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billy teabag
most recent 9 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 27 JUN 14 by Michael Garhart
Definitely does not have pure Tea traits. It looks like a mixed Tea of sorts.
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Reply #1 of 10 posted 28 JUN 14 by Margaret Furness
Thank you. I've added more photos.
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 28 JUN 14 by Patricia Routley
Margaret - the details given for this rose were "low growing". That may be misleading as your photo shows a taller rose. What is the minimum and maximum height of this rose please.
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Reply #3 of 10 posted 29 JUN 14 by Margaret Furness
The plants I know are young, hence the erroneous conclusion. From Jane Zammit: "Mine is sort of a typical 2m x 2m x 2m – original at Rookwood had a wider spread & not much height – could have been any number of factors to cause that.
Would suggest it is probably closer to Drawing 3 in Vintage Gardens catalogue than Drawing 2, as it can be a little more open and ‘rangey’ than others."
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Reply #4 of 10 posted 29 JUN 14 by Patricia Routley
Thanks Margaret.
Has anyone considered 'Rhodologue Jules Gravereaux'? That is a medium height rose. What is the colour of the wood, both for "George Whatson" and "William James Wright"?
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Reply #5 of 10 posted 29 JUN 14 by Margaret Furness
Jane commented that the growth of "William James Wright" was similar to that of RJG and of Mrs B R Cant, but doesn't have the colour variability of many of the Teas. "George Whatson" has similarities to RJG and varies considerably in colour, but doesn't have the bicolour tones of RJG.
The wood of my plant of "George Whatson" is green, sometimes brown on one side. I will post more of Jane's photos of both tomorrow.
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Reply #7 of 10 posted 11 days ago by John Hook
I consider this rose to be 'Souv. d'un Ami' which I posted in 2013 on the 'Souv. d'un Ami' page. After growing for several years I have become more convinced. Please compare to the Hermann Baisch lithograph in Nestel's Rosengarten1866
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Reply #6 of 10 posted 11 days ago by Becky Hook
I consider this rose to be 'Souv. d'un Ami' which I posted in 2013 on the 'Souv. d'un Ami' page. After growing for several years I have become more convinced. Please compare to the Hermann Baisch lithograph in Nestel's Rosengarten1866
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Reply #8 of 10 posted 10 days ago by billy teabag
Becky and John - do you have "Bird Children Pink" in your collection?
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Reply #9 of 10 posted 9 days ago by Margaret Furness
To summarise: The rose sold in Aus as Souv. d'un Ami came from NZ and is incorrect, so we don't have a gold standard for comparison with the various candidates on offer.
One is "George Whatson", collected Rookwood, following your suggestion.
Another is "Bird Children Pink", a stable pink sport or reversion of a white Rookwood Tea, "Bird Children". A white sport of Souv d'un Ami, known as both The Queen and Souv de S A Prince, reached Australia.
A third is "Almerta Orchard Pink", which is thought to be the same as the "McClinton Tea", which Vintage Roses suggested might be Souv d'un Ami.
I'm no expert, and shouldn't speculate on which of these - if any - is correct. Early illustrations can mislead, and it's difficult when it's uncertain whether anyone has the true rose to compare foundlings with.
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Reply #10 of 10 posted 9 days ago by Becky Hook
No, Billy we don't have that, just the G. W. Rookwood.
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most recent 9 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 days ago by billy teabag
I have a rose that arrived with the name 'Radiance' that's definitely not 'Radiance'. Trying to discover its correct identity, I've noticed a change in the description of 'Radiance' over time.
The early descriptions tell us that the backs of the petals are darker than the petal faces and this can be confirmed in the earliest photographs.
However, by 1958, Modern Roses V has this reversed: ("rose-pink, reverse lighter"), and this description has carried forward to at least Modern Roses 10. I don't have a copy of the most recent Modern Roses and haven't been able to check whether this has been amended.
Wondering how widespread the confusion is and how many are growing or selling 'Radiance' impostors.
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Reply #1 of 11 posted 11 days ago by Margaret Furness
The photos on hmf look like they have the darker pink outside (apart from one that I'm not sure is correct). The one in the HRIAI Collection is from an old plant of David Ruston's, budded by John N, who presumably also supplied the plant at Maddingley.
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Reply #2 of 11 posted 11 days ago by Patricia Routley
It hasn't been amended. Still ("rose-pink, reverse lighter")
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Reply #4 of 11 posted 10 days ago by billy teabag
Thanks Patricia
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Reply #3 of 11 posted 10 days ago by billy teabag
Thanks Margaret.
Do you know the provenance of Red Radiance at the respository?

My rose is flattish-globular warm deep pink with lighter petal reverses and about double the usual Radiance petal number.
The budwood was said to be from Rustons some years ago - not the respository.
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Reply #5 of 11 posted 10 days ago by Margaret Furness
Yep - Red Radiance came from 'Kombacy' via Thomas for Roses.
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Reply #6 of 11 posted 10 days ago by billy teabag
Thanks Margaret. A long shot - Would you happen to know whether the Red Radiance budwood for the Stirling Square project would have come from the repository plant or another 'Red Radiance' from the Ruston collection?
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Reply #7 of 11 posted 10 days ago by Margaret Furness
I have the Kombacy Red Radiance here - do you want photos of it?
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Reply #8 of 11 posted 10 days ago by billy teabag
Always good to see more photos, but this will be the same as the one in the repository and that doesn't look like our ring in.
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Reply #9 of 11 posted 10 days ago by Margaret Furness
I think on my plant the outside of the Red Radiance petals is minimally darker than the inside, but is quickly bleached by hot sunshine.
A while back I posted a photo of the unstable Careless Love in the channel row at Renmark, but I don't think it helps much.
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Reply #10 of 11 posted 10 days ago by Margaret Furness
Pat tells me that David's plant list doesn't include Red Radiance (which must be why Thomases asked me for budwood from Kombacy when they lost their stock plant). Can't tell you where the budwood sent to WA came from.
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Reply #11 of 11 posted 9 days ago by Ozoldroser
Weren't there a few Radiances at a property near Hay at that conference?
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most recent 9 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 10 days ago by billy teabag
Could someone who knows 'Columbia' very well give me some guidance on how to recognise this rose.
The descriptions suggest a bright pink rose with blooms that darken in colour as they age, but none of the photos here show a particularly strong coloured bloom. Do any of the photos show a good likeness of the colour?
There are references to 'almost thornless stems'. Is the whole plant almost thornless, or just the flowering stems?
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 9 days ago by Patricia Routley
If it helps, there used to be a 'Columbia' at the Pinjarra Heritage Rose Garden, bed 8, site 19.
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most recent 10 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 13 days ago by billy teabag
Could I ask those who grow 'President Herbert Hoover' to check the stamen colour and leaf shape please?

Are the filaments yellow, reddish, or can they graduate from red to yellow?

Are the leaflets elongated or roundish and how prominent are the serrations and veins?
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 12 days ago by Patricia Routley
Maybe tomorrow. I have added a bud and leaf photo in the meantime.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 11 days ago by billy teabag
Thanks Patricia.
Perth Region of HRIA visited a farm garden near Brookton on the weekend and there were some old HTs / Pernetianas in the garden of the original farm house that was built in the 1920s.
'Picture' was one of the roses and possibly 'McGredy's Yellow'. The others had young buds (shades of orange) and spent blooms (faded cream or buff/ apricot with carmine veining) so we could only guess at what the partly open and fresh blooms looked like.
I wondered whether one of them might be 'President Herbert Hoover' but will need to do more work.
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 10 days ago by Patricia Routley
This morning's open bloom shows a graduation from red to yellow.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 10 days ago by billy teabag
Thank you!
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