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'Bussorah rose' References
Book  (1996)  Page(s) 115-118.  
 
Rosa damascena.
Local names: Hindi - 'Bussorah'; U.P.- 'Fasli gulab', 'Barwana'; Beng.- 'Basrai golap'.
...In India the Damsk rose is grown for rose-oil and rose-water in the district of Ghazipur (Ghourabad, Gunda, Fasidi and Asmanicha), Ballia (Sikandarpur), Faizabad, Lucknow, Kanpur (Rewatpur, Binayakpur, Bisayakpur, Banger, Kakadev, Lekinpur and HBTI, Farrukhabad (Kannauj), Aligarh, Etah (Jhinwar) and Udaipur (Nathduara-Khamnore).
...Although the Damask rose flowers from March to July the Peak period being only about 60 days from the middle of March to the middle of May. The weight of a flower varies from 2-2.5 grams, thus 1 kg of flowers number 450 in average.
A temperature range of 25oC-30oC and 60 per Cent relative humidity are ideal for Optimum flowering (Chandra et al 1970). The average yield of flowers is estimated at about 5000 kg per hectare.
Book  (1988)  Page(s) 124.  
 
Bussora a Persian rose of lovely perfume, cultivated for attar and the only Damask [Firming, Gardening in India] knew in India.
Book  (1988)  Page(s) 125.  
 
Dr. Pal considers roses most suitable for perfume today [1988] are 'Bussora' and 'Rose Edouard', while 'Gruss an Teplitz', a crimson rose of China derivation, has been used for experimental purposes.
Book  (1874)  Page(s) 469.  
 
Bussora or Persian Rose.- The Bussora [Basrah] Rose is distinguished for the rich perfume of its flowers, is common all over India, and in some places cultivated extensively for the manufacture of atar. There are two varieties, the red and the white, only partially double, very fugitive, blosssoming for one brief season in March. The stems are profusely covered with small fine spines, and the plant has rather a shabby, unsightly appearance. The usual practice is to head down all the stems in November, remove the earth, so that the roots be laid bare for a week or two, and then fill in the earth again with a liberal supply of old cow-manure.
The Bussora appears to be the form of R. Damascena, such as we might almost expect to find it in its wild, uncultivated state. In this state, seemingly, it is alone capable of existing in India. For I know of no other form of the Damask Rose that has been established in India - not one certainly of the sweet and completely double varieties that in past years were so much the ornament oif English gardens, as indeed of some few they even now are. Examples:- York and Lancaster, Red damask, La Ville de Bruxelles, Madame Stoltz, Madame Hardy.
Book  (1855)  Page(s) Appendix, p. xxii.  
 
The Bussorah Rose, R. gallica, Gulsooree, red, and white, the latter seldom met with, is one of a species containing an immense number of varieties. The fragrance of this rose is its greatest recommendation, for if not kept down, and constantly looked to, it soon gets straggling, and unsightly ; like the preceding species too, the buds issue from the ends of the branches in great clusters, which must be thinned, if well formed fragrant blossoms are desired. The same soil is required as for the preceding, with alternating periods of rest by opening the roots, and of excitement by stimulating manure.
Book  (1855)  Page(s) 130.  
 
636. Rosa, Tournef. Endl. Gen. Plant. p. 1240, So named from the Celtic rhod, red, many of the species being of this colour.
....Rosa gallica, Native name: Bussorah. Cabbage Rose.
Book  (1850)  Page(s) Vol. II, p. 171.  
 
Rosa gallica, pink. Bussorah rose, [blooms] january, february, march, december. 4 ft
Book  (1850)  Page(s) Vol. II, p. 21-22.  
 
The Bussorah rose, R. gallica, Gulsooree, red, and white, the latter seldom met with, is one of a species containing an immense number of varieties. The fragrance of this rose is its greatest recommendation, for if not kept down, and constantly looked to, it soon gets straggling, and unsightly; like the preceding species too, the buds issue from the ends of th e branches in great clusters, which must be thinned, if well formed fragrant blossoms are desired. The same soil is required as for the preceding, with alternating periods of rest by opening the roots, and of excitement by stimulating manure.
Book  (1848)  Page(s) Vol. I, p. 187.  
 
Rose, Bussorah, gul sooree. Rosa gallica.
Magazine  (1841)  Page(s) CVI.  
 
[Garden calendar for October]
Open out the roots of Bussorah roses for early blossoming, and plant cuttings...

[Garden calender for November]
Open out the roots of Bussorah roses for succession, also of rose Edward and Madras rose, cutting down the branches; trim sweet briar, and the many flowered rose...
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