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rafael maino
most recent 30 APR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 27 APR by HubertG
I just wanted to comment that I really like the new study name. If more foundlings were given attractive study names, such as in this case, more people would be likely to want to grow them, especially if they end up being reintroduced into commerce.
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Reply #1 of 10 posted 27 APR by Margaret Furness
Pity about where "Guppy St" was found...
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 27 APR by HubertG
LOL, that's what I mean. These roses need to be classified logically but a little aesthetic foresight might go a long way.
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Reply #4 of 10 posted 27 APR by Give me caffeine
It's not just study names that are problematic. There are plenty of registration names which are about as poetic as a bowl of cold tripe.
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Reply #3 of 10 posted 27 APR by Give me caffeine
You could refer to it as "Poecilia thoroughfare" if you want it to sound posher.
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Reply #5 of 10 posted 27 APR by HubertG
LOL, maybe even Mme Poecilia de Thoroughfaire.
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Reply #6 of 10 posted 27 APR by Give me caffeine
Or even "Mme Poecilia de Thoroughfaire, Comtesse de la Rue".

That would knock Mme Wagram off its perch for silliest name. ;)

Edit: By the way, I've always wanted to grow 'Ferdinand Pichard', just so I could nickname it "Fred the Stripey Cabbage".
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Reply #7 of 10 posted 27 APR by HubertG
Hahahaha!

Patricia, is it too late to change my Dr Grill rose to 'Madame la Docteure Barb EcuƩ?

And sorry Rafael for hi-jacking your listing a bit. You have a nice rose with a lovely name. I hope you get some good suggestions for it.
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Reply #8 of 10 posted 27 APR by Margaret Furness
"Guppy St" is probably Mrs Harold Brocklebank, which isn't much of an improvement. But it's a wonderful rose
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Reply #9 of 10 posted 30 APR by rafael maino
Thank you HubertG!!, and the poor Juani she does not even know that I put her name to a rose, ( I should probably tell her....)
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Reply #10 of 10 posted 30 APR by HubertG
Rafael, yes, I'm sure she would be delighted!
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most recent 30 APR HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 28 APR by Patricia Routley
Rafael - I have added a couple of ideas to the main page for "Juani de Temperley". They are just roses to consider in the search for its true name.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 30 APR by rafael maino
Hi Patricia, I think it's not "Dr. Grill", "Juani" does not have as many petals, and they are not so rounded, Juani always open like a star
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most recent 30 APR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 27 APR by Margaret Furness
Lovely!
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 30 APR by rafael maino
Have you seen the size, Margaret?!!, it will cover my house!!, and the plant it's 5 years old.... it become a monster!
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most recent 30 APR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 23 APR by rafael maino
Found tea, noisette? rose in Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Vigorous, fragrant flowers, double or semi double, beautiful when buds, open loose,bushy, 250 cm high x 200 cm width. It flower all season, occasional repeat, later in the season, middle green leaves.I ask if It could be 'L'Ideal', G. Nabonnand 1887??
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Reply #1 of 13 posted 23 APR by Patricia Routley
Hello Rafael,
My gut feeling is that it is not 'L'Ideal'. I spent a couple of hours adding a few more references to the 'L'Ideal' file and it seems that 'L'Ideal' may have been small to medium plant, with a small to medium sized, semi-double bloom. It was often mentioned alongside 'William Allen Richardson' and I think that may be a smaller sized bloom. Your photo with your hand in it (315489) seems to show quite a large bloom. Another gut feeling (of which I am not quite sure about) is that blooms with that spiky pointed outline might be that of a more modern rose. I really hope that other people might contribute their thoughts on this beautiful rose.

Perhaps it might be valuable to look at 'L'Ideal's descendants to see if any tiny scrap of knowledge can be gleaned from those roses.

If you would like us to make a file for your foundling, please let us know the "study name".
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Reply #2 of 13 posted 23 APR by Margaret Furness
A wonderful find, whatever it is!
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Reply #4 of 13 posted 23 APR by rafael maino
And Thank you Margaret!!!, she is very pretty in bud....not so much when open....but have a good fragrance
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Reply #3 of 13 posted 23 APR by rafael maino
Thank you Patricia for your interest!!, I take cuttings from the plant (from Buenos Aires) and now grows in my garden, with very different climate and soil ( and I hope she pass the winter...this is the third...), I think that many characteristics match with the references of L'Ideal, especially the color and shape of the flowers when it said that have very good shape in bud, loose when expanded...and it's not so big, no more than 8 cm diameter. Any way this is a strange rose, and L'Ideal become a strange rose too since there are no photos at all, only the chromolithography.
Best regards!!
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Reply #5 of 13 posted 23 APR by rafael maino
I give her a study name "Juani de Temperley", Juani is a affectionate diminutive of Juana, the name of the lady owner of the garden where I found the rose, and Temperley is a suburb of Buenos Aires, originally inhabited by many English immigrants.
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Reply #6 of 13 posted 23 APR by Patricia Routley
File opened. Let's leave the photos where they are for a couple of days to give others a chance to look at them and respond.
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Reply #7 of 13 posted 24 APR by HubertG
How's this for being fanciful/imaginative?

Louise Bourbonnaud was a wealthy Parisian philanthropist and socialite who I believe travelled extensively including to Buenos Airies. She had a Nabonnand rose named after her. Perhaps someone (English or not) had met her during her travels and ordered her rose to grow. The description seems to match fairly well. 'Louise Bourbonnaud' is from G. Nabonnand x Gen. Schablikine.

Chances are it isn't this, but something to think about.
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Reply #8 of 13 posted 25 APR by Patricia Routley
Rafael, is there any history attached to the rose? (how long it has been there). I am not sure if the size of the stump (base) will be of any use, as the stump of a 50 year old rose might be the same as that of a 100 year old rose.
You say " It flower all season, occasional repeat, later in the season". Can you be more definite in that?
Does it set hips? Any photos?
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Reply #9 of 13 posted 26 APR by Margaret Furness
Teas can get very big, and some don't take long to do it. Do you think your Juani is a climber, or just an old bush?
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Reply #10 of 13 posted 26 APR by rafael maino
Hi Patricia and Margaret!, I'm sorry but I can't answer about how old is the "mother" plant, and how it was treated (pruned, etc) to know the size of the plant (people here sometimes prune the roses like HT...), any way she seemed not so pruned at all or not so much...I am telling this vagueness because I am now in my house in Patagonia and the rose it's in Buenos Aires, and the owner is not a close friend (and she is an old lady...). But I remember when I saw the rose was nearly end of autumn and it have only a few flowers and buds (and Buenos Aires have a very temperate climate), the plant looked very vigorous and healthy, and was about 250 cm high (2,50 m), it don't look like a climber, rather bushy. My plant that I take from cuttings it's well growing here in my garden, it's almost three years old and it's near 90 cm high now, it flower all season in flushes, but now (autumn) have no buds and I think she is going to sleep!!, I think it does no hips but any way we must consider that my plant it's very young, and probably she will do when grows. I put a photo here of the general look of the plant mother, I don't know if the photo shows well the appearance. I will try to talk with the lady colleague of AsociaciĆ³n Argentina de Rosicultura, Buenos Aires, who take me to see the rose to her friend house, may be she can send me more photos. Thank you Ladies!!
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Reply #11 of 13 posted 26 APR by Patricia Routley
Our pleasure Rafael.
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Reply #12 of 13 posted 27 APR by Patricia Routley
I think it is time to move those photos now. I'll do it for you Rafael. It is a great pity that nobody has replied publicly, but I have shared in a private email from a rosarian who had a most interesting thought on this rose. I'll get her permission to share it with you in the new file.
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Reply #13 of 13 posted 30 APR by rafael maino
Thank you Patricia!!
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