HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
DescriptionPhotosLineageAwardsReferencesMember RatingsMember CommentsMember JournalsCuttingsGardensBuy From 
'Rose Edouard' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 94-115
most recent 27 JUL 16 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 27 JUL 16 by Patricia Routley
There are rootstocks used in India and mentioned (in conjunction with 'Rose Edouard') in the references.
In the 1925 ref, page 42 a Persian rose is mentioned, almost single, bright crimson, perfumed and thorny.

In the 1926 ref, p70 R. gigantea (as they call it - see also the 1885 reference), a climber with tiny semi-double pink flowers in clusters and foliage similar to a wichuraiana.

The 1926-70 rose may be a multiflora, but the Persian rose is puzzling me. The best I can come up with is a less petaled version of 'Gruss an Teplitz'?
REPLY
Discussion id : 56-550
most recent 20 FEB 13 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 8 AUG 11 by Cà Berta
In the Catalogue descriptif methodique ….pp. 204-206, Prevost reports, besides ROSE EDWARD, a few ROSA BORBONIANA, Desportes. – R. CANINA BORBONIANA, Thory. – ROSIER DE BOUBON, namely:
n. 806 ROSE EDWARD son nom à l'Ile de France, suivant plusieurs cultivateurs.
n. 807 ROSE DE BOURBON, A FLEUR MULTIPLE – R. DE BOURBON PERPETUELLE, L.
n. 808 ROSE DE BOURBON CARNEE, L.
n. 809 ROSE DE BOURBON A FLEUR PLEINE. - BENGALE NEUMAN, nom de son introducteur. - ROSE DE L'ILE DE FRANCE, Dubreuil. - BENGALE DUBREUIL, V., Cat. 1826.

Besides, in the Supplement Catalogue descriptif ...pp. 22- 24 Prevost reports a few others ROSA BORBONIANA. – ROSIER DU BOURBON:
n. 935 ROSE DE BOURBON A PETALES CRENELES
n. 936 ROSIER DE BOURBON HETEROPHYLLE, L.
and a couple of Hybrides:
n. 937 ATHALIN, L.
n. 938 LAS CASAS, V.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 5 posted 10 AUG 11 by jedmar
Yes, the synonyms shown are not quite correct, as there were probably a few Bourbon roses introduced within a short period by different people, and some grown from seed. The relevant literature is quite confusing and inconsistent. A comparative planting of Bourbons is under way in Germany and may give some answers in a couple of years.
REPLY
Reply #2 of 5 posted 11 AUG 11 by Cà Berta
From the large amount of the scattered references that were collected I realize that a great effort is made to rationalize this issue. My comment intended to contribute by pointing to the existence of a reference “in business” and “close to the time” that already tried to rationalize the knowledge available a few years after the introduction of these roses. It might still be useful although Prevost fils were not infallible!
REPLY
Reply #3 of 5 posted 20 FEB 13 by Sherri Berglund
I am curious; is the Bourbon Rose planting in Germany in a public garden? I plan on visiting Germany in June and have an interest in the early Bourbon roses, if the site would be feasible to visit.
Sherri
REPLY
Reply #4 of 5 posted 20 FEB 13 by jedmar
No, it is private. I will send you a post.
REPLY
Reply #5 of 5 posted 20 FEB 13 by Sherri Berglund
Thank you! I appreciate your help!
Sherri
REPLY
Discussion id : 70-083
most recent 18 FEB 13 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 18 FEB 13 by Vladimír Ježovič
This rose reminds me one of my seedling of Rosa x damascena semperflorens (Autumn Damask).
REPLY
Discussion id : 63-694
most recent 19 APR 12 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 19 APR 12 by CybeRose
The Garden Magazine pp. 253-256 (June 1915)
THE STORY OF THE MODERN ROSE
Ernest H. Wilson, Arnold Arboretum
About 1819, from the Isle of Bourbon, the Rose Edward reached France, and crossed with the French Rose (R. gallica) gave rise to the Hybrid Bourbon Roses. This Rose Edward is of much interest; long ago it was cultivated in Calcutta and it is obviously a Hybrid Chinese. The specimen I have seen strongly suggests R. chinensis x R. centifolia as its parentage.
REPLY
© 2017 HelpMeFind.com