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billy teabag
most recent 1 SEP HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 31 AUG by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Best reference for any rose !! Great picture.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 1 SEP by billy teabag
agree!
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most recent 31 AUG HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 31 AUG by billy teabag
Some additional references from Australian nursery catalogues and Australian Rose Annuals.

1929 Hazlewood Bros.
p70. No 192 of 200 based on previous year’s sales.
Dorina Neave (H.T.) ( Pemberton, 1926), 3. Silvery pink, large, fairly full pointed globular flowers carried erect on stiff stems. The growth is good, but foliage shows slight mildew. The blooms average 30 petals and are Tea scented. Recommended . E.

1930 Hazlewood Bros.
p66. No 174 of 200 based on previous year’s sales.
Dorina Neave (H.T.) ( Pemberton, 1926), 3. Silvery pink, large, fairly full pointed globular flowers carried erect on stiff stems. The growth is good, but foliage shows slight mildew. The blooms average 30 petals and are Tea scented. Recommended . E.

1932 Hazlewood Bros.
P73 Does not appear in list of 200 best sellers but is included in a supplementary list of available roses – name only – no description or comments.

This is the last mention I have found to it in Hazlewood cats.

Entries in other Australian catalogues:

Law Somner, Melbourne, 1928
P130 Dorina Neave The colour is a delightful silvery pink. The large, full, pointed, globular flowers are carried erect on stiff stems. Fragrant. 2/6

Dawson and Harrison, Perth, 1932
P9. Dorina Neave The colour is a delightful silvery pink. The large, full-pointed flowers are carried erect on stiff stems. It is Tea scented and the blooms have about 30 petals.

George Knight and Sons, Homebush, NSW, 1938
P27 Dorina Neave (H.T.) - A strong grower, free bloomer, on good long strong stems; first class garden or exhibition; colour, pale flesh pink.

TG Stewart, Box Hill Victoria 1941
P4 Dorina Neave (H.T.) Delicate silvery pink. The large, full pointed blooms are carried erect on stiff stems. Compact growth. Free flowering and fragrantly scented.


References in the Australian Rose Annual
1928 p 39 In his assessment of recently introduced decorative roses Sydney nurseryman Harry Hazlewood writes, “ There are several others of somewhat lesser value, though still good. Briarcliff, a pink Columbia sport; Dorina Neave, silvery pink; Golden Gleam, somewhat like Golden Emblem but smaller and with less petals; Mrs Lovell Swisher, lilac rose, with good shape and growth.”

1929 p153 – “Dorina Neave – A moderate grower only with me, but has many good points. Colour silvery pink; stems strong and erect; flowers freely, and have used them for exhibition purposes at times.” (Mr J.W. Firth, Thornbury, Victoria.)

1930 p 86 – Dorina Neave - listed among favourite paler pink roses for decoration. (Edith V. Oliver. Essenden, Victoria.)

1931 p81 – “Dorina Neave is a dual purpose rose for garden or exhibition, of a beautiful silvery pink of excellent shape and good growth.” (Alick Ross, Ashton, South Australia.)
1931 p109 – “Dorina Neave – Light silvery pink, darker on back of petals; large size; fine form.” (Ballarat Rose Test Garden – JW Clegg, Ballarat, Victoria)

1933 p93 Dorina Neave - Listed among roses in which “The Pernetiana strain is not very apparent, but there is undoubted evidence that Pernetiana blood is represented.” (Harry Hazlewood, Epping, NSW)

1938 p148 – Dorina Neave - Included in 24 Garden Roses recommended by the National Rose Society of Western Australia.

1939 p153 – Dorina Neave - Included in 24 Garden Roses recommended by the National Rose Society of Western Australia.
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most recent 29 JUL SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 20 JUL by Give me caffeine
Billy, how did you get the rotten mongrel to look that good? Mine is flatly refusing to behave, under conditions in which several other Teas are absolutely romping.
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Reply #1 of 7 posted 24 JUL by billy teabag
Treat 'em mean? A number of the best crops of blooms, including these, I suspect, have been found after the plant has been rescued from the weeds.

Like VB Rossi's comments about Maman Cochet - "In dealing with Tea roses, the grower will notice the vast difference that exists between some varieties. Take, for example, white and pink Maman Cochet; they abhor being pruned. The best blooms I have ever seen were on unpruned plants running riot. The only time they require the knife is in cutting the blooms. They should be grown by themselves, given a good position, and attention to watering and manuring is all they require to produce large quantities of good blooms,"

It's not always lovely here GMC - the outer petals bruise easily, but I do think it improves with age.
Climate certainly comes into play and I guess time will tell whether 'Hugo Roller' prefers a dryer climate than yours, or whether it is capricious.

What is your 'Hugo Roller' like in the prickle department?
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Reply #2 of 7 posted 24 JUL by Give me caffeine
Mine doesn't seem to have any prickles. Don't know how long that will last, but it's smooth as silk at the moment.

I've pretty much decided that I'm going to move it to a spot where it can just go ahead and be ugly. That way if it ever produces any blooms worth looking at it will be a pleasant surprise, and if it doesn't it won't be a waste of space in a prime spot.

Edit: Just had a thought. In my climate it's possible that this one would be best suited as a cutting rose that is cut before the buds open. Which is fine if it's growing in an out of the way spot.
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 25 JUL by billy teabag
'Etoile de Lyon' is another with outer petals and petal tips that bruise easily but which, when cut as buds and allowed to open inside, not only open delightfully but with a much more intense yellow colour than blooms seen on the plant growing out in the elements.
Like 'Hugo Roller', it has good, strong, disease resistant foliage, and the petals have some real substance too.
Reasons for why the blooms of certain roses bruise and ball, and why they do it in some conditions and not in others deserve closer scrutiny I reckon. Soggy weather certainly contributes but it isn't just that a rose has blooms that are especially full or have especially tissuey petals.
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Reply #4 of 7 posted 25 JUL by Give me caffeine
Thanks for the tip re Etoile de Lyon. I'll bear that in kind if I ever decide to get one.

This balling thing is weird. In my garden Aotearoa seems almost immune to weather, but it's notorious for being subject to balling in other places. And it's definitely not a case of us not getting rain and humidity here. Nor have I given the thing any special care.

Mrs Dudley Cross on the other hand is a great producer of soggy lumps at the slightest excuse. Although this may be down to the plant being so young. Some member comments indicate that Mrs Grumpy* takes a few years to get into her stride.

*(my nickname for her, because she's cross)

Edit: Take a look at http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=21.304470 if you want to see what the canes are like on mine.
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Reply #5 of 7 posted 28 JUL by billy teabag
It looks very healthy GMC - and beautifully smooth. Mine rarely has prickles but I've seen plants that are partially prickled - a bit like your Restless example. (Have those prickles persisted, or have they dropped off as the wood ages?)
Probably repeating myself here - we were shown a really old plant of Hugo Roller that had been neglected for many years and then enthusiastically chopped back on one side. The parts of that plant that had been untouched or only lightly trimmed were completely thornless, while the side of the bush that had had a hard chop was producing impressively prickly new canes. I haven't sen it since and don't know whether the prickles persisted.
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Reply #6 of 7 posted 29 JUL by Give me caffeine
I don't know if you remember, but my Restless was a victim of "stunt gardening", aka "flying lessons in a howling gale", so that plant no longer exists. The cutting I took from its dying remnants is completely thornless so far, even though obviously all the canes on it are young. There's a shot of it here: http://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/l.php?l=21.304306

Nothing much to look at right now, but it's healthy and should do well when planted out.
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Reply #7 of 7 posted 29 JUL by billy teabag
Lovely and healthy. Your garden and its setting looks beautiful.
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most recent 25 JUL HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 24 JUL by CybeRose
Gardening Illustrated 17: 573 (Jan 7, 1905)
TEA ROSE SULPHUREA.
This lovely Rose will take as prominent a place among garden Roses as G. Nabonnand, Corallina, and Lady Battersea. As its name implies, the colour is a pale sulphur-yellow, a very pure tint. The blossoms, which are produced in large, spreading corymbs, are borne erect, so that very flower is well displayed. I have seen in one truss as many as five glorious blossoms (xpanded atone time, which will explain the suitability of the variety for decoration. The main effect in a large group is white, the sulphur tint being only conspicuous on close inspection. There is a solidity about the petals which gives it great staying powers on a hot day. A most charming effect is produced by the almost purple foliage. In no Rose of my acqmaintance is this so conspicuous, even the foliage alone would give the variety much value as an ornamental shrub. As the sprays of blossom are spreading in their habit, so also are the plants. I do not mean in the same way as Princesse de Sagan. This Rose produces its growths almot horizontally, which is a defect, but in Sulphurea plenty of space is allowed between each branch, so that an elegant plant is the result. I have forced Sulphurea with excellent results, and find it far superior to the old favourite Isabella Sprunt. Market growers who have a demand for bud Roses would find this very useful, as the buds are not so large as those of Mme. Hoste.
Sulphurea was raised by Messrs. Wm. Paul and Son, of Waltham Cross, and received an award of merit from the R.H.S. in 1902. - ROSA
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 25 JUL by billy teabag
Thank you - that's a very useful addition to the description of this rose.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 25 JUL by CybeRose
I like the idea of a yellow rose with purple foliage.
Karl
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