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buckeyesouth
most recent 31 DEC SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 31 MAY 06 by Claire C

I read that Midnight Blue doesn't perform well grown on its own roots, but I have two own-root specimens that are thriving in my garden, putting out lots of growth, buds and bloom.  They were very small when planted last fall, and I wasn't sure they would even survive my zone 5/6 winter (they were put in the ground in late fall), but they rooted well, taking off like a rocket in the spring--they were practically the first roses to bloom in the entire garden.  So I would recommend them as own root plants... Claire, St Louis, Zone 5/6

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Reply #1 of 11 posted 17 JAN 11 by buckeyesouth
Thanks for this info. I was just debating whether to get it own root.
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Reply #2 of 11 posted 17 JAN 11 by buckeyesouth
And what has been your experience with this rose since several years ago?
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Reply #3 of 11 posted 17 JAN 11 by Lyn G
My experience with a budded 'Midnight Blue' in the mountains of northern California has been such that I am going to give it one more season to show me that it's worth keeping. It has been very slow to take off and the blooms fry in my summer heat.

I changed my feeding routine last year and all of my roses performed much better, so I want to give it another season before I pull out the shovel.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #4 of 11 posted 18 JAN 11 by buckeyesouth
Does this rose make a good cut? Ebb Tide is notorious for wilting quickly, and I understand that Midnight is from the same cross.
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Reply #5 of 11 posted 18 JAN 11 by Lyn G
I really don't know. I rarely cut roses to bring into the house. Also, with the high temps in my climate, the blooms from 'Midnight Blue' don't really last that long on the bush. I am hoping that if the plant is healthier with the new feeding program that might change, but, to be honest, I doubt it. I don't think dark colored roses are going to work in this garden unless they have very heavy petal substance.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #6 of 11 posted 15 NOV 14 by Michael Garhart
They both hate the sun. Ebb Tide does better in bright August sun, due to more and thicker petals, but they both suffer from those long summer days of heat.

This is typical of purple-red and blackened-red roses, however.

Of the newer purple roses I have grown, it has been Stormy Weather that has been the heat-tolerant. Sure, it is light on petals, but they are pretty strong petals. Its also the more prickly. It basically is like Westerland w/ purple blooms, lol.
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Reply #7 of 11 posted 17 MAY 17 by Lavenderlace
Here in Z8, I have several that have done very well own-root. The color is much darker and the fragrance stronger than Ebb Tide to compare, though the blooms are slightly smaller.
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Reply #8 of 11 posted 1 JUL by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Does midnight blue prefer sand over clay? How do you like its scent compared to Lagerfield (very nice scent in clay). Thanks.
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Reply #9 of 11 posted 1 JUL by Lavenderlace
Straw, I only had several of these grown in reddish but still sandy soil. I didn't put them in the vase so haven't smelled them as much as Lagerfeld, but would still have to prefer Lagerfeld if I had to choose. Both own-root.
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Reply #10 of 11 posted 1 JUL by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thank you. The purple/blue scent is elusive. Purple Wise Portia's scent is fantastic in cold weather, but lousy-clove in hot weather. Same with Deep Purple ... much better scent in cool weather, but weird-clove in hot weather. But Lagerfeld always smell good, regardless of the weather.
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Reply #11 of 11 posted 31 DEC by Michael Garhart
Ebb Tide is more consistently fragrant, but Midnight Blue is easier to grow (ET takes 2 years to become a full-fledged floribunda). I have each about 7 miles apart (different properties), and that is the main difference, except for petal count.
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most recent 1 AUG SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 8 SEP 05 by Gwendolyn Gallagher
This has been my first season with this rose, and I'm so disappointed. Almost every flower (and it has produced quite a few) has turned brown and rotted, either before or after opening. And it's not even a particularly damp year. Further, in the very few flowers which were not spoiled I have not been able to detect too much fragrance. I wanted to try Hawkeye Belle because it is supposed to withstand cold winters such as we have, but it seems it would only be suitable in a dry, rainless climate like California.
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 24 AUG 09 by TLMKozak
I have loved the delicate beauty of Hawkeye Belle in my zone 5 (borderline zone 4) garden. I have done very well with Buck roses and Explorers in my area. I would definitely recommend it. I have also found that fragrance can vary from rose to rose on the same plant and during the same season. Hope that helps someone.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 24 AUG 09 by Karen
This has been a near perfect rose for me. It does get thrips in the first flush which you can either sacrifice the first round of blooms or treat. I have grown it in less than six hours of sun and it still had flushes every six weeks. The flowers are a blush color and last long on the bush and the vase. Even in the shade the plant had no blackspot.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 1 AUG by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thanks for the info. on shade & and vase life.
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 1 MAR 13 by buckeyesouth
Same experience here in southern Ohio. Almost all the time the blossoms would ball or brown quickly. Probably too humid here. Rarely, one would have decent blooms if they were quickly cut. This one was shovel pruned.
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most recent 2 JUN 17 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 26 SEP 13 by cafeaulait
I'm surprised at Jasmina. I wanted her for years. I have one, a sturdy own root, and she's only been in my garden one long season (fall planted the year before).

But her foliage is not as clean as I'd expect from a modern Kordes rose. She gets a lot of Blackspot so far. Her vigor has not been great, either. I have her in a hot site with fairly difficult soil that can dry out, so maybe she just needs more pampering. Maybe she just needs to grow up?

I'm not rating her yet, but I just wanted to give a possible heads up to folks. She may not be a terribly easy rose like some are. Most Kordes are so simple here!
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 26 SEP 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
I think your clues are "hot site", "difficult soil" and the fact many climbers require three years (or longer) to come into their own. Before you're going to get growth and flowers, they require roots under them. Hot, dry, difficult soil issue inhibit root formation. Few roots means few nutrients which can lead to malnourished plants. Under nourished and water stressed plants routinely suffer disease issues. It can be extreme enough to force otherwise bullet proof roses to become infected. I'd suggest doing whatever you can to alleviate the heat, dry and "bad soil" issues the rose is experiencing and then give it three years (at least, perhaps longer if the difficulties it experiences can't be fixed) to perform as expected.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 2 JUN 17 by buckeyesouth
Grows vigorously here, and it requires a lot of pruning. Balls badly and clusters are so heavy they droop. In perfect weather (not humid, not too hot, not damp), it is a spectacle.
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most recent 2 JUN 17 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 12 MAY 06 by Unregistered Guest

Hi, How does your Colette grow? Vigorous? Lots of flowers? How often is the repeat? Is it Leggy? Would it bloom in lots of humidity in july and august? thanks so much..you have a fabulous rose list! terry
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Reply #1 of 8 posted 15 MAY 06 by Rupert, Kim L.

I've only been exposed to three plants of this rose, and all three were in one garden along the coast here in Southern California, where there is little difference between summer and winter temperatures (compared to those inland) and there is fairly constant humidity. Based upon how those three plants performed, I never wanted to grow it anywhere else. The petals were too soft to deal with the humidity, losing color and balling terribly in one day. There wasn't much fragrance (likely due to the conditions being too damp and cool), but what there was, deteriorated into a foul smelling glob of sogginess. The year they were in the garden, there was constant mildew with bursts of black spot and rust. Yes, I know climbers require up to three years to come into their own and develop into decent plants. All three of these were planted as fifteen gallon plants, with between seven and eight feet of growth on them, so they were fairly mature specimen. PERHAPS, they may have improved with time, but neither the home owner nor I was willing to put up with how disappointing this rose was in that location.


It's not the same color, but acceptable for this installation, and it's not as double, therefore not the same look as his wife originally wanted, but the three Collette were replaced with three Spice so Nice, which have been phenomenal! They're constantly in bloom; have good fragrance and are bullet proof in this location, with absolutely no disease, even though no cultural practices used on the Collettes were changed for Spice so Nice. The difference between the two roses performances are due entirely to the superior characteristics and suitability of Spice so Nice for these conditions.

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Reply #5 of 8 posted 3 JAN 13 by rose dabbler
Hi Kim,

What a coincidence...I was abbout to buy Colette to plant near my own Spice so Nice! As you know, the Spice So Nice has a much bolder coloration, and it IS healthy and beautiful and now around 18 feet tall (therefore I cannot bear ro get rid of it) but the orange tones in newly opened spice are stronger than I thought they would be when I planted it. (I love the softer two-day-old blooms.) I have an 1890's cottage, and love the old rose look...but with just a BIT more punch. I also have The Impressionist nearby. I thought the warm peachy pink of Colette between the two orange/gold/apricot climbers might bring some old-fashioned pink softness without clashing or contrasting too much. Can you think of another large bush/short climber similar in color and form to Colette that i might use that would do well in high humidity? I live in Western Maryland and the rose would be in a full-sun, south-facing, protected spot. I would be happy to e-mail you a photo (tried to upload photos to helpmefind but for some reason had trouble doing so.) THANK YOU!
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Reply #6 of 8 posted 3 JAN 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
Hi Cynthia, Colette may or may not do well where you are. I don't know how much of the issues here along the coast were humidity related and how much was the lack of heat. In Malibu where they grew, "hot" was high seventies, low eighties. What's "hot" where you are? Black spot resistance is something I can't comment on because they've identified FIVE strains of black spot across the US. The "brand" I have is likely not the same one you have so what remains clean here may collapse under that pressure for you.

You might look at something like Westerland or Autumn Sunset. Not as double, but durable in most places and in similar coloring with great scent. They can be grown as shrubs or, left lightly to unpruned, develop into shorter climbers. Garden Sun might also be something which might be suitable. Conard Pyle, its introducer, states it has good disease resistance and cold hardiness.

I am leaning more toward the recent introductions rather than OGRs because they are easily available budded, so you'll have a leg up on growth and they may be more disease resistant and cold hardy in your climate. I hope it helps! Good luck.
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Reply #7 of 8 posted 31 MAR 16 by LaurelZ
When you replace any rose it get less fungal the first year. The real test would be how does Spice So Nice preform long term? Spice So Nice is a completely different color and not as pretty as Colette. And my Colette does great in San Francisco. In fact, it has much less fungal then any other of my roses in San Francisco. I do spray, but still Colette was the best performer. All of them were sprayed, but only Colette looks completely clean in the leaves with no signs of rust, black spot or powdery mildew.
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Reply #2 of 8 posted 28 MAR 07 by eve
I've got two Colette and the places they are planted at are very different in soil quality. The better the better! The one's planted in a deeper soil is much more vigorous than the other.Still; even the one planted in the poor soil is a beautiful bush of 5 feet heights. Its secon flush is less generous than the firts, yet... Its a robust beautiful rose with very charming, delicate colour. I am glad t ohave her in my garden, even though I prefer old roses, she has practically all those qualities..Grettings, Eve
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Reply #3 of 8 posted 5 MAR 08 by Unregistered Guest
mine is about 4yrs and it rarely bloom. I planted on the other side of the rose arbor, it recieved plenty of water and sunshine, but I thinks I only see it bloom once. I wonder what I have done wrong?
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Reply #4 of 8 posted 5 MAR 08 by Henrique Rodrigues Vivián
I'm glad you are going well.
Henrique
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Reply #8 of 8 posted 2 JUN 17 by buckeyesouth
Very disappointed in this rose. It wilts quickly in the heat and also dislikes humidity. A so-so in terms of vigor. It has managed to survive and bloom regularly, but requires perfect weather to make a display.
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