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A Rose Odyssey
(1937)  Page(s) 65.  
 
[From the A Rose Odyssey, by Nicolas, 1937, pp. 63-64:] [L. Pahissa's] first noteworthy production to go into commerce is Alezane, a new type of plant and of an interesting color. The name, French for "sorrel", came to it in a strange way. One of my nieces in Paris, a child of ten years with brownish-red hair, told me that the other children in the school had nicknamed her the Alezane and she did not like it. I assured her that it was a very pretty name and to prove it I would name a rose Alezane. It made the child happy and at the same time it gave us the descriptive name for which Pahissa and I had been searching for his rose.
(1937)  Page(s) 162.  
 
Krause had a lucky strike in 1929 with three beautiful exhibition which he dedicated to himself and his family: Max Krause, Louise Krause and Edith Krause. these can be grown to magnificent size and form to be sure winners in shows, but they are rather shy bloomers for garden purpose, where continuity of color is more important than individual beauty.
(1937)  
 
I have mentioned Lambert's masterpiece, Frau Karl Druschki. An American catalogue said, "Its only fault is an overexuberant growth for a small space. It requires hardhearted pruning to keep it of manageable size." Druschki and the other vigorous Hybrid Perpetuals are not "overexuberant" in Europe, not solely because they are budded from flowering wood, which in itself has a tendency to moderate the growth, but mostly because they are budded on a rootstock, R. canina, which, not being overvigorous, checks the exuberant tendency. ... In Lambert's fields I have not seen a single Druschki over twenty-four inches high, but all were full of bloom.
(1937)  Page(s) 14.  
 
Several years ago there was a discussion in American Rose Society circles about the genuineness of the American stock of General Jacqueminot. I studied the question abroad and found at Reymond's a line of magnificent everblooming General Jacqueminot, descendants of the original stock he had inherited from his Uncle Roussel, the originator. These had been improved almost to the status of a Hybrid Tea (sic) in floriferousness. We acquired enough plants from Reymond to rejuvenate our stock and the General Jacqueminot stock of Jackson and Perkins is of authentic French origin
(1937)  Page(s) 88.  
 
...also the climber, Ile de France (1922), a double form of American Pillar.
(1937)  Page(s) 162.  
 
Krause had a lucky strike in 1929 with three beautiful exhibition which he dedicated to himself and his family: Max Krause, Louise Krause and Edith Krause. these can be grown to magnificent size and form to be sure winners in shows, but they are rather shy bloomers for garden purpose, where continuity of color is more important than individual beauty.
(1937)  Page(s) 64.  
 
It was on that trip [in 1925] that I discovered and brought to America one of the most glorious hardy climbers, Mme. Grégoire Staechelin or Spanish Beauty.
(1937)  Page(s) 159.  
 
Some of us old timers may remember an early Van Fleet Hybrid Tea, Magnafrano (1900). For years it was sold on its own roots and it remained a typical Hybrid Tea. I budded it on Multiflora for breeding purposes and I got plants of Druschki exuberance, thus emphasizing its seed parent, Magna Charta. It is from one of these plants that I bred the climber Virginia.
(1937)  Page(s) 162.  
 
Krause had a lucky strike in 1929 with three beautiful exhibition which he dedicated to himself and his family: Max Krause, Louise Krause and Edith Krause. these can be grown to magnificent size and form to be sure winners in shows, but they are rather shy bloomers for garden purpose, where continuity of color is more important than individual beauty.
(1937)  Page(s) 65.  
 
[M. Munné]...made a good strike with Mercedes Gallart, a truly everblooming cerise pink climber.
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