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'Gruss an Teplitz' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 49-818
most recent 17 NOV 10 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 17 NOV 10 by Margit Schowalter
"GRUSS AN TEPLITZ - Hardiest Hybrid Tea Rose, continuous bloomer, dark red double. Plant deep, 1 foot, and you will have it for years. Each $1.50. Best of all in my opinion for the district."

Boughen Nurseries Catalogue, Valley River, Manitoba, Canada 1950

[note: Valley River is in Canadian Zone 2]
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Discussion id : 13-708
most recent 20 AUG 06 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 15 AUG 06 by Bill Raimond
In my Zone 6B Rose Garden 'Gruss an Teplitz' seems to be a magnet for blackspot and will defoliate if it is not sprayed weekly.  The plant is fairly new to my garden (1 1/2 years old).  It was received and planted as a rooted cutting 1 1/2 years ago.  The first year it was very healthy this year, it's struggling.  The problem could be heat stress related, it's been very hot, 100+ degrees per day.  I do plan on keeping this rose and (except for the blackspot) can understand why it has remained so popular for over last 100 years, it's blooming season is very long  and the fragrance is great too.
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Reply #1 of 17 posted 15 AUG 06 by Meschuee
Hello.Is the rose in a tub?  You could move it to a shadier place if it was.  I spray against blackspot for all my roses but not as often as you have to.Penny :)
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Reply #2 of 17 posted 15 AUG 06 by Unregistered Guest
Hi Penny,Thank you for the suggestion.  Yes, all my roses, with the exception of Mini Roses are in 20 gallon black nursery pots.  The pots are buried in the soil, 2 inch holes cut into the bottom of the pot to facilitate drainage and root growth.  The rose is getting about 6 hours of shade.  The  shade is present during the hottest part of the day.  The Temp. right now (4:40 PM) is 97 F with a Heat Index of 102 F.  The rose gets 1 to 2 cold showers during the hottest part of the day and are dry by night fall. Bill
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Reply #3 of 17 posted 16 AUG 06 by Meschuee
Hello Bill.That's interesting, that you sink your pots in the ground - does that keep them cool, too?  I know bonsai keepers who do the same thing.  Can only hope your weather cools soon.  It is cooler here but still no rain.I brought home a new climber today, "Perpetually  Yours".  Do you know that rose? It's very pretty.  I want to get another flower arch on which to grow it.  It can wait in its pot until I do.  Penny :)
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Reply #4 of 17 posted 16 AUG 06 by Unregistered Guest
Hi Penny.  The planted pots do help in keeping the roots of the rose in a cool zone, but the real reason we grow our roses in buried 20 gallon nursery pots is to protect them from "Pocket Gophers".  We live on what is called Gopher Hill.  Pocket  Gophers can pass through a 2 inch hole-- so our side drain  holes  are  1/2 to 3/4 inches in dia.  The drain holes in the bottom of the pot are 2  inchs in dia.  The 2 inch drain holes also allow the roots to expand.  The bottom drain holes are well below the gopher runs.  You also need at least 3 inches of the pot above ground level so that the gophers cannot climb into the pot.  The pots have many other benefits, beside gopher protection, i.e., feeding and watering and if needed, as you suggested,  moving the rose to another location with little or no damage  to  the roots.  I'm not real familiar with 'Perpetually Yours'.  I understand it has lemon-white blooms and a nice spicy fragrance.  Bill Raimond
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Reply #11 of 17 posted 18 AUG 06 by Meschuee
Hello Bill.Ah, I see.  Luckily, we don't have those creatures over here!  Thanks for the explanation.        Yes, "Perpetually Yours" looks white on my photos but is the palest of lemon-yellows inside.  It does have a very nice scent but not an overpowering one.  I've got a self-assembly arch and hope to plant the rose over the weekend, or next week.:)
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Reply #12 of 17 posted 18 AUG 06 by Bill Raimond
Hi Penny,I don't grow 'Perpetually Yours' but some friends of ours do; their plant has been, I think, in the ground for a little over 2 years.  The growth habit seems to be very similar to our 'Sombreul'  which I do grow--- If you like LCl's,  you might want to give 'White Cap' a try, it's never been without flowers in my garden-- it bears very double white flowers with a very nice, light scent.  'White Cap' is out 'New Dawn'  which is another good reason to grow it.  It's very hardy  and a very  rare Brownell bred rose.  Have a great day!Bill Raimond 
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Reply #15 of 17 posted 19 AUG 06 by Meschuee
Thanks a lot, Bill.  I'll definitely take a look at "White Cap".  Good to be around people who can recommend roses through experience of them, or their friends' experience.           I've always understood that, over here, we get blackspot because of  the damp climate.  We're advised, when we have to water, not to wet the leaves of a rose, but to water into the ground at the roots.  Funnily, though, it's been a hot summer and yet we've had a lot of blackspot.  Perhaps the spores grow in the damp and weaken the plant so that it can't cope with the heat.           It's rained!  At last.  We really need it but it's knocked back the flowers of some of the roses.:)
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Reply #16 of 17 posted 19 AUG 06 by Bill Raimond
Hi once again,I really don't think I would be afraid to get my leaves wet; I top water/spray my roses twice a day with no ill affects.  The problems occur when we water.  BS spores can be spread by splashing water and by the gardener when cultivating the rose bed.  The BS spores may also be carried in water droplets by the wind.  Spores  can be passed along on clothing, gardening tools and yes, even your hands.  But I would say that the spreading of BS most likely to occur when the gardener waters the roses and allows the water to splash up onto the foliage from the mulch and fallen leaves, all of which may be infected or contain BS spores.  I guess I talk to much, when I start I can't stop, especially when the topic is roses.  Have a good day.   Bill Raimond
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Reply #17 of 17 posted 20 AUG 06 by Meschuee
Hello Bill.I appreciate your views - certainly not too much talk!  I hadn't stopped to think of the mechanics of the spread of spores.  I'm sure you're correct.    :)Hope your day is a good one, too.Penny
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Reply #5 of 17 posted 17 AUG 06 by Lyn G

Bill,


It's highly unlikely that the blackspot problem is caused by heat stress given the temperatures you are reporting.  BS spores do not live if the temps are above 85 degrees.  If the rose is going to be bs prone, it would happen in the spring or fall bloom season... not during the high temps of summer.


 


Smiles,


Lyn, helpmefind.com

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Reply #6 of 17 posted 17 AUG 06 by Bill Raimond
Thank you Lyn.  In Okla. we always seem to have a BS problem in the summer starting in May/June and carrying over throughout the summer and in the spring and fall we are fighting Powdery Mildew (BM).  Please keep in mind that in our climate, the temp range can be from 104 F during the day, dropping to 72 F during late night and early morning hours.  I feel that my roses are showing the symptoms of BS, that is to say, green leaves with black spots that eventually turn the leaves yellow.  I've been told that A single BS spore can form a visible colony from a single spore on a moist leaf at 70 to 80 degrees F.  and at temps above 80 degrees may become dormant.  My new and immature canes and basal shoots are also starting to show purplish red blotches.  Lyn, normally in early spring I spray Copper Sulphate Pentahydrate (21.36%) at the rate of 2 tsp per/gal.  I also use the same chemical as a soil drench at the rate of 3 tsp per/gal.  We will normally follow up with Mancozeb or Protect mixed with Banner Maxx and by early summer I'm spraying Compost Tea and Kelp.  However due illness I was unable to prepare my roses for winter or take care of my spring and early summer chores/spraying.Lyn if you still think it's not BS, I'm very open to suggestions.  Bill Raimond  
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Reply #7 of 17 posted 17 AUG 06 by Lyn G

Bill,


To be honest, I have never had to spray my garden for black spot because until I moved to the mountains, bs was a non-issue for me as I lived in southern California.  We, too, have a 30 to 50 degree change in temps during a 24 hour period, but my guess is that we do not have the same kind of climate as far as humidity and other factors are concerned.  This year, once the day temps reached the triple digits, I had no disease in my garden.  I am certain there must factors at play that I cannot identify.


I have enjoyed reading your garden journal and I recognize  you are an experienced rosarian and know how to identify what you are seeing on your plants.  So if you say you have black spot, I believe you!  I still wonder if "heat stress" is what is making your plants vulnerable to disease.  In a way, it does make sense because from what I have read in your journal and your other posts, your roses are not experiencing any other kinds of stress.


Smiles,


Lyn, helpmefind.com

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Reply #13 of 17 posted 19 AUG 06 by christie

hi.


does bs actually die at the higher temperature or just go dormant?


thanks in advance, christie

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Reply #14 of 17 posted 19 AUG 06 by Bill Raimond
Good Morning Christie, I don't know what you mean by high; lets just say temps over 90 degrees F.  I can't say with any certainty that BS go's dormant or dies at high temps, but, I can say with certainty that climates with high humidity and high temps are excellent breeding grounds for BS (Diplocarpon Rosae) and roses that grow in those high humidity and high temp areas suffer greatly from BS.  MY opinion is that if the conditions are right BS thrives, if conditions are not conducive to BS, it go's dormant.  The sure way to rid your roses of BS is to prune away and destroy affected stems/branches.  In lieu of pruning away all infected stems and branches, A good spray program should be adopted.   It is also important to reduce the number of leaves during the winter by simply striping them away and remove any young growth that could have BS lesions  as well as keeping the rose bed clean.    Regarding dormancy issue, I'm contacting a friend at OSU who should be able to answer the question-- as soon as he responds I'll pass the information on to you.   Have a good  day.  Bill Raimond
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Reply #8 of 17 posted 17 AUG 06 by Jody
Hi Bill, I hope you don't mind if I ask why do you bury the pots? is it to help with the heat? or some other reason? Thanks  Jody 
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Reply #9 of 17 posted 17 AUG 06 by Bill Raimond
Hi Jody, I don't mind you asking why I bury my nursery pots?  While it's true, it does help in keeping my roses cool, it is not the primary reason their in pots.  We have a Pocket Gopher infestation.  These gophers all seem to have a taste for rose roots, which they attack within hours of planting.  They (Pocket Gophers) never allow a  rose to fully  mature below the soil level.  I use 20 gallon pots (I have some 30 gallon pots) so that I can get the rose roots below the gopher runs (tunnels).  The lower drain holes are 2 inches in dia. the upper drain holes are 1/2 to 3/4 inches in dia.  The gophers can not squeeze through the 1/2 to 3/4 inch holes.  You do however, need to ensure that you have at least 3 inches of the pot above the ground our the gopher will crawl into the pot with your rose bush.  I wish I could take credit the Pocket Gopher idea but the real credit belongs to Gregg Lowery, Vintage Gardens, in CA who had a similar problem.   Jody, have a great day- Bill
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Reply #10 of 17 posted 17 AUG 06 by Jody
Thanks Bill, what a clever idea. I have a mole problem but never thought of this idea of burying the pots. But I see now why you do it.  A couple of my roses have not done well and it was suggested to me that the moles like to nest in the roots, not necessarily eat them but disturb them by nesting. I may try this idea. Thanks again for answering my question.  Best wishes  Jody
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