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Asia's Part in Rose History
 
(1950)  Page(s) 111.  
 
R. centifolia probably originated in the Caucasus and was first cultivated in Persia. It is said to have reached Britain in 1596 and has been used in hybridizing for petalage and fragrance.
 
(1950)  Page(s) 114.  
 
R. microphylla or Roxburghii... accredited to the Japanese area [single, light pink]
 
(1950)  Page(s) 114.  
 
R. cathayensis is considered to be the ancestor of the 'Crimson Rambler'
(1950)  Page(s) 113.  
 
R. hugonis named for the Reverend Hugh Scallon and discovered in the Min Valley of Western China in 1899 by E.H. Wilson, the great plant hunter.
 
(1950)  Page(s) 112.  
 
Persian Yellow was known in England before 1607. [ed. note: is this a confusion of Rosa lutea multiplex, for example mentioned in The Gardeners Dictionary, by Phillip Miller (1735) or Hortus Kewensis (1789) which mentions its introduction in 1629. ]
(1950)  Page(s) 113.  
 
Sir Joseph Banks, a collector of note who also built up the famous Kew Gardens in England, is credited with the introduction of the Chinese rose, Rosa Banksiae, into England in 1807... [it] bears clusters of small white or yellow flowers, very sweet scented...
(1950)  Page(s) 113.  
 
Lord McCartney introduced Rosa bracteata into England in 1765. Its range of habitat is northwestern China and southeastern Tibet.
 
(1950)  Page(s) 111.  
 
R. coriifolia, the Leatherleaf Rose
(1950)  Page(s) 114.  
 
R. cathayensis is considered to be the ancestor of the 'Crimson Rambler'
(1950)  Page(s) 111.  
 
R. cinnamonea was native in Eastern Europe and in Western Asia
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