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Andrew from Dolton
most recent 8 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 8 days ago by jedmar
I see the fat hips of Rosa dumalis on your photo. In a garden I have recently seen a Rosa canina growing together with another which I think is Rosa dumalis. The hips are 3cm long and 7 cm in diameter. This is quite a variable rose, but are the photos similar to your plant?
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 8 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
It certainly looks like it. Persistent calyxes and vicious sharp hooked prickles. It is similar to rubiginosa with flowers much darker than Rosa canina but lacks apple scented new shoots. In spring and summer the leaves have a blueish look, a bit like an alba rose.
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most recent 8 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 9 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Why is this rose listed as a sport of 'New Dawn' when it is actually a hybrid?
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 9 days ago by jedmar
According to "Modern Roses" it is a hybrid between 'V for Victory' and apparently a pollen mix between two sports of 'New Dawn' and 'Copper Glow'. Difficult to say more without having access to the patent.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 9 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Doesn't that make 'Lourdes' a hybrid and not a sport?
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 9 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
It is listed as a sport on the 'New Dawn' profile along with 'Probuzení' and 'Weisse New Dawn'. 'Lourdes' is listed as a Hybrid-Tea whilst the other two are sports and listed as Hybrid Wichuranas, like 'New Dawn'.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 9 days ago by Patricia Routley
I am not sure why 'Lourdes' is listed as a sport on the 'New Dawn' profile. It should be a hybrid. Perhaps Admin might like to take a look.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 8 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
It is interesting because of the discussion about the repeat flowering ability of 'New Dawn'. The two sports of 'New Dawn', 'Probuzení' and 'Weisse New Dawn' only have "Occasional repeat later in the season" whilst 'New Dawn' itself is supposed to, "Blooms in flushes throughout the season".
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most recent 9 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 8 SEP by Nastarana
Which of the 'Westerland' sport family has the best color?

Which has color which is clear, not dull, and doesn't turn pinkish?

I have read that 'Westerland' is excellent for cold climates, repeats and is fragrant, but I have never cared for the color.
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Reply #1 of 10 posted 13 days ago by Jay-Jay
Maybe more fun in sowing Your own Westerland seedlings (most of the outcome is splendid) than buy a sport?
In my humble opinion, some of my seedlings are way better than the mother/hip-parent Westerland.
Better scented, longer lasting, nicer foliage an better growing habit/better suited as a climber.
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 13 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
The plant Jay-Jay gave me is a most satisfactory pink/orange/red colour and very healthy too.
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Reply #3 of 10 posted 13 days ago by Jay-Jay
Please take a look at my this years' seedlings in my journal and my earlier seedlings of Westerland at my breeder page.
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Reply #4 of 10 posted 13 days ago by Nastarana
Your seedlings look splendid. For me to grow some I would have to buy a 'Westerland', which I don't really want to do.
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Reply #5 of 10 posted 13 days ago by Jay-Jay
This-one might come to The States with Becky and John Hook from Roseraie du Désert: https://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.69439.2
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Reply #9 of 10 posted 10 days ago by Nastarana
I love your 'Noortje'. Now, that shows good color and good shape as well, IMO.

I don't think the Hooks have made it to the US yet.
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Reply #10 of 10 posted 9 days ago by Jay-Jay
And I'll have to send them another Noortje.
Thank You for Your kind compliment
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Reply #6 of 10 posted 13 days ago by Jay-Jay
Or just ask someone in the USA, that grows this rose, if they would be so kind to send You some (OP) hips.
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Reply #7 of 10 posted 13 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Are seeds restricted by importing laws?
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Reply #8 of 10 posted 12 days ago by Jay-Jay
In the USA yes!
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most recent 9 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 23 MAR by Andrew from Dolton
Beautiful.
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Reply #1 of 12 posted 31 MAR by HubertG
Andrew, thank you. It really is a beautifully formed rose. That was a rainy day - bad for Alexander Hill Gray if it hasn't opened yet because it balls a bit, but good for the lighting for photography.
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Reply #2 of 12 posted 31 MAR by Andrew from Dolton
I'm very envious of all these Tea roses that everyone in Australia seem to grow so well and I can only dream of.
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Reply #3 of 12 posted 7 SEP by HubertG
Andrew, with the hot weather that you've had there this summer maybe you could try a few out for next year. :-)
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Reply #4 of 12 posted 7 SEP by Andrew from Dolton
Yes HubertG it's certainly worth thinking about. I can grow 'Hume's Blush Tea-Scented China' reasonably well but it has to be grown against the house for extra warmth and covered with a big sheet of glass from November to April to keep the worst of the wet away. Its neighbour is what is being sold by Beales as 'Park's Yellow' but will probably turn out to be 'Fée Opale' and that has made masses of growths this year (mostly in the last four weeks) and looks very healthy. I've just ordered 'Louis VIX' which will need cosseting, but yes, if you can guarantee a few more summers like this year then I'll certainly be up for trying some teas. 'Sanguinea' and 'Archduke Charles' grow and flower after a fashion but are very weak.
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Reply #5 of 12 posted 7 SEP by HubertG
I was just reading in the old Rosen-Zeitung which teas survived well through German winters. Mme Lombard was one, and Dr. Grill. I'll try to find it again and post it. I do remember them saying Francis Dubreuil suffered badly, and Maman Cochet had little damage. I think a lot of the Teas are cold hardier than often thought.
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Reply #6 of 12 posted 7 SEP by Andrew from Dolton
Thanks, that will be very interesting. 'White Maman Cochet' was one I had my eye on to grow in a pot against the house and 'Dr Grill' too as it is so historically important. The winters are not such a problem but the short cool damp summers are difficult. Last year we had precipitation in one form or another almost every day from the end of July until October.
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Reply #7 of 12 posted 8 SEP by HubertG
From page 61, of the 1900 Rosen Zeitung. (not a direct translation):

These were killed off in a bad winter: Mme Eug. Verdier, Francis Dubreuil, Arch. Maria Immaculata, Perle des Jardins, Sunset, Franziska Kruger and Papa Gontier.

Suffering less were: Coquette de Lyon, Hon. Edith Gifford, Mlle Christine de Noue, Maman Cochet and Princesse de Sagan.

These faired well: Andre Schwartz, Baronne Henriette de Loew, Catherine Mermet, Comtesse de Frigneuse, Dr Grill, G. Nabonnand, Grace Darling, Mme Lombard, Princesse Alice de Monaco, Princesse de Bessarabe, Souvenir de Catherine Guillot, Luciole, The Queen, Frau Geheimrat von Boch, Principessa di Napoli, Prince Theodore Galitzine and The Sweet Little Queen.


I know a lot aren't available but thought I 'd mention them just in case you want to look into their pedigrees to find clues for other hardy teas.
I'd pick Mme Lombard, G. Nabonnand (or its sport Peace) for you and maybe Grace Darling and Souv, de Catherine Guillot if it's available there. I don't know that the British Dr Grill is correct. The Cochets do ball badly in rain which might be a problem - when they are good here they are very, very good, but when they are bad they are horrid. ;-)
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Reply #8 of 12 posted 13 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
This is not a direction I want my garden going in! Rather than spending a lot of extra effort trying to grow plants from warmer climates, concentrate on plants that grow well in my conditions, gallica roses for example. I did however just try to order 'White Maman Cochet' from Beales but they've sold out so I ordered 'Nuits de Young' from Trevor White instead. I am very interested though by 'Gilbert Nabonnand' and 'Dr Grill', so very tempting...

Did you ever get any plants to grow from your 'White Maman Cochet' seed?
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Reply #9 of 12 posted 13 days ago by HubertG
None of the 'White Maman Cochet' seeds have germinated yet, although I didn't plant all of them. In fact of all the different seeds I planted last winter only one has germinated so far.
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Reply #10 of 12 posted 9 days ago by HubertG
Andrew, I just came across this and thought I'd mention it here. There's an article in the 1914 Journal des roses, (Feb1, p22) that lists some Teas and HT's that survived the freezing winter of 1913 in France. The two Teas currently on lists that survived back then were Safrano and Mme. Jules Gravereaux.
Safrano is only semi-double (if that) and should open in damp conditions. It's a very elegant rose.
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Reply #11 of 12 posted 9 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
They are both well worth considering. Margaret's picture of 'Mme. Jules Gravereaux' looking good in "a cold wet spring" is particularly encouraging.
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Reply #12 of 12 posted 9 days ago by Margaret Furness
"Cold wet" is relative. Renmark gets frosts but no snow, and doesn't get much rain. Mme Jules has been slow-growing compared with most of the Tea-Noisettes (I have it listed as HT-Noisette).
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