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La Rose de France
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 299.  
 
At the end of the 18th century a variety called "Agaat Roos" existed in Holland : one finds it in the Catalogue des principaux arbres, arbrisseaux, arbustes...published by the nurseryman François, in Paris in 1790. It is probably extinct, unless it has changed its name, as with many Dutch varieties imported into France.
...Currently two nurseries...offer a "Agathe rose" in sale. ...However, the crimson bloom does not correspond to the description... Besides no public collection possesses this variety.
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 299.  
 
AGATHE ROYALE. This variety is from before 1811, the date when Guerrepain cites it in his Almanach. It is thus called by Vibert, while Godefroy and others name it "Bouquet parfait". It came from Holland. It was a "small, double, regular, light red or cherry, agated red" (Prévost, 1829).
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 305.  
 
Agrippine Gallica. Miellez. Included in the collection of the Luxembourg Garden around 1852-1860.
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 305.  
 
Aigle Brun Synonyms: 'Maheka à fleurs simples' (Redouté); 'L'Arragroise pourpre velouté' (Bozérian). Included in the collection of the Luxembourg Garden around 1852-1860.
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 305.  
 
Aigle Noir (Descemet). Included in the collection of the Luxembourg Garden around 1852-1860.
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 305.  
 
Aimable de Stors ('Ninon de Lenclos', 'Joséphine', 'Faustine') Included in the collection of the Luxembourg Garden around 1852-1860.
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 306.  
 
Aimable Jardinière Gallica. Miellez. Included in the collection of the Luxembourg Garden around 1852-1860.
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 132-133.  
 
Aimable Rouge Vibert, 1819-1820.
Synonyms:
Boule d'hortensia (according to Pirolle, 1826). Le triomphe (idem). Triomphe biflore (idem).
Habit: 1.20 m, upright, some prickles. Foliage: light, small leaflets, rounded or elliptical, normally 5 per leaf, bu very often only 3. Bloom: solitary, medium size, cupped, well double, quartered. Colour: shaded red. Fragrance: medium.
References: Vibert, catal. 1820, no. 404 and following catalogues. Bibliography: Jacob et al. p. 96. Trade: Yes, but rare. Collections: author, Sangerhausen.

A first 'Aimable rouge' existed, which, according to Redouté, came from Holland. One finds this in the Almanach of Guerrapain (1811) who states there "a pink less dark than that of Centifolias, blended with White", and in the Nomenclature of Pronville (1818) who describes it as "a beautiful hydrangea-pink, fading to white towards the edges of the petals". It is perhaps this variety which Desportes, in his Rosetum gallicum (1828) names 'Aimable pourpre', effectively indicating that it comes from Holland. It was painted by Salomon Pinhas, at Wilhelmshöhe (Kassel, Germany), towards 1815: this painting is still found today in the collections of the castle. This first variety is probably extinct, contrary to what is indicated in the bibliography.
More probably, the current 'Aimable rouge' is the gallica obtained by Vibert in 1819, to which he gave the same name as the old variety. Apparently he strongly hesitated in ist classification, as he placed it among "Provins* in his catalogue of 1820, then in "Hybrid Centifolia" in that of 1822, and finally in "Hybrid Provence" in that of 1824 (but is that the same, as it is now dated 1820 and not 1819?)
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 132-133.  
 
Aimable Rouge Vibert, 1819-1820.
Synonyms:
Boule d'hortensia (according to Pirolle, 1826). Le triomphe (idem). Triomphe biflore (idem).
Habit: 1.20 m, upright, some prickles. Foliage: light, small leaflets, rounded or elliptical, normally 5 per leaf, bu very often only 3. Bloom: solitary, medium size, cupped, well double, quartered. Colour: shaded red. Fragrance: medium.
References: Vibert, catal. 1820, no. 404 and following catalogues. Bibliography: Jacob et al. p. 96. Trade: Yes, but rare. Collections: author, Sangerhausen.

A first 'Aimable rouge' existed, which, according to Redouté, came from Holland. One finds this in the Almanach of Guerrapain (1811) who states there "a pink less dark than that of Centifolias, blended with White", and in the Nomenclature of Pronville (1818) who describes it as "a beautiful hydrangea-pink, fading to white towards the edges of the petals". It is perhaps this variety which Desportes, in his Rosetum gallicum (1828) names 'Aimable pourpre', effectively indicating that it comes from Holland. It was painted by Salomon Pinhas, at Wilhelmshöhe (Kassel, Germany), towards 1815: this painting is still found today in the collections of the castle. This first variety is probably extinct, contrary to what is indicated in the bibliography.
More probably, the current 'Aimable rouge' is the gallica obtained by Vibert in 1819, to which he gave the same name as the old variety. Apparently he strongly hesitated in ist classification, as he placed it among "Provins* in his catalogue of 1820, then in "Hybrid Centifolia" in that of 1822, and finally in "Hybrid Provence" in that of 1824 (but is that the same, as it is now dated 1820 and not 1819?)
(Jul 1998)  Page(s) 122-123.  
 
Aimable Rouge Vibert, 1819-1820.
Synonyms:
Boule d'hortensia (according to Pirolle, 1826). Le triomphe (idem). Triomphe biflore (idem).
Habit: 1.20 m, upright, some prickles. Foliage: light, small leaflets, rounded or elliptical, normally 5 per leaf, bu very often only 3. Bloom: solitary, medium size, cupped, well double, quartered. Colour: shaded red. Fragrance: medium.
References: Vibert, catal. 1820, no. 404 and following catalogues. Bibliography: Jacob et al. p. 96. Trade: Yes, but rare. Collections: author, Sangerhausen.

A first 'Aimable rouge' existed, which, according to Redouté, came from Holland. One finds this in the Almanach of Guerrapain (1811) who states there "a pink less dark than that of Centifolias, blended with white", and in the Nomenclature of Pronville (1818) who describes it as "a beautiful hydrangea-pink, fading to white towards the edges of the petals". It is perhaps this variety which Desportes, in his Rosetum gallicum (1828) names 'Aimable pourpre', effectively indicating that it comes from Holland. It was painted by Salomon Pinhas, at Wilhelmshöhe (Kassel, Germany), towards 1815: this painting is still found today in the collections of the castle. This first variety is probably extinct, contrary to what is indicated in the bibliography.
More probably, the current 'Aimable rouge' is the gallica obtained by Vibert in 1819, to which he gave the same name as the old variety. Apparently he strongly hesitated in ist classification, as he placed it among "Provins* in his catalogue of 1820, then in "Hybrid Centifolia" in that of 1822, and finally in "Hybrid Provence" in that of 1824 (but is that the same, as it is now dated 1820 and not 1819?)
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