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'Moonstone ™' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 30-900
most recent 12 AUG 15 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 12 OCT 08 by Leslie Davis
I think Moonstone is a beautiful rose and I just had to have it for my garden. I was disappointed to find out it doesn't do well in the hot summers of the valley. First the aphids and then the thrips ate it up and then the blistering heat took over for the next 4 months. Oct now and I'm just getting some decent blooms again after 5 months. I would caution anyone who lives where it gets above the 90's from obtaining this rose, unless you're willing to wait for those few months it isn't that hot and you don't mind thrips damage in the months they're present.
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Reply #1 of 9 posted 17 DEC 10 by Penelope
Too bad. This was on my "Gotta Have it List". Our summers here in Dallas are just like yours, generally getting to around 105 in August. I think 108 was our high last summer.
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Reply #2 of 9 posted 17 DEC 10 by Lyn G
Leslie.....

Thank you for sharing this information. I have added that "this rose prefers cool climates" to the rose page so that other site guests will have the information when they are making their purchasing decisions.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #3 of 9 posted 17 DEC 10 by Rosaholic's Southern California Garden
Hmmm-- this rose does not like MY cooler climate. It thrives in East San Diego in my mother's garden, but here on the coast, most blooms ball up and refuse to open.
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Reply #4 of 9 posted 17 DEC 10 by Lyn G
Should I also add "prefers dry climates" ? It's possible that 'Moonstone' can't take the prolonged heat of the central valley of California, but can handle the coastal heat of areas like San Diego ?

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #6 of 9 posted 17 DEC 10 by Rosaholic's Southern California Garden
I actually think that what this rose needs is heat . . .
I'm really surprised to see someone saying it does NOT like heat.
It does really well at the rose shows in the desert areas.
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Reply #9 of 9 posted 12 AUG 15 by boopie
I agree that this rose can take the dry heat. I live in zone 10 in So Cal and this rose is one of my better performers in the late summer months. Half of my roses I summer prune in August as they just don't perform well in the heat. But this rose produces reliably beautiful blooms, growing in full sun. I have a Francis Meiland growing next to Moonstone. Depending on the time of the year, it is hard to tell them apart. But in the heat Francis looses it form, becomes bleached out and just ugly. So I prune Francis in August, but I let Moonstone bloom all summer. In cooler weather I think it is a nice rose bush, but I think it's strength is in how it handles the summer heat. Very nice rose for cutting, and it keeps its form and color in my garden in the heat, when other roses can't.
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Reply #7 of 9 posted 27 AUG 12 by CarolynB
Are you saying that Moonstone doesn't do well when temperatures are in the 90s? Or that it does well in the 90s but it doesn't do well when temperatures are in the 100s? I live on the borderline between the central valley and the east bay area, and I'm wondering if this would be a good area to grow this rose. Our summer temperatures are usually in the 90s, but only get into the 100s occasionally for a few days at a time.
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Reply #8 of 9 posted 27 AUG 12 by Lyn G
Carolyn...

It's hard to say if the rose will do in your garden. It has take me years to find the roses that can handle my heat, which is in the high 90s and low 100s for most of the summer months.

What I have found is that most roses will crisp when it gets to 100+. i looked at the roses that managed well in my heat and found that roses that had thick petal substance were the roses that held up to the heat the best. The patent on Moonstone says that the petal substance is medium-thick.

I'd suggest you look around your garden and determine which plant characteristics work best for you and use that as a guideline for selecting new roses.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #10 of 9 posted 12 AUG 15 by Nastarana
You might want to consider what exposure would be best. When I gardened in the Central Valley, I found that only the toughest roses, like 'Manchester Guardian Angel' could tolerate a west exposure, with its' hot, dry winds. I wonder if 'Moonstone' might be best placed to the north side of your house or the east. If you are like me, the east side is prime real estate which fills up fast.
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Discussion id : 71-651
most recent 15 MAY 13 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 15 MAY 13 by bluebuster77
Can anyone see this rose fully open?
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Discussion id : 44-412
most recent 4 MAY 10 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 4 MAY 10 by anonymous-402258
What a beauty! Bought a 2 gallon container and had flowers the size of softballs the first year. Long straight stems make it one of my favorites for cutting (great combined with "Memorial Day" - Woo Woo!) Came out of a Detroit winter with flying colors (the site is sheltered by a west wall). Can't comment on disease or insect resistance - - Sprayed weekly with sulpher because we always have problems with mildew here (on everything!) and didn't have any problems. Still early in the season here, but so far she is full of vim, vigor and lots buds.
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Discussion id : 28-898
most recent 13 JUL 08 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 13 JUL 08 by Frhoden
I will have to correct my previous statement on this rose that I made in April. I said it didn't bloom a lot but I must have been thinking about last year. I have moved all my roses and am fertilizing weekly and this rose has been blooming more than most of my hybrid teas. The bloom is large with many petals and has the coloring as stated. The disease resistance is good but I do spray weekly and don't give it a chance to mess up. The foliage is perticularly healthy and full on this rose bush. I can't be more pleased. Well, yes, it could have a scent which it does not.
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