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Jim Delahanty
most recent 30 AUG 15 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 4 DEC 09 by James Delahanty
Here in southern california (Sherman Oaks) my Mel Hulse sulked in the ground, but returned to health and bloom in a large container.
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 6 FEB 11 by Lucretia
Mine is also sulking quite a bit--to the point where if it doesn't start doing a little better, it's got a date with the shovel. At this rate if I leave it alone it will gradually fade away.

Its parent, Scarlet Moss, did the same thing, unfortunately.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 6 FEB 11 by James Delahanty
I have had much better luck with Scarlet Moss and its progeny--Mel Hulse and Unconditional Love (a great rose by Paul Barden) in pots and containers than in the ground. In the ground they simply die away; in pots they thrive and bloom with almost no care whatsoever. If no care and concern is the price of great bloom, I am willing to pay it.
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 30 AUG 15 by Salix
Here, it is the reverse.
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most recent 4 MAR 14 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 26 SEP 12 by James Delahanty
The provenance for the cuttings supplied to the Sacramento Historic City Cemetery goes as follows:
I received the plant after a talk given to the Desert Rose Society some years ago; they received the plant/cuttings from Robert Rippetoe who received the plant personally from the hands of Ralph Moore.
Robert has grown both 'Old Blush' and 'Alice Hamilton' side by side and believes that while the plants are similar, they are not identical.
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Reply #1 of 9 posted 27 SEP 12 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Keep in mind that 'Alice Hamilton' was bred from 'Old Blush'. There is an obvious affinity but there also seem to be differences.

'Alice Hamilton' blossoms seem to have better substance and blush a bit more when exposed to sunlight.
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Reply #2 of 9 posted 27 SEP 12 by Lyn G
Robert..........

I looked up the lineage for 'Alice Hamilton' which lists 'Parson's Pink China' as the pollen parent. When I checked 'Parson's Pink China', I found that it was a synonym for 'Old Blush'. 'Old Blush' is not mentioned in the REFERENCES, which show other parentages, but my question is:

Would it be more informative to site users to use 'Old Blush' in the HMF lineage on the rose page with a NOTE explaining that 'Parson's Pink China' is a synonym for OB ?

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #3 of 9 posted 27 SEP 12 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
I know the names are synonymous. Perhaps others do not, so I see your point.

It seems to me the parentage should be stated as first supplied by the hybridizer for historical accuracy.

Popularity of names change over time.

IMO, It's up to us as researchers to recognize synonyms.

Best wishes, Robert
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Reply #4 of 9 posted 28 SEP 12 by billy teabag
Is there some discussion re the veracity of this identification? The early references describe a rose with a large, semi-double, bright velvety crimson bloom.
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Reply #5 of 9 posted 28 SEP 12 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Billy, whatever I have here, it doesn't match that description. I don't know where Sequoia received it from but looking at posted photos, it seems to be the same as that grown in Europe under the same name.
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Reply #6 of 9 posted 28 SEP 12 by James Delahanty
I think Robert is right regarding the need for researchers to be aware of the various synonyms; however, it seems to me that the service here is for both newbies and pros. At some time we are all newbies--(well, maybe not Robert) and need the additional information not to be misled.
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Reply #7 of 9 posted 28 SEP 12 by Lyn G
Hi JD...

I agree that the breeder/raiser of a rose should determine which name to use in the lineage of a rose and, if we have the REFERENCES available, that should be what shows on the rose page on HMF. Until we have a REFERENCE that specifically states the parentage with 'Old Blush' as the pollen parent, it might be best to leave it as it stands because the REFERENCES we do have don't report the same lineage.

If someone has a REFERENCE that we can add that is more specific, which I know may be hard to find, we can add it to the database.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #8 of 9 posted 29 SEP 12 by billy teabag
There is a Nabonnand study group in France that may have access to records.
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Reply #9 of 9 posted 4 MAR 14 by Rockhill
If you look up the Friends of Nabonnand roses website, you will see that they cannot verify that the rose currently being sold as 'Alice Hamilton' in Europe and the US is the original rose. it certainly does not match the description in the Nabonnand catalogue of 1904, which will shortly be posted on HMF.
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most recent 27 JUL 13 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 27 JUL 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
For all who knew Jim Delahanty, it is with great sadness I pass the information Jim passed away in his sleep this morning. The Rose World and all who knew and loved him have lost a giant. He was a keen rosarian, a wonderful educator, a great and valued friend who will long be missed.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 27 JUL 13 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Thanks Kim. He will be greatly missed.

Best wishes, Robert
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most recent 21 APR 13 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 21 APR 13 by Grntrz5
This looks like "Mountain Mignonette".
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 21 APR 13 by James Delahanty
Mike Lowe believed it to be 'Mignonette;' he transferred his stock to Ashdown. I bought it from Ashdown.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 21 APR 13 by James Delahanty
Mike Lowe believed it to be 'Mignonette;' he transferred his stock to Ashdown. I bought it from Ashdown.
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