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Patricia Routley
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Initial post 3 DEC 16 by Patricia Routley
This red rose, "Whatley Crescent", recently threw a sport from the base. The sporting bloom was pink, somewhat like 'Briarcliff' (which was a sport of Columbia). I apologise that I was running a bit too fast to stop and take a photo, but I am now wondering if the red "Whatley Crescent" could be 'Red Columbia', 1920.

Later edit. Probably not feasible because so far, I cannot find 'Red Columbia' entering Australia.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted yesterday by HubertG
Is 'Warrior' from Paul 1906 worth considering? It was a winter flowering tea-like HT.
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Initial post yesterday by HubertG
Rose Listing Omission

Marie Louise

"Marie Louise - (Sarter, 1855) (T.) Light blush; a profuse bloomer and strong branching grower; very popular."

From Leedle Floral Co 1914 Fall catalogue, page 28
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Reply #1 of 2 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
I've temporarily put this under 'Alba rosea carnea' (tea, Lartay, 1863). What do you think?
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Reply #2 of 2 posted yesterday by HubertG
I can't find references on the breeder Sarter (or Sartre). It does say it's a tea. Maybe it is a locally bred American tea that simply persisted because of the local demand. It's a mystery.
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Initial post yesterday by HubertG
From J. Steckler's Seeds Co almanac 1905, page 134

"Mme. Derepas Matrat.; Yellow Cochet. A pure Tea rose, very free-growing and hardy in character, withstanding ten degrees below zero. It throws up fine, strong stems, crowned by solitary buds of grand size; the color is a good sulphur-yellow, blooms very large, perfectly double, splendid form and freely produced. It has every quality necessary to make the ideal yellow bedder, ranking with the White and Pink Cochets in value as a Summer rose"
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Reply #1 of 1 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
Thanks HubertG. Added. I have also added the 1914 Leedle ref and they didn't like it much.
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Initial post 2 JAN 16 by Patricia Routley
Thank you so much for adding the 1910 and the two 1911 references Virginia. It is womderful that someone in America can find, AND CONTRIBUTE, these old snippets relating to a Queensland-bred rose. I note 'Souvenir de Therese Levet' has entered the fray in the parentage stakes. Perhaps the Queensland members of Heritage Roses in Australia would enjoy a trip to Charters Towers to peer over fences at old tea roses.
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Reply #1 of 4 posted yesterday by HubertG
From "The Leedle Floral Co." (Springfield, Ohio) 1913 catalogue, page 25:

"Penelope (Williams, 1910.)
Colors unique and beautiful; outer petals at times quite blood red, shading paler towards the center which is primrose-yellow. Large and very full, with an appearance of the Maman Cochet type."

It is marked with as asterisk in the index to indicate that it is a new rose.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
This is the first reference of 'Penelope' in America.
I need to enter Leedle as a publication. Can I have an URL for that issue please HubertG - I can't find it.
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Reply #3 of 4 posted yesterday by HubertG
Sure, this should get you there.

https://archive.org/details/CAT31293961

The catalogues are interesting because this nursery seems to pride themselves on what they claim are accurate descriptions.
Penelope seems to have disappeared from their list by the 1917 catalogue.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
Thanks HubertG. Reference added.
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