HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
BookPlants ReferencedPhotosReviews & CommentsRatings 
Journal of a Horticultural Tour through some parts of Flanders, Holland, and the North of France, in the Autumn of 1817
(1823)  Page(s) 180.  
 
One of his [Cornelis Stegerhoek] latest and finest varities he has named Rose de la Belle Alliance, - a name more likely to be attractive at London than Paris.
(1823)  Page(s) 529.  
 
Mr. Brown of Perth made Trials of the seeds of other [than Scots Roses] kinds of garden roses, about the year 1796, and procured several seedlings of great Beauty, particularly the following....
Blush-tree Burnet leaved, double, raised from the single Burnet-leaved, with shining or glossy leaves, and red berries.
 
(1823)  Page(s) 149-150.  
 
But we now learned, that the rose-gardens of Noordwyck are distinguished for their extent chiefly, and not for the number of varieties of rose-tree cultivated. The great object of the cultivators is the collecting of the petals of the flowers, to be used in perfumery and in medicine. A profuse bloom of roses is therefore much more desirable to them than fine colours or regular shapes. In point of fact, only three or four kinds are in general cultivation. These are chiefly varieties of two of the species of rose-tree above mentioned: One variety, which we call the Dutch Hundred-leaved Rose, is regarded as belonging to the Rosa Gallica; another is our common Cabbage-rose, a third what we style the Dutch Provins, and these last are considered, by Mr Lindley, as having sprung from R. centifolia. A friend who visited the place has informed us, that the flowers are sent annually in great quantities to Amsterdam, and that they are thence exported even to Constantinople, where they are used by the Turks for making rose-water.
 
(1823)  Page(s) 529.  
 
Mr. Brown of Perth made Trials of the seeds of other [than Scots Roses] kinds of garden roses, about the year 1796, and procured several seedlings of great Beauty, particularly the following....
Chance, double blush, raised from double Damask, (R. damascena.)
(1823)  Page(s) 530.  
 
Mr. Brown possesses a new rose of considerable Beauty, raised at New Scone, and which first flowered in summer 1821. He calls it the Coronation Rose.
(1823)  Page(s) 529.  
 
Mr. Brown of Perth made Trials of the seeds of other [than Scots Roses] kinds of garden roses, about the year 1796, and procured several seedlings of great Beauty, particularly the following....
Diana, double blush, raised from the same [Maiden's Blush].
(1823)  Page(s) 529.  
 
Mr. Brown of Perth made Trials of the seeds of other [than Scots Roses] kinds of garden roses, about the year 1796, and procured several seedlings of great Beauty, particularly the following....
Duchess, double blush, raised from the Maiden Blush.
(1823)  Page(s) 179-180.  
 
But we now learned, that the rose-gardens of Noordwyck are distinguished for their extent chiefly, and not for the number of varieties of rose-tree cultivated. The great object of the cultivators is the collecting of the petals of the flowers, to be used in perfumery and in medicine. A profuse bloom of roses is therefore much more desirable to them than fine colours or regular shapes. In point of fact, only three or four kinds are in general cultivation. These are chiefly varieties of two of the species of rose-tree above mentioned: One variety, which we call the Dutch Hundred-leaved Rose, is regarded as belonging to the Rosa Gallica; another is our common Cabbage-rose, a third what we style the Dutch Provins, and these last are considered, by Mr Lindley, as having sprung from R. centifolia. A friend who visited the place has informed us, that the flowers are sent annually in great quantities to Amsterdam, and that they are thence exported even to Constantinople, where they are used by the Turks for making rose-water.
(1823)  Page(s) 149-150.  
 
But we now learned, that the rose-gardens of Noordwyck are distinguished for their extent chiefly, and not for the number of varieties of rose-tree cultivated. The great object of the cultivators is the collecting of the petals of the flowers, to be used in perfumery and in medicine. A profuse bloom of roses is therefore much more desirable to them than fine colours or regular shapes. In point of fact, only three or four kinds are in general cultivation. These are chiefly varieties of two of the species of rose-tree above mentioned: One variety, which we call the Dutch Hundred-leaved Rose, is regarded as belonging to the Rosa Gallica; another is our common Cabbage-rose, a third what we style the Dutch Provins, and these last are considered, by Mr Lindley, as having sprung from R. centifolia. A friend who visited the place has informed us, that the flowers are sent annually in great quantities to Amsterdam, and that they are thence exported even to Constantinople, where they are used by the Turks for making rose-water.
(1823)  Page(s) 529.  
 
Mr. Brown of Perth made Trials of the seeds of other [than Scots Roses] kinds of garden roses, about the year 1796, and procured several seedlings of great Beauty, particularly the following....
Dwarf Burnet-leaved, double, raised from the same [single Burnet-leaved].
© 2017 HelpMeFind.com