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Darrell
most recent 3 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 7 JAN 16 by AquaEyes
I don't grow either, but I'm noticing some similarities between this rose and the rose currently being grown as 'Rembrandt' (not the original). Has anyone else made the comparisons?

http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.5182.0&tab=1

:-)

~Christopher
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Reply #1 of 8 posted 6 days ago by Patricia Routley
Excellent suggestion Christopher. I will check my pedicel and receptacle today, but I am growing ‘Rembrandt’ in a different country.
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Reply #2 of 8 posted 5 days ago by Patricia Routley
‘Rembrandt’ would work as far as the pedicel and smooth receptacle goes, but on this characteristic alone, so would ‘Paul Perras’ and another foundling of mine “Eileen Giblett’s No. 15” in the same bed.
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Reply #3 of 8 posted 5 days ago by AquaEyes
Ah, but 'Plaul Perras' (aka what's being sold as 'Paul Ricault') has a different growth habit, and is once-blooming.

I guess I'll compare them myself by getting both for The Elmwood Cemetery. I didn't have that option back when I wrote that question, but now I do.

:-)

~Christopher
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Reply #4 of 8 posted 5 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
The rose being grown in the U.K. as 'Paul Ricault' has blunt smooth sepals.
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Reply #5 of 8 posted 5 days ago by Patricia Routley
I wasn't implying that "Benny Lopez" was 'Paul Perras', but rather ON THIS CHARACTERISTIC ALONE, two of my other roses were the same. So perhaps it may be a fairly common feature of some roses and perhaps one should look for another distinguishing trait or signature of "Benny Lopez".
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Reply #6 of 8 posted 4 days ago by AquaEyes
Just for clarification, pics I see on here for both "Benny Lopez" and 'Rembrandt (in commerce as)' show variability with respect to having smooth vs prickly receptacles and pedicels. Maybe what's grown as 'Rembrandt' in Australia differs from that by the name in the US. Or maybe these roses just vary. But, going back, I still see some similarities between "Benny Lopez" and 'Rembrandt (in commerce as)', at least based on pictures. I'm hoping someone who grows both chimes in with their thoughts.

:-)

~Christopher
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Reply #7 of 8 posted 4 days ago by Darrell
Though the coloring seems the same in the flower, my 'Rembrandt' is much more prickly and much taller than my "Benny Lopez"; they grow about ten feet from each other, so the comparison is easy to do. In addition, the leaflets of "Benny Lopez" are much more sharply serrate than those on 'Rembrandt'. They also have more sheen to them than those of 'Rembrandt.
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Reply #8 of 8 posted 3 days ago by AquaEyes
Thanks so much for responding here! Well, I guess my little wondering from almost three years ago has been finally answered.

:-)

~Christopher
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most recent 25 SEP SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 6 AUG 17 by Darrell
This photo is not from the 1922 American Rose Annual. I own the book. It is not listed in the contents of plates. Nor could I find it when I went through the book page by page. Nor is it in the 1921 or 1923 annual. Perhaps it's from The Rose Annual of England?
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 7 AUG 17 by Margaret Furness
It's not in the list of illustrations in the 1922 Rose Annual.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 7 AUG 17 by Patricia Routley
It might be R. hugonis from the 1916 American Rose Annual p32?

The photo was used in McFarland's 1937 Roses of the World in Colour p176 and labelled there Rosa multibracteata.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 7 AUG 17 by Rupert, Kim L.
Thanks, Darrell, Margaret and Patricia. I scanned the image some time ago and don't have access to my books as they are packed in the garage where I can't get to them. I don't have the 1916 ARS annual but do have the McFarland book. I posted a number of scanned images in an evening and probably mis labeled this one while labeling the bunch.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 25 SEP by CybeRose
1920 ARA.
https://books.google.com/books?id=0EsPAQAAIAAJ&dq=Rosa%20multibracteata&pg=PA19-IA2#v=onepage&q&f=false
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 25 SEP by Rupert, Kim L.
Thank you, Karl.
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most recent 27 AUG HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 27 AUG by Darrell
There seems to be a contradiction or error in the category of Breeders under Verdier, Philippe-Victor. The information states that Charles is the younger son (born 1824) and Eugene the elder (born 1827). Either the birth dates are incorrect or the sequence of siblings is incorrect. But Eugene is also called " fils aine", meaning the elder sibling. Also under "Verdier fils aine, Eugene," he is stated to be the elder son but born in 1827. Since several of the quoted sources also state that Eugene is the eldest, the birth dates for one or both brothers seems incorrect.
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most recent 11 JUN HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 JUN by Darrell
Re: Rosa bracteata, the Macartney Rose: Why is the date given as 1765 for Lord Macartney's discovery (actually it was George Staunton's discovery) when he did not see the rose until 1793 on his mission to China?
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