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jedmar
most recent 4 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 7 days ago by Unregistered Guest
Rose Listing Omission

Academia

Nom : Academia
Description : Rose très pleine en forme de pivoine très parfumées. Floraison bien remontante. Bonne résistance aux maladies. Bonne variété pour la fleur à coupée.
Couleur : rose
taille : 0 , 80
Parfum : strong flagrance

LInk source : http://www.lesrosiersbelmontais.fr/index.php?fiche&ref=RBGF0120
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 4 days ago by jedmar
This rose is listed as 'Accademia' under which name it is sold in Italy. We have added the synonym, thank you!
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most recent 4 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 7 days ago by Unregistered Guest
Rose Listing Omission

Escale parfumée

Description : Prix du parfum lors du 85 ème Concours de Lyon (2015).
C'est un rosier à fleurs groupées (floribunda).
Année : 2015
bred by : Virginie SIMON
Couleur : rouge clair
hauteur : 0.90 CM à 1 M 20
Parfum : puissante note florale rosée, avec une tête d'agrume.
rosier remontant



Link : https://www.roseraie-guerinais.com/fr/floribondas/623-escale-parfumee-simteacla.html
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 4 days ago by jedmar
Thank you! We had this rose listed as SI 03 F 6 under which name it had participated in the Lyon Trials.
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most recent 4 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 5 days ago by anonymous-382123
Rose Listing Omission

Niharika and Travail des benevoles

Dear Patricia,
I discovered a few beautiful roses not on HMF:

-Niharika see:roses-orard

-Travail des bénévoles ,breeder: Marcus Braun 2015 see: travail des bénévoles-Rosaplant
Friendly greetings wl
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 4 days ago by jedmar
Thank you, these are added!
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most recent 13 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 16 DEC by Andrew from Dolton
Does anyone know if Rosa multiflora seed needs to be stratified first or can germinate without cold treatment?
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Reply #1 of 11 posted 17 DEC by jedmar
Rosa multiflora grows in 300-2000m in China, so it would seem to need cold periods. In USA it is an invasive neophyte in a band from Kentucky to the East Coast. I found this text on Bugwood Wiki:
"In eastern North America, multiflora rose is abundant from the Great Plains (where the species has been planted as wind breaks) to the east coast. It occurs from northern Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia in the south, north to the New England coast, central New York, southern Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. It occurs only as plantings south of central Georgia, probably because of the lack of cold temperatures needed to stimulate seed germination. The plant’s northern distribution is limited by its sensitivity to severe cold temperatures."
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Reply #2 of 11 posted 17 DEC by Andrew from Dolton
Thank you Jedmar, the seeds are now in my refrigerator. The seeds are from a particularly deep pink flowered variety of the above dwarf sport.
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Reply #3 of 11 posted 17 DEC by Andrew from Dolton
When I was in Switzerland, some years ago, on the train from Zurich to Kreuzlingen there were white rambler type roses growing wild on the embankments, sprawling on the ground. Would that have been multiflora?
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Reply #4 of 11 posted 17 DEC by jedmar
I must admit I have no idea! Rosa multiflora is not an invasive neophyte in Switzerland. Could it have been plantings of Rosa rugosa alba?
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Reply #5 of 11 posted 17 DEC by Andrew from Dolton
No, it definitely had stems trailing on the ground and panicles of smallish flowers, maybe too prostrate to be multiflora.
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Reply #6 of 11 posted 13 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
I put the seeds in the refrigerator for three weeks, then, because I am impatient and they had already been outside in the cold I took them out and gave them some bottom heat on new year's day. This morning the first seedling has germinated.
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Reply #7 of 11 posted 13 days ago by Jay-Jay
Would that implicate, that seeds of a lot of roses don't need stratification to germinate.
I already wondered, whether Hybrid Tea seeds would be better of without a cool period.
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Reply #8 of 11 posted 13 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
What I had planned to do was to alternate between cold and warmth periods, 30 days each time, until the seed germinated. I picked the seed the day before I sowed them (on 15th December), and before that we had had six weeks of temperatures cool enough to stratify seed. They actually probably didn't need any time in the fridge at all. I would think that Hybrid-Tea roses would just grow straight away from a hip picked from outside right now, but I wouldn't be so sure about seed collected say in September. A China rose or a Tea probably don't need a cold period because they come from a warmer climate.
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Reply #9 of 11 posted 13 days ago by Jay-Jay
Next week the seeds I got from Pakistan of R. webbiana collected from Batura Glacier, Gilgit Baltistan region, Pakistan by KBW Organic 9b will be sown.
Then they have been in the fridge at 1°C for two months. I think, that those need stratification, when I see at which height they were collected near a glacier.
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Reply #10 of 11 posted 13 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Yes I think that's wise. Sowing seeds and waiting for them to germinate is just the most exciting thing
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Reply #11 of 11 posted 13 days ago by Jay-Jay
I hope they'll germinate, for I got them dried. Soaked them for 48 hours in regularly replenished water, kept them a short period in a watery solution of Hydrogen-peroxide and per-acetic acid, to kill eventual diseases.
And then kept them in the fridge in wet coarse grained sand.
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