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Andrew from Dolton
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 2 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Does anyone know if Rosa multiflora seed needs to be stratified first or can germinate without cold treatment?
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Reply #1 of 5 posted yesterday by jedmar
Rosa multiflora grows in 300-2000m in China, so it would seem to need cold periods. In USA it is an invasive neophyte in a band from Kentucky to the East Coast. I found this text on Bugwood Wiki:
"In eastern North America, multiflora rose is abundant from the Great Plains (where the species has been planted as wind breaks) to the east coast. It occurs from northern Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia in the south, north to the New England coast, central New York, southern Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. It occurs only as plantings south of central Georgia, probably because of the lack of cold temperatures needed to stimulate seed germination. The plant’s northern distribution is limited by its sensitivity to severe cold temperatures."
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Reply #2 of 5 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
Thank you Jedmar, the seeds are now in my refrigerator. The seeds are from a particularly deep pink flowered variety of the above dwarf sport.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
When I was in Switzerland, some years ago, on the train from Zurich to Kreuzlingen there were white rambler type roses growing wild on the embankments, sprawling on the ground. Would that have been multiflora?
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Reply #4 of 5 posted yesterday by jedmar
I must admit I have no idea! Rosa multiflora is not an invasive neophyte in Switzerland. Could it have been plantings of Rosa rugosa alba?
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Reply #5 of 5 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
No, it definitely had stems trailing on the ground and panicles of smallish flowers, maybe too prostrate to be multiflora.
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most recent 2 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 2 DEC by NikosR
How can one remove spent blooms without deadheading? I wonder..
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Reply #1 of 13 posted 2 DEC by Andrew from Dolton
Try a leaf blower, It works quite well on roses and camellias too.
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Reply #2 of 13 posted 2 DEC by NikosR
It doesn't work if one wants to encourage re-bloom..
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Reply #3 of 13 posted 2 DEC by Jay-Jay
Try this: Look up deadheading in the Glossary in the left column. There You might find the answer to Your question. And look at the photo's tab too: http://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/gl.php?n=297&tab=36
Pluck the spent flower like an apple (with stem) at the right place, where there is a weak point, and the flower-stem thickens and later on forms cork when rejecting/getting rid of the spent flower or hip.
And take a look this picture of Étoile de Hollande Cl. as an example.
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Reply #4 of 13 posted 3 days ago by NikosR
I'm well aware of this. How does that answer my orginal question which is in reference to the details in the rose entry? How can one remove spent blooms without deadheading one way or the other? In my book removing spent blooms = deadheading
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Reply #5 of 13 posted 3 days ago by Margaret Furness
I guess the description means deadhead (remove what might make a hip) - blasting dead petals with a leaf-blower might not do that.
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Reply #7 of 13 posted 3 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
The leaf-blower will only remove dead petals, I think the only way to remove what might make a hip is to do so as Jay-Jay wrote, that is by hand.
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Reply #6 of 13 posted 3 days ago by Jay-Jay
Cutting the whole plant to the ground? ;-)
Maybe Your question isn't clear to the reader.
You might explain/describe what You mean or want to.
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Reply #8 of 13 posted 3 days ago by NikosR
The entry for this particular rose mentions amongst other things: 'Remove spent blooms to encourage re-bloom... ...Do not dead head'. I suggest one can't have one's cake and eat it too.
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Reply #9 of 13 posted 3 days ago by Jay-Jay
Oh, now I understand... those lines/advices contradict each-other.
This would be an issue for the administrator, c.q. Patricia Routley.
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Reply #10 of 13 posted 2 days ago by Patricia Routley
c.q.? I am but one of the, admittedly very few, administrators Jay-Jay.
I don't grow this rose and more's the pity.....so I have added a few more references to find out. There are two U.K. references which say there is some autumn repeat, so perhaps if one did dead-head, it might produce more of an autumn crop. It apparently doesn't repeat as a rule. I have removed the "Remove spent blooms to encourage rebloom" line.

Taking a clue from the 2000 reference, as it is a very thorny rose perhaps our description might need some extra words - No need to dead head unless you have chain mesh skin.
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Reply #11 of 13 posted 2 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
It's interesting that the various references contradict each other, some say not recurrent or does not reflower whilst others say good second crop or another goodly flush. Perhaps it has something to do with growing conditions or cultivation? And good luck with deadheading a rose that grows 3.5m x 3.5m however you decide to do it!
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Reply #12 of 13 posted 2 days ago by Jay-Jay
In Dutch it means A or B. I meant an administrator and maybe in this case Patricia.
I apologize for the misunderstanding of the English meaning of c.q..
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Reply #13 of 13 posted 2 days ago by Patricia Routley
Andrew - Am grinning.

Jay-Jay - I can't speak/read a word of Dutch so you are way ahead of me.
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most recent 3 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 4 days ago by Daved
Rose Listing Omission

Lady Dynevor

I understand from local notes that Reverend Alan Cheales, (the first vicar of Brockham Church in Brockham, Surrey, and namesake to a rose bred by George Paul), hybridized a rose that he named Lady Dynevor. I can find no other reference to the plant, living or lost. Any ideas? I am the gardener for Brockham Church, and would love to find either a specimen of the plant or, if that's no longer possible, at least a glimpse into it's history. Thanks!
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 3 days ago by Patricia Routley
Some dates might help. I understand the Rev. Cheales was there between 1859-1892 so we would be looking for a late 1800s rose. I have had a search of my Australian literature but found nothing. Was there an actual Lady Dynevor? (My silly brain keeps bringing up a fictitious name of ....die never.... and I wonder if there is a local tenacious species rose still growing in Surrey)
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 3 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
I don't know if this is a help at all, http://www.thepeerage.com/i1207.htm#s15613 and if you look-up Baron Dynevor on Wikipedia there are family connections to Guildford.
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most recent 4 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 4 days ago by Margaret Furness
It goes nicely with its companions.
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 4 days ago by Patricia Routley
Thanks Margaret. As long as there is not another slithery companion going Sisssss at me. I really like bare beds so I can see any snakes.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 4 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Patricia what is the pretty pink flower complementing the rose so well? I have grass snakes, lizards and slow worms living under sheets of corrugated iron that I've put down for them but like most of British wildlife they are rather drab and boring.
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 4 days ago by Patricia Routley
Some sort of Verbena I think. I've had it now for 21 years and it likes the acid soil conditions here. It came as a passalong when I also acquired "Beryl Turner's Tiny White" - see that reference.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 4 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Thank you Patricia, I thought it was a verbena, just wondered if you knew which one so I could try and get seed, it would be great for bedding out. I like the phrase "It came as a passalong...", just as Verbena bonariensis and Viola labradorica piggy-backed their way into my garden in the pots of other plants.
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