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'Cécile Brunner' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 105-390
most recent 7 SEP HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 7 SEP by Give me caffeine
Nice little rose. However, it is an absolute aphid magnet and is extremely vulnerable to them.

The bush itself will endure, but the very fine pedicels can easily be sucked dry by a bunch of thirsty aphids. The result, of course, is that the buds will die before opening.

If you want this one to look good you'll need to be constantly on the lookout for aphids, and have an effective means of wiping the little mongrels out.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 7 SEP by Patricia Routley
Two fingertips are good. As are the clean birdbaths.
(You had better check out 'Souvenir de St. Anne's too.)
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 7 SEP by Give me caffeine
Two fingertips works, but rapidly gets very tedious.

SdSA is doing fine at the moment.
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Discussion id : 101-019
most recent 18 JUN HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 18 JUN by Patricia Routley
1915 W. E. Lippiatt
p27. Cecile Brunner. Dwarf (Ducher 1881) Bright rose. Yellowish in centre, very sweet.
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Discussion id : 94-305
most recent 9 AUG 16 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 8 AUG 16 by Give me caffeine
This one has just started doing something odd. It's generally free of thorns, but on new canes has recently started putting out a pair of quite large thorns, roughly at 90 degrees to each other, at each stem junction. These are the only thorns on the plant.

I tried to get a decent picture of this, but my $&#^@! camera insisted it wanted to take lovely shots of the mulch in the background. Will have another go tomorrow and see if camera is feeling more cooperative.
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Reply #1 of 12 posted 8 AUG 16 by Jay-Jay
Just take a look at this photo GMC.
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Reply #2 of 12 posted 8 AUG 16 by Give me caffeine
Photo appears to be missing. ;)
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Reply #3 of 12 posted 8 AUG 16 by Jay-Jay
Forgot the URL: Just take a look at this photo GMC. http://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/l.php?l=21.165378
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Reply #4 of 12 posted 8 AUG 16 by Give me caffeine
Similar shape, but as I said they are paired, at around 90 degrees, and only at stem junctions. Will go and try another shot now. It's about time I went and did the morning aphid squash (which is really just an excuse to enjoy the roses).
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Reply #5 of 12 posted 8 AUG 16 by Give me caffeine
Ok, I outsmarted my camera. Check out #286271 and #286272.
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Reply #6 of 12 posted 9 AUG 16 by Patricia Routley
I think they may be fairly normal for' Mlle. Cecile Brunner' - my bush has them too. They are called infrastipular prickles. From my Collins Dictionary - Infra: prefix: below, beneath, after.
stipular: (below the) stipules.
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Reply #7 of 12 posted 9 AUG 16 by Give me caffeine
I see. So "thornless, or almost" means "has two thumping great fangs wherever a new branchy bit starts".

Handy to know, for people who are planning on putting it beside a path. :D

Edit: I think these ones would be infranodal rather than infrastipular. Aint got no stipules near 'em. ;)
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Reply #8 of 12 posted 9 AUG 16 by Patricia Routley
I could be wrong. My botany teacher, Mr. Collins, doesn't tell me about infranodals. But my plant is right by the path and the fangs are no problem at all. The blooms lean out a bit so if you are going to bump into something, you'll bump into a bloom, not a fang.
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Reply #9 of 12 posted 9 AUG 16 by Give me caffeine
Ok cool. That sounds alright then. Mine is next to a path, of course.
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Reply #10 of 12 posted 9 AUG 16 by Jay-Jay
Are those hooked prickles/thorns (or prickles in general) meant/originated just for climbing, or for catching "prey", or some flesh or coat/fur/hair too? To get the necessary decomposition products of those animal or human source particles, to fertilize itself???
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Reply #11 of 12 posted 9 AUG 16 by Give me caffeine
Not sure, but it certainly works for the latter. :D
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Reply #12 of 12 posted 9 AUG 16 by Give me caffeine
I looked again and you're right. Infrastipular they are.
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Discussion id : 94-219
most recent 2 AUG 16 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 2 AUG 16 by Give me caffeine
So my young Cecile (7 weeks in the ground, from bare root) has just popped out its first flower. The description here (and elsewhere, for that matter) says "moderate apple fragrance". My one smells not all all apple-ish and distinctly musky. At least, it does to me. The closest description, for other Aussies who will know what it means, is sort of like musk lifesavers. It's very pleasant, but not a trace of apple.
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