensis ‘Minima’ is on he right.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 25 AUG by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thank you !!
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Discussion id : 98-614
most recent 20 APR HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 19 APR by Andrew from Dolton
19/4/17. The first rose of summer!
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 19 APR by sutekesh
That is lovely Andrew - wish my season started so early!
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 19 APR by Andrew from Dolton
We had a mild winter and a warm spell of weather, the roses will be out early this year. 'Hume's Blush', 'Agnes' and 'Madame Alfred Carriere' will be opening soon. But... we could easily still have snow so I won't be in a hurry to plant out my geraniums and runner beans just yet!
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 20 APR by sutekesh
We have had rather a warm spring so far but temperatures have taken a dive this week. We had snow yesterday with heavy frost here this morning!! I covered quite a few of my smaller seedlings but the new growth on the majority of the roses has probably copped it!!!! (like last year) Definitely too early for broad beans and geraniums but thumbs crossed for next week???
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 20 APR by Andrew from Dolton
A few years ago we had a -3 frost on 23rd of May, it completely wiped out all my vegetables and all new growths on most of my shrubs..
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Discussion id : 96-197
most recent 10 APR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 5 DEC 16 by Andrew from Dolton
29/11/16 -4 degrees, 30/11/16 -4 degrees, 1/12/16 -6 degrees, 2/12/16 -7 degrees but still 'Old Blush' goes on and on.
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Reply #1 of 6 posted 9 APR by thebig-bear
What aspect is this growing in please, and is it growing against a wall, as it appears?
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Reply #2 of 6 posted 9 APR by Andrew from Dolton
It is growing in a pot against a south facing wall. My garden is at the bottom of a valley and suffers cold nights all year round, I think it would struggle in the open although the closely related 'Pompom de Paris' does quite well away from the house climbing through a Deutzia.
I must say that I can only smell the scent in the afternoon on a warm day but my sense of smell is not over keen. I can only detect the mildest fragrance from Rosa arvensis despite the description saying that it has a strong fragrance.
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Reply #3 of 6 posted 9 APR by thebig-bear
Thanks for the info - I have an Old Blush growing happily in a sheltered but shaded spot, and I have another new one which I want to position differently to see what it is like when grown in a sunny spot. May well give a south facing wall a go! How big is yours? (if you pardon the expression!) Does the pot help keep the size in check do you think?
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Reply #4 of 6 posted 9 APR by Andrew from Dolton
It is just over 1 metre high and about the same wide but it was only planted last year and already has put on 30 cm of growth this season. At a garden I once worked at they grew 'Climbing Old Blush' on a west facing wall. It grew three metres wide and two metres tall and was in flower constantly from May to November. The flowers nodding forwards in a very charming way.
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Reply #5 of 6 posted 10 APR by thebig-bear
Many thanks once again, that sounds very promising.
Cheers,
Steve
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Reply #6 of 6 posted 10 APR by Andrew from Dolton
Well, it performed very well last year, so that inspired me to try 'Sanguinea', 'Hume's Blush', 'Slater's Crimson', 'Viridiflora' and 'Archduc Charles'. If you wanted to grow a miniature version of 'Old Blush' then chinensis 'Minima' is very easy and flowers in only three months from seed.
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