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goncmg
most recent 14 JUL SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 20 APR 14 by goncmg
In 1968 NEWS debuted, beet-root purple was NEW, unusual..........50 years later it still is. 14 years later/32 years ago beet root purple hit AARS with this one...............the plant IS strong, the blooms are big, much bigger than News, more formal, the color deeper, the petals crisper (a trait White Masterpiece seems to pass on)............but yes, must concur with a prior post: BLACKSPOT! This color just falls prey. But if beet root purple rings your bell, this one is still worth a shot as it will blackspot endlessly, you may have a naked bush much of the growing season if you live east of the Mississippi, but the blackspot somehow here is never fatal...........Intrigue just keeps on keeping on...........another varfiety where there just really isn't anything like it and I've always debated if it won AARS because it deserved it or because Warriner was on a "streak" and Paradise had been such a mauve/mauve-blend success a few years prior..............or maybe a meld of both?
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 19 APR 16 by Michael Garhart
lol I was so excited when I ordered this rose. Then Purple Heart came out, and Intrique went straight the compost. And I was very glad about that! Now I have Ebb Tide, which has its faults (turns neon violet in high heat, and an awkward grower), but it works just fine. Purple Heart was a super easy grower. But I left it due to a move.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 14 JUL by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Nearby rose park has a huge bed of many Intrigues, glorious in hot & dry early Sept., but blackspot-fest in rainy spring .. so they got rid of the entire bed. Intrigue (grafted-on-Dr.Huey) needs high-pH tap-water to stay healthy, and CANNOT handle acidic rain. Saw Intrigue with 4 buds, and 100% healthy in a dinky pot at Walmart in hot & dry August, watered with our town pH 9 tap-water. The color is very purple with high-potassium fertilizer & scent is spicy-good.
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most recent 25 MAY SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 16 MAR 13 by goncmg
Have grown this one off and on since I was a child (it was AARS my birth year) and can say it has never truly "let me down" but never, EVER has impressed me. Quite fragrant. Blooms a lot. Unique foliage. But the plant isn't particularly robust in my experiences, is rather tender in 6a, and is no better than average and actually usually under-par with disease resistance............

What "bewitches" me in 2013 is how for the past 5 or 6 years this seems to be everywhere?! The discount chain stores, the hardware stores, as a band, as a custom root, as a budded 2 year field grown #1...........a no better than average medium pink from 1967? How and why? Sweet Surrender from 1983, also AARS is VERY CLOSE to this one in my opinion and although STILL not a great rose, probably MORE fragrant and a little lustier a grower. Sweet Surrender has a dahlia-llike form but it isn't like Bewitched set the shows on fire! Yet nobody at all seems to be offering Sweet Surrender while I am pretty sure I can buy Bewitched in the McDonald's drive thru..........

Just speaks to the randomness of marketing in general, roses in particular, and this endlessly intrigues me.

No, not a BAD rose. Just also not a very GOOD rose. A DECENT rose. A FINE rose. Arguably the BEST of a weak AARS year but how the others from 1967 are done for and this one is surviving tremendously truly does escape me..............
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Reply #1 of 9 posted 17 MAR 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
It smells, it's pretty and it's pink. That is what the majority of people who come in and ask any questions about roses usually ask about. I agree about Sweet Surrender. I love the odd form, wonderful scent and can even tolerate the weak, nodding "necks".
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Reply #2 of 9 posted 17 MAR 13 by goncmg
Kim, I DO wonder what came over that AARS panel in 1983. Sweet Surrender was such an unlikely choice......would have been more "fitting" years earlier and actually more recently................back to Bewitched, I own all the annuals for the most part and it DIDN'T take the world by storm. It WAS widely grown, all AARS were then (sigh)....but the ratings were actually on the LOW side.....and lots of talk about the scraggly bush and the crooked peduncle/zig zag trait in growth...........I grow Gay Princess from 67 and actually think it is a pretty good rose. The color is so CLEAR. Personally I think GP is the best of the weak 4 from 67............Roman Holiday! Eh???
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Reply #3 of 9 posted 17 MAR 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
Much of the time, the contract growers who produce these bare roots you find all over (not the "major producers") don't base their selections on ratings. If the name is recognizable, it is easy to produce and enough bud wood is available somewhere to be able to produce it in sufficient quantities to meet their production needs, it gets budded. I've encountered many odd varieties in these types over the years. At least they've moved forward some decades. I used to find Lowell Thomas and Mme. Chang Kai-shek all over. At least now, it's Golden Glow!
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Reply #4 of 9 posted 17 MAR 13 by goncmg
Love it! And get it! Just so CRAZY how "that wood" is out there-----where??? Ya know? WHY? Look at UC Davis, and conversely look at whatever flopped in 1996 and just went off patent.........LOVE from 1980 is also everywhere anymore but somehow with that one, from "my" perspective, I sort of applaud but not sure what the "mass" appeal would be................MOJAVE appeared, suddenly, last summer at Meijers here in Ohio and Lowe's here tripped into a retro-collectors dream in Columbus last summer with beat-up, sad, somewhat salvagable pallets of pre-potted stressed-out plants of PROMISE, HEIRLOOM, JADIS, PROUD LAND, EVENING STAR...............all true to name! So odd..........
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Reply #5 of 9 posted 23 FEB 15 by Michael Garhart
Bewitched is oddly healthy here.You will see it in older homes, where you will often see Tropicana. It seems to be a love and leave it variety up here. I kind of like it for all of the wrong reasons. Its HUGE, and the foliage is neat, but... I would never own it. Its pink as pink gets. Its, again, HUGE. And the stems make my hands sore looking at how they have to be pruned every winter. They are THICK. But, yeah, I think even the form looks cool. I'll stick to the other pink oldie, with a much warmer color and medium-sized stems, 'Touch of Class'.
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Reply #6 of 9 posted 23 FEB 15 by Michael Garhart
Bewitched is oddly healthy here.You will see it in older homes, where you will often see Tropicana. It seems to be a love and leave it variety up here. I kind of like it for all of the wrong reasons. Its HUGE, and the foliage is neat, but... I would never own it. Its pink as pink gets. Its, again, HUGE. And the stems make my hands sore looking at how they have to be pruned every winter. They are THICK. But, yeah, I think even the form looks cool. I'll stick to the other pink oldie, with a much warmer color and medium-sized stems, 'Touch of Class'.
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Reply #7 of 9 posted 24 MAY by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Agree with what goncmg wrote: "But the plant isn't particularly robust in my experiences, is rather tender in 6a," Bewitched died in its first dry winter (no snow) as a tiny-own-root in my zone 5a. I winter-protected it well, but it didn't make it through the winter like my 15+ Austin own-root roses .. these have deeper roots to survive dry winters.
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Reply #8 of 9 posted 24 MAY by Michael Garhart
Yeah, I don't think it is meant for colder areas. Half of it is from a very cold-tender line related to Golden Wave. The other half is Queen Elizabeth.

'Aunt Honey' may be a good option for "typical pink, tea form" type in colder areas.
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Reply #9 of 9 posted 25 MAY by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thank you !!
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most recent 17 MAY SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 27 FEB 12 by goncmg
A shame this rose is barely available if at all......the blooms are a little small, the plant tends to grow wider than tall, and the form is not for exhibition but the color is lovely! Always reminded me of "fruit on the bottom" yogurt in boysenberry or some sort of berry! The scent is insane, strong and hard and makes your mouth water. Grew this one for 10 years in the 80's until we moved and by then it was not easily found. Scent seems to be "in" now, again/finally and the namesake has always been well-esteemed. Maybe someday this one will re-appear. It is a nice, good rose.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 17 MAY by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
The name is hard to remember, perhaps that's the downfall.
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most recent 2 MAY SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 13 APR 15 by Yankee Doodle Stevie
A classic deep bright yellow that does not seem to be around as much these days. A shame.

Plant is rather short but fairly free blooming. Among the earlier in season bloomers too. The color at it's best is among the truest deep yellows I have seen.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 6 APR 16 by goncmg
This one and King's Ransom are both 1962 I believe. KR was AARS. In all truth, other than Sunsprite from 1973 and an FL to boot, 50-60 years later no GREAT medium-to-deep yellow HT has appeared since and Summer Sunshine is really as cooperative, eager, hardy and attractive as it gets. Oregold from 75 is a mess with blackspot as is King's Ransom.....Midas Touch, still very much around, dies if you open the refridgerator around it............Summer Sunshine is one that I grew once, thought it better than expected.............probably under-rated for its time............between Summer Sunshine and King's Ransom I would have voted Summer Sunshine as the AARS winner....
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 2 MAY by Yankee Doodle Stevie
Hi goncmg! Our old Summer Sunshine was starting to get woody and also suffered from a gopher attack. Though it is still hanging in there, I decided to pick up a new plant, as insurance, upon seeing them in late winter. Less than two months in the ground and newb SS is over a foot & a half tall, full of leaves from top to bottom, and has given us six nice blooms with five more buds ready to burst. It truly is a great yellow rose imo and seems to be making a deserved comeback at the big box and hardware stores.

For yellows, we had to look backward in time to get enough good prospects when originally planning the garden. Lowell Thomas does quite well for us. It's mannerly, blooms early, and smells nice too. Soeur Thérèse is an old pernetiana with no form but is a blooming fool. Though a decade newer than SS, Allspice is a massive plant here. With huge canes that fill with sunny golden flowers. It's rudely healthy, though not for a small spot. Buccaneer grows well here too, but one ten foot tall yellow is enough for me. :) St.Patrick does very well in this high desert climate. As does Kordes Limelight. But both, especially St.Pat, tend more toward chartreuse than medium-deep yellow. Though I don't currently grow them, I know people in this area that have had luck with New Day and Helmut Schmidt.
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