HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
DescriptionPhotosLineageAwardsReferencesMember RatingsMember CommentsMember JournalsCuttingsGardensBuy From 
'Emily Gray' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 78-227
most recent 12 MAY 14 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 12 MAY 14 by CybeRose
Gardening Illustrated - Volume 40 - Page 255 (1918)

The new yellow climbing Wichuraiana Emily Gray was in good condition, and attracted alike by reason of colour and large, shining leafage.
REPLY
Discussion id : 78-226
most recent 12 MAY 14 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 12 MAY 14 by CybeRose
The Garden, vol. 82, p. 204 (May 18, 1918)

Conspicuous items in the display were the fine stands of the new climbing yellow-flowered Wichuraiana Emily Gray, whose rich-coloured bloom and fine lustrous foliage are almost sure to make it popular;
REPLY
Discussion id : 78-225
most recent 12 MAY 14 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 12 MAY 14 by CybeRose
American Rose Annual, p. 103 (1919)

Wichuraiana
Emily Gray. (B. R. Cant & Sons.) A fine yellow climbing rose, with foliage like Berberis vulgaris, very glossy and of great substance. The blooms are almost as large as those of Mme. Ravary. Awarded Gold Medal of N. R. S.
REPLY
Discussion id : 78-224
most recent 12 MAY 14 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 12 MAY 14 by CybeRose
The Garden Magazine, Volume 31, p. 166 (May 1920)

Climbing Rose Emily Gray. A climbing yellow Rose with large flowers and high fragrance has long been a dream, and visitors to the recent International Flower Show at New York were considerably intrigued with the exhibit of this variety, a European novelty introduced here by A. N. Pierson. It has been thought sufficiently well of abroad to have been awarded the Gold Medal of the National Rose Society. The foliage is decidedly glossy, of good stout texture, and the individual blooms recall the yellow of Marechal Niel, and to some extent its fragrance also. The originator states that the blooms are "almost as large as those of Mme. Ravary," and likens the foliage to that of Berberis vulgaris. The appearance of the plant as seen here would suggest the influence of Fortune's Yellow Rose as one of the parents, and it is stated that the other is wichuraiana. It is to be hoped that the latter parent may have injected a sufficient degree of hardiness to make Emily Gray a really valuable Rose for American gardens, but first appearances raise a doubt. However, this year's experience should definitely determine the point. But whether or not it will become available as a garden Rose of the North, there can be no question of its intrinsic beauty and merit and for the southern tier of states Emily Gray is bound to be a valuable acquisition.
REPLY
© 2017 HelpMeFind.com