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Carlene
most recent 1 AUG SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 25 AUG 09 by Carlene
I live in Houston where the sun is very strong, and I have Oklahoma planted in a pot under the outer branches of an Oak tree. It gets maybe 3-4 hours of sun a day, and it still blooms!!! Today I cut a lovely long stemmed beauty and it is in a vase on my kitchen counter. Who knew this rose was shade tolerant too??? Wow.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 25 AUG 09 by HMF Admin
Thanks Carlene !
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 1 AUG by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thank you for the info. on shade-tolerance.
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most recent 17 APR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 15 MAY 10 by Carlene
Does anyone know how shade tolerant this rose is? Thank-you.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 16 MAY 10 by Jeff Britt
I've seen Moonlight growing in southern England grown in part shade doing very well in both June and August.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 17 APR by Gdisaz10
It is susceptible to powdery mildew in the shade positions
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most recent 21 JUL 15 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 19 AUG 09 by Carlene
My Mrs. B.R. Cant has grown to over 10 ft. tall by 10 ft. wide also. When I planted it, the spot seemed large enough. Now - whenever my family mows the yard they get stuck with 1/2 inch thorns that rip their clothes and hurt like the dickens! I was impressed by the picture of Devoniensis (posted by Jeri & Clay Jennings) that apparently had been pruned into a tree. Today I finished pruning Mrs. B.R. Cant into a 10 ft. tall, 2-trunk tree. I'll keep you posted on what develops. It is very pretty - the blossoms hang down - just lovely.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 21 JUL 15 by boopie
Do you have a picture of this bush now that it has been many years since pruning it?
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most recent 20 JUN 14 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 6 JUL 10 by Carlene
I had this rose growing and blooming in 4 hrs sun a day in a pot and the blooms always came out perfect. It had no disease problems. So this rose is shade-tolerant.
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Reply #1 of 9 posted 7 JUL 10 by HMF Admin
We noted the shade tolerance in the plant's description but we're hesitant to label it as disease resistant based on just your experience as that may be a result of your particular gardening practices. Anyone else care to comment on how disease resistant this rose is for them?
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Reply #2 of 9 posted 6 JUL 11 by evan500
I live in New York state (Westchester County). I've had Black Magic for a little over a year (I planted it in about June of 2010). This year I am noticing more black spot then I did last year. I'd say my three foot high plant has lost close to half its leaves. I don't use commercial fungicides in my garden. Last year I often used the common baking soda solution to combat black spot, but my sense is that it helps some, but is no great cure. This year the only thing I have been doing is removing diseased foliage, including fallen dead leaves.

I do love the gorgeous red black flowers, but if I continue to see this level of black spot, I probably won't keep this plant. Since taking a class last year on "going green with roses" I am moving towards old garden varieties which, in general, seem to be more disease resistant. It is very disappointing, but in my experience, a majority of hybrid tea roses when grown in New York's hot humid summers are afflicted with black spot.
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Reply #3 of 9 posted 8 JUL 11 by Jay-Jay
You might try this mixture from a recipe of the Rosarium of Winschoten: for every 5 liter=>
10 grams of magnesiasulphate
10 grams of spraying-sulphur
10 grams of Algeco (concentrated Algae-extract)
35 ml of Vital (a leaf fertilizer)
25 grams of baking soda
25 ml of sunseedoil
1.25 ml of (dishwashing) detergent
For me it works (but not for the rose Sunrise/Freisinger Morgenr├Âte)
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Reply #4 of 9 posted 8 JUL 11 by evan500
Thanks, I appreciate the info!
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Reply #5 of 9 posted 19 JUN 14 by Michael Garhart
Oh, there are more than just OGRs that fit the bill now for "going green".
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Reply #6 of 9 posted 19 JUN 14 by Jay-Jay
Could You explain the abbreviation OGR?
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Reply #7 of 9 posted 19 JUN 14 by Michael Garhart
"Since taking a class last year on "going green with roses" I am moving towards old garden varieties which, in general, seem to be more disease resistant. It is very disappointing, but in my experience, a majority of hybrid tea roses when grown in New York's hot humid summers are afflicted with black spot."

OGR is the American abbreviation for old garden roses.
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Reply #8 of 9 posted 20 JUN 14 by Jay-Jay
Thank You! And good luck with Your new insight.
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Reply #9 of 9 posted 20 JUN 14 by Michael Garhart
Oh, I was just quoting what I was referencing. It is not my quote :] I mostly grow non-OGRs resistant to most blackspots. For example, Yellow Submarine.
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