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'Long John Silver' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 108-933
most recent 1 MAR HIDE POSTS
Initial post 1 MAR by CybeRose
The American Rose Magazine 5(6): 119-120 (Nov-Dec 1943)
The Recent Horvath Climbers
R. E. Shepherd, Medina, Ohio
Long John Silver, another valuable Climber, is the result of a similar cross, but in this case Mr. Horvath used the Hybrid Tea, Sunburst, rather than WilIowmere as the pollen parent. In this instance, though, the blossoms of the hybrid do not resemble those of the pollen parent in color, as they are silvery white and are borne in clusters. This rose has not proved to be as vigorous or hardy as Jean Lafitte.
Discussion id : 94-398
most recent 13 AUG 16 HIDE POSTS
Initial post 13 AUG 16 by Sambolingo
Available from - Rogue Valley Roses
Discussion id : 86-293
most recent 30 JUN 15 HIDE POSTS
Initial post 30 JUN 15 by Hovman
I have both Baltimore belle and Long John Silver planted , Baltimore Belle is more generous in its bloom quantity and blooms earlier , Long John Silver blooms later than most roses , its blooms are flatter, it also takes a bit longer to establish.
Discussion id : 13-448
most recent 17 AUG 14 SHOW ALL
Initial post 25 JUL 06 by NEroseman

The rose in U.S. commerce as 'Long John Silver' is likely misidentified. The correct plant, bred from the yellow HT 'Sunburst', bears large, soft yellow buds and very large (4"), open flowers of creamy white with yellow centers, fading silvery white.


Reply #1 of 4 posted 15 AUG 14 by Puns 'n' Roses
The description you're giving somewhat contradicts the findings of the article (see References) "Rosenfarbstoffe aus der Sicht eines Chemikers", where petals where scientifically tested for colour and Long John Silver was of the purest white.
Also, the HMF description states "moderate scent", but what I smelled of Sangerhausen's Long John Silver was one of the stronger scents, comparable in intensity to Sunsprite.
While being no expert, I think you can see differences in bloom form in the photos here on HMF, and also in hue. There is one with warm-white, more open, and one with cold-white, more globular blooms.
I would really want to know which one I get when ordering Long John Silver at a nursery, because I want the Sangerhausen one! A haunting scent, made me come back again to sniff it.
Reply #3 of 4 posted 17 AUG 14 by NEroseman
Well, I still think it likely that most of the plants in commerce are something other than 'LJS', perhaps 'Iceland Queen'. The specimen in my photo is in the collection of the oldest public rose garden in the U.S. It does have a good fragrance.
Reply #4 of 4 posted 17 AUG 14 by Patricia Routley
I've added some references for 'Long John Silver' but could not find anything against the rose in commerce being 'Long John Silver'. ( My mind is outrageously pulling me to 'Colonial White'.) I suspect that the remontancy mentioned for 'Long John Silver' in the 1996 reference was an error. I found no references at all for 'Iceland Queen'. Apparently the Connecticut Garden was opened in 1904. 'Long John Silver' was bred in 1934. Do you have a date when the rose in situ was first planted?
Reply #2 of 4 posted 17 AUG 14 by Nastarana
I take it the rose in your photo, which does show a yellow center, is the correct LJS? Might the impostor be another Horvath rose?
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