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Bagatelle Park / La Roseraie de Bagatelle
'Bagatelle Park / La Roseraie de Bagatelle'  photo
Public rose and peony garden   Listing last updated on 24 Nov 2017.
Le parc de Bagatelle
Allée de Longchamp, route de Sèvres

Versailles, Paris 75016
France
USDA Zone: 8a
+33 (0)1 40 71 75 60  [Information]
+33 (0)1 40 71 93 56  [Fax]
Photo courtesy of William Grant.
The rose garden at Bagatelle was created in 1906 by landscape architect, Jean Claude Nicolas Forestier and Jules Gravereaux. There are now over 9,000 roses and over one thousand varieties. It is part of the property that surrounds a chateau built by Comte d'Artois for his sister-in-law, Marie Antoinette. The rose garden at Bagatelle contains one of the best collections of antique and species roses.


[From The Old Rose Adventurer, by Brent C. Dickerson, p. 469:] The park of Montjuich, at Barcelona, Spain, the most beautiful public park in the world (I am told, and I believe it), designed by J.C.N. Forestier... The name of Forestier is intimately connected with Bagatelle, because it was he who organized that contest in 1907... Monsieur Forestier was the foremost garden designer of the modern school...


In The Quest for the Roses, by Roger Phillips and Martyn Rix, p. 7, there is a photograph of the formal rose gardens at Bagatelle, on the edge of the Bois de Boulogne in Paris.


The park is open every day from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm.


Bagatelle & ses jardins, by J.C.N. Forestier, lists about 12,000 roses.


[From La Roseraie de Bagatelle, by Albert Brush, p. 118:] La Roseraie de Bagatelle is now [1950] under the direction of M. Toussaint, General Inspector of Woods and Forests, and chief of Parks and Gardens of Paris. M. Demorlaine succeeded the original director, J.C.N. Forestier.


[From La Roseraie de Bagatelle, by Albert Brush, pp. 115-116:] late in the 18th century it became the property of the Comte d'Artois, brother to Louis XVI. He made a wager with his sister-in-law, Queen Marie Antoinette, that he could tear it down, rebuild, decorate and furnish it and plant new gardens in the then current English style while she was away for two months on a trip with the court. This he managed to do by employing 900 workmen day and night at a cost far exceeding the sum he won. Belanger was the architect of the new chateau, little changed today [1950], and the Scotchman Blaikie was the gardener.... [in 1904] the City of Paris acquired the chateau and gardens and decided to make it a monument of the evolution of gardening...

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