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BenT_TX
most recent 6 OCT SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 18 JAN 12 by goncmg
Have grown this rose in central valley California and now 6a, Columbus. Every year I fall a little more out of love with it. It is quite unique, the petals are uniquely ruffled, the foliage is olive green and also basically ruffled, it is a bicolor/multicolor with a heavy scent. 48 years ago this was a hallmark. I had to create a "sick zone" this year in my yard (all in huge terracotta pots, sleep in the garage) mostly because of Granada and the fact it and it alone got disfiguring mildew, AGAIN, which I could not clear regardless of what I tried. Another one that back in the 70's was re-classified for years as a GR due to the fact it generally blooms in clusters if not pannicles. I'm just losing enthusiasm for this one and feel it over-rated and resting on its reputation that was gained years ago and before better bi-multi colors with scent appeared. If you have heard of it and wanted to try it likely it is worth the gamble if no more than so you can just say you tried what is basically a "legend." If Secret or Double Delight (its child) strike your fancy, by all means, walk on by..........its rating has fallen notably in the past decade or so, and although still in the "very good" range, I expect it to keep falling...........
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 29 APR 14 by Matt's North Texas Rose Garden
Agree about Double Delight, terrible... but Secret is quite nice and is AMAZING out at my Aunts place in the west Texas high plains.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 29 APR 14 by goncmg
Oh gosh, I think Secret is GREAT! I was suggesting Secret and even DD as an alternative to Granada which I find to be more and more problematic and when my ol' plant ages out, I will not replace it.
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 6 OCT by BenT_TX
In my opinion, while Secret and Double Delight are excellent and worthwhile varieties, they are very dissimilar to Granada, and not a suitable replacement. Granada is still quite a unique jewel-toned color combination, at different times you will find red, pink, orange, apricot , copper and yellow...a wonderful kaleidoscope of a bush. It produces a prodigious number of especially elegant buds on long straight single stems, beautiful for both garden display and Cut flowers. It has a very nice old rose fragrance. I understand it has propensity to mildew, but if you live in an area where that’s not a problem, or keep up the spray program, this is still a most uniquely fabulous and indispensable rose.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 6 OCT by Nastarana
I love 'Granada' also, for the changing colors and for the fragrance, but I think it needs a warm and fairly dry climate. I think of it as a late 20thC Pernetiana, in behavior if not in lineage.
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most recent 6 OCT HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 6 OCT by BenT_TX
An excellent garden rose, Barbra Streisand is a total blooming fool, covering itself with scores of blooms with fast repeat. It produces many basal breaks and blooms in huge panicles, I have nicknamed her ‘Barbra Candlelabra’. It blooms well in all weather, and is still generous during my hot and humid summers. The foliage is especially glossy and beautiful. It is not my favorite color...definitely on the pink side of mauve, it might be called orchid pink or even a dusty rose. The color is somewhere between First Prize and Angel Face, and just barely earns a mauve classification. Still , for its easy care, prodigious bloom and strong old rose fragrance, this rose well earns its place in the garden.
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most recent 6 OCT HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 6 OCT by BenT_TX
A uniquely high quality yellow hybrid tea. While most large yellow HTs open and drop their petals too quickly in hot weather, St Patrick is extraordinarily long lasting, and opens slowly and holds its most attractive high center form forever...a quality that cannot be over appreciated if you live in the South. It also shows its most unique characteristics...a chartreuse green edge, a pink center ...best when weather is warm. When cut inside, the color actually turns a deeper, almost golden yellow. Once in a while you’ll get a completely chartreuse green bloom. A rose with many interesting variations, all of them very attractive. The bloom also retains good size and petal count in heat. It grows with excellent vigor and disease resistance. In my opinion, easily the best yellow HT or grandiflora.
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most recent 30 SEP SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 3 SEP by BenT_TX
Easily the worst rose I have ever grown in 40 years, bar none. It quickly forms an unbelievable thorny thicket sprawling in all directions 5x5 feet within a few months...like a wild multiflora that has invaded the southeastern US , minus the spring flower flush. The few flowers it produced were miniature rose size, paper thin , fleeting, with a modest and mundane scent. I cannot imagine using it for bedding, cutflowers, landscaping or any other functions that a cultivated rose would traditionally perform. I do think it'd be unparalleled as an 'organic barbed wire', so perhaps it could be repurposed for theft deterrent, keeping out wild animals, prison plantings, frightening off undesirable children and adults alike, etc.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 5 SEP by Lavenderlace
Hi BenT,

Thanks for the vivid review, LOL! Sounds like this one would be out of control here. I was so curious about the fragrance but might take this one off the list!
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 5 SEP by BenT_TX
You're most welcome, Lavenderlace. It seems England's Favourite Rose (twice! according Austin marketing) is my Texas Chainsaw Massacre nightmare bush.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 5 SEP by Lavenderlace
Sounds like how New Dawn is for me!
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 30 SEP by GRH_England
Clearly Gertrude isn't suitable for that particular climate. I can assure you that in temperate climates as we have in England, it grows very well and has a beautiful scent.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 30 SEP by BenT_TX
My Gertrude Jekyll had a very unfortunate encounter with my newly sharpened spade. Otherwise, I'd happily return her back your way.
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