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American Gardening
(1893)  Page(s) 519.  
 
America is a buff or apricot-colored rose, and in many respects a good, serviceable running rose. An old Connecticut rose grower made the assertion that this rose stood in the same relation to the family of roses that America does to the family of nations. Although I am unable to endorse his sentiment regarding the rose, I can fully recommend it as an excellent stock for Marechal Niel. The union was so complete that years after it was impossible to tell where it had been budded. The flowers of Marechal Niel were lighter in color on this stock than on Cloth of Gold, which, but for one fault, is much the best stock of those under consideration.
(1897)  Page(s) 206.  
 
It is proved beyond question that American Beauty is absolutely identical with Mme. Ferdinand Jamain? If such be the case, then someone willfully misled the public, or else the change was done in ignorance. But, on the other hand, it is claimed that the American Beauty is distinct from the French variety named, and that such has been proved by the importation of stock both ways. There seems no reason why the existing rose should not be a form or climatic variety of Mme. Ferdinand Jamin. One thing, at all events is certain, that the men who had to do with the introduction are honorable men, and sent out American Beauty in good faith.

The history of the Rose in George Bancroft's greenhouse is not quite clear; we only get to know anything about it from the greenhouses of Field Bros., who successfully grew and propagated it. And J. H. Samll & Sons, of Washington D.C. somewhere about 1882, saw merit in the blooms, and began to use them in their choicest decorations. At that time the Rose was condemned by many growers as useless, and other imported plant of Mme. Ferdinand Jamain, so as to get stock, but fialed to produce the same article as the Messrs. Field had. Today American Beauty heads the list of American Roses, as such is sold in Europe, being recognised as distinct. American Rose growers wishing to put in several house of American Beauty do not send to Europe for Mme. Ferdinand Jamain.

The possibility of there being two different seedlings, -that is, so far as their origin is concerned-and having different constitutions, yet producing flowers that are in all intents and purposes identical, is not to be questioned; and such an occurrence would explain the point at issue. Or, again, one individual plant of a given variety may so adapt itself to new conditions as to be the starting point in the development of a constitutionally distinct form, which in all other respects will retain the appearances and character of the type. The tendency to variation is present in all plants, and we see no reason why this should not manifest itself in the form of a climatic variant....it is evident...that the popular American Rose is better adapted to the viscissitudes of the American climate than is its French twin sister.
 
(Jun 1893)  
 
The American Belle is a sport from 'American Beauty' and originated with John Burton, a florist of Philadelphia, PA, in 1888. The American Belle is not as strong a grower as the Beauty, but has plenty of vigor to make good, long flower-stems. It is a very free bloomer for so large a rose, producing more good flowers than its parent. The color is a rich, deep pink, fading with age to a beautiful light silvery pink. One of its strong points is that the color is good when the flower is old, and it does not turn purple, as does the Beauty. In form it greatly resembles its parent, although it is not quite so full in the center.
 
(15 Mar 1902)  Page(s) 168.  
 
"Hybrid Stock for Rose Propagation" (Paper read before the American Rose Society by Dr. W. Van Fleet)
For high budding we have found nothing better than the Penzance Hybrid Sweetbriers, Rose Bradwardine, Amy Robsart, and Anne of Gierstein. They grow here more upright and vigorous than the type species, and are not subject to sun-scald like standard Manetti.
(15 Mar 1902)  Page(s) 168.  
 
"Hybrid Stock for Rose Propagation" (Paper read before the American Rose Society by Dr. W. Van Fleet)
For high budding we have found nothing better than the Penzance Hybrid Sweetbriers, Rose Bradwardine, Amy Robsart, and Anne of Gierstein. They grow here more upright and vigorous than the type species, and are not subject to sun-scald like standard Manetti.
(22 Mar 1902)  Page(s) 193.  
 
From minutes of the Executive Committee of the Society of American Florists, March 4, 1902:

The question of the identity of the rose known as Helen Gould came up for discussion, and after a full expression of views by the members, a vote was passed as follows:
Whereas, The matter of the synonymy of the imported rose Balduin, which rose has been known and sold variously as Balduin, Columbia, Red Kaiserin and Helen Gould, having come to the attention of the Executive Committee of the S. A. F., through the secretary, in his laudable endeavor to have his published record of new introductions correct, the correspondence as had by him with several interested parties having been presented to that committee, and,
Whereas, The communications published in the trade papers upon this subject convince the Executive Committee that the matter of synonymy of said rose Balduin, has been definitely settled by a committee of the Philadelphia Florists' Club, appointed to investigate same, Be it
Resolved, That the Executive Committee, while deprecating the action which made necessary the work of the said committee of the Philadelphia Florists' Club, compliment that committee on their exhaustive labors which have resulted in establishing said synonymy, and while appreciating the estimable service rendered by said committee of the Philadelphia Florists’ Club to the trade and the public at large, the Executive Committee consider that no further action in the premises is necessary on their part.
(1899)  Page(s) 144.  
 
In the long experience of the writer would advise eight or ten for this space Instead of twenty varieties as asked for; and I should start the list with White Rambler, Baltimore Belle, Yellow Rambler, Gem of the Prairie, Empress of China.
 
(15 Mar 1902)  Page(s) 168.  
 
Bessie Brown has many points that go to make up a valuable Rose. While it is probably the grandest variety of Carnot color, it sometimes comes with crimped outer petals, which somewhat detracts from its beauty.
 
(15 Mar 1902)  Page(s) 168.  
 
"Hybrid Stock for Rose Propagation" (Paper read before the American Rose Society by Dr. W. Van Fleet)
For high budding we have found nothing better than the Penzance Hybrid Sweetbriers, Rose Bradwardine, Amy Robsart, and Anne of Gierstein. They grow here more upright and vigorous than the type species, and are not subject to sun-scald like standard Manetti.
 
(1898)  Page(s) 759, Nov. 5, 1898.  Includes photo(s).
 
During the past season a considerable amount of pleasure has been afforded by a half dozen plants of this new Rose which Messrs. A. W. Burpee & Co. are introducing. We received them early in the season before the frosts departed for good. They had been grown under glass, were in flower on arrival, and from that time to the present (excepting two weeks in August) they have not been without a flower. The Burbank Rose is thus almost a really perpetual bloomer. The accompanying figures convey a very real idea of the character of the individual bloom and of the free flowering qualities of the plant...It is unfortunate that a Rose which combines so many attractive features and a good color should be absolutely scentless...The color of the flower is very pleasing but difficult of description. Luther Burbank, the raiser, describes it thus, "perhaps more cherry-crimson than pink, with none of the dead color of Hermosa," and indeed the brightness of the color is very striking; the tint appears to deepen into a glow at the base of each petal...
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