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most recent 13 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 7 SEP 16 by BarbaraG SE Virginia
Disappointing in public garden here in hot, humid SE Virginia. Poor bloom, lot of dieback despite mild winter, and extensive defoliation. It was chosen for an organic rose garden; we have yet to find a really good white.
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Reply #1 of 7 posted 7 SEP 16 by Give me caffeine
Which ones have you tried?
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Reply #2 of 7 posted 8 SEP 16 by BarbaraG SE Virginia
We have tried Flower Carpet White, Rugosa Blanc Double de Coubert, and Marie Daly (blush). I need to correct myself and say that Lions Rose (Lions Fairy Tale) is highly satisfactory; but with an apricot blush in the center the effect is more cream colored than pure white. Spice is wonderfully healthy and an almost continuous bloomer but again, not pure white.
Souvenir de St. Ann's has proven very shade tolerant; rebloom is only fair. We have lost some SDSA to freeze damage. (We also lost an entire group of Mystic Beauty which is a very pale pink, like SDLM)
The current design doesn't allow room for Darlow's Enigma or Ducher, both of which are a very pure white.
The gazebo in the center of the garden provides a pop of pure white; it is surrounded by Peach Drift. It's used for weddings so there are no climbers on it, to provide good sight lines all round.
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 8 SEP 16 by Give me caffeine
Pascali is supposed to be bulletproof, if you can live with the lack of scent.

I'm currently trying White Ensign in the subtropics. It's looking promising, but I haven't had it long enough to give good feedback.
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Reply #4 of 7 posted 9 SEP 16 by Nastarana
Have you considered 'White Medilland'?, which is pure white and, in VA, should be an almost continuous bloomer?
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Reply #5 of 7 posted 15 APR 17 by BarbaraG SE Virginia
We are looking for a bushy chest-high shrub which is highly blackspot resistant. Currently we are considering the Kordes floribunda 'Polar Express'. Fortunately ARE has it. I am hoping to see Polar Express in a public garden somewhere.
MK was a disaster for us and we have at least eight of them in a very prominent position.
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Reply #6 of 7 posted 13 days ago by Michael Garhart
My favorite so far is Lullaby, if you can get it. Mine is growing fine next to a pine tree, which nothing else thrives next to lol.
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Reply #7 of 7 posted 13 days ago by Kathy Strong's Del Cerro Garden
I also like Lullaby, but if you want big, like big enough for a pergola, then go with Darlow's Enigma -- It's excellent. But it does set hips and therefore best blooming will be if someone takes off the hips occasionally.
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most recent 2 SEP SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 29 JAN 15 by Give me caffeine
Mistydowns are stocking this one now

http://mistydowns.com.au/plant_display/display/2494-cammnethan-house-red-tea

Also, I'm no expert but the Tea rose book describes this one as tall and upright, which in their parlance means around 2 metres or so, while descriptions of 'Princesse de Sagan' say it is a small bush of up to 80 cm.
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Reply #1 of 12 posted 29 JAN 15 by Margaret Furness
David Elliott's photo of a bush labelled P de S at Lyon looks more like the 2m, but of course it may not be correctly identified.
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Reply #2 of 12 posted 29 JAN 15 by Jane Z
Height, width & depth of between 1.8-2m would be expected for "Camnethan Cherry Red" in most areas where Teas grow. For whatever reason, sizes given in some Australian catalogues do not reflect the growth that 'local' conditions will produce. Photo's taken July 2006 central west NSW Australia
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Reply #3 of 12 posted 29 JAN 15 by Give me caffeine
Yes I've noticed that about sizes in catalogues. Mistydowns often seems to give sizes that make sense for a youngish bush in a cooler climate, or for a heavily pruned bush, but when other sources are checked they'll often indicate rampant growth and up to twice the size, depending.

I have a suspicion that some nurseries rely mainly on customers who have suburban gardens, and don't want to scare off the punters, so give sizes that indicate what it can be kept to without killing it instead of sizes that the thing will naturally aim for if given half a chance.
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Reply #9 of 12 posted 3 JAN 16 by billy teabag
Worth a thousand words. Brilliant! Thanks Jane.
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Reply #4 of 12 posted 29 JAN 15 by Patricia Routley
Why are you connecting these two different roses?
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Reply #5 of 12 posted 29 JAN 15 by Margaret Furness
A rose identical with "Camnethan Cherry Red" was seen in the US (by one or more of the Tealadies, as far as I remember) labelled 'Princesse de Sagan'. I hope they will comment further.
As you know, the rose sold in Aus as P de S is incorrect. So photos of P de S from Australia should be disregarded, really.
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Reply #6 of 12 posted 29 JAN 15 by Give me caffeine
IanM's comment below, Discussion id : 57-888, mentions he thinks it is P de S. I saw his comment when posting mine.
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Reply #7 of 12 posted 30 JAN 15 by Patricia Routley
If you listen hard enough, I am sure you will find 365 different opinions from all over the world on a rose.
I try to form my own opinions and it seems to me that the 'Princesse de Sagan' references for 1887, 1898, 1906, 1907, 1916 and 1921 all point to this original rose being a small bush.

My 15-year old, unpruned "Camnethan Cherry Red" on its own roots is about 2 metres high.
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Reply #8 of 12 posted 30 JAN 15 by Margaret Furness
Jedmar's comment on his photos of Princesse de Sagan ex Loubert are of interest - maybe mislabelled, maybe Prof Ganiviat (which is what the Aus-sold rose is considered most likely to be). So I wonder if the tall rose labelled P de S, photographed by David Elliot at Lyon, was from the same source.
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Reply #10 of 12 posted 31 AUG by Aussie rose lover
Margret you mention Professeur Graniviat as the likely contender for what many are calling Princesses de Sagan .IN this you are quite correct I believe .The Professeur is A cherry pink/ red and like many ,doesn't tend to have the white stripe that occasionally comes in the red varieties. Growth habitats are slightly different but you would need to be familiar with both to appreciate this. On the whole the Professeur is the slightly better rose I feel. But that is just me and I tend to be fairly tough and if I don't like something I either won't grew it or it gets pulled out and binned. I have several new roses which after four years are about to meet the bin.I wonder why they were released as the deleted ones even if they had black spot were still better plants.
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Reply #11 of 12 posted 1 SEP by Margaret Furness
I'm increasingly of the opinion that there are too many roses.
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Reply #12 of 12 posted 2 SEP by HubertG
Margaret, LOL!
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most recent 28 JUN SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 1 JUN by Kim97056
Can anyone help me Id this rose? It was my great-grandmothers, she was born in 1916. I think it’s 60-70+ years old, and my great grandpa bought it for her as an anniversary gift. It’s been transplanted probably 8-10 times, she moved it to each new house so it was quite important to her.
The rose is grafted.
It has 25 petals.
Beautiful strong fragrance. If the breeze is right, I can smell it on the patio
I’ve had success at getting a cutting to root so now I have two.
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Reply #1 of 8 posted 1 JUN by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Could be, 'Talisman'.
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Reply #2 of 8 posted 1 JUN by Margaret Furness
I wondered about that too, but the Talisman description says "Thornless or almost".
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Reply #3 of 8 posted 1 JUN by Robert Neil Rippetoe
'Talisman' has thorns, (prickles). They are moderately well spaced as compared to many.

You will note, "Thornless or almost", is almost like default setting here at HMF.

I don't know why so many are listed this way but I've noted in most cases it is incorrect.
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Reply #4 of 8 posted 1 JUN by Kim97056
My rose is very lightly thorned.
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Reply #5 of 8 posted 1 JUN by Margaret Furness
I no longer have Talisman, but the prickles on the photo I posted are similar to those on your rose - some almost straight, some slightly down-curved.
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Reply #6 of 8 posted 1 JUN by Robert Neil Rippetoe
I'm fairly certain your rose is, 'Talisman'.

It was very popular, sold far and wide, about the time your GGrandmother would have acquired it.
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Reply #7 of 8 posted 2 JUN by Give me caffeine
Umm, yes. It seems to usually mean "Thornless, or almost, when compared to horribly spiky monsters like Mermaid or Rose primula, and if you are feeling exceptionally charitable".
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Reply #8 of 8 posted 28 JUN by Dusan
It also look's like "Fred Edmunds".

http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.2850.0&tab=36
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most recent 27 JUN SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 4 SEP 16 by Give me caffeine
Just a thought, but since it's known that Clark used Bardou Job as one of Black Boy's parents, it looks an awful lot like he may have used it for one of Restless' parents too. There appear to be quite a few similarities.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 4 SEP 16 by Patricia Routley
Agree
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 27 JUN by billy teabag
Was just thinking the same. Thornlessness (mostly) is another snap.
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