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Discussion id : 7-817
most recent 13 MAR 05 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 12 MAR 05 by The Flower Fancier's Garden
Is straw a good mulch?
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 13 MAR 05 by Anonymous-97434
That depends upon the type of straw you're refering to. Pine straw generally is, as long as it doesn't make your soil too acidic, and you supplement the nitrogen sufficiently to help break it down without the bacteria having to rob it from the plants. Hay generally isn't as it will mold and require too much nitrogen.
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Discussion id : 1-943
most recent 2 JUN 03 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 26 MAY 03 by Jeff Bojanowski
Is one type of bark mulch better for roses then another? How much bark mulch should you use around the base of the rose bush?
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 2 JUN 03 by Unregistered Guest
Roses don't like a cedar mulch as the cedar gives off an oil which harm the roses. 6 inches thick will do if you are in a hot summer zone as roses like to have cool, damp roots.
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Discussion id : 106
most recent 9 JUN 03 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 12 MAR 03 by Unregistered Guest
What materials make good mulch?
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 12 MAR 03 by Alex Sutton
[From Garden Design magazine, June/July 1996, p. 13:] Organic mulches (bark, wood chips, pine needles, leaves, and the like)... add humus to the soil as they decompose, but microbes that perform this transformation draw nitrogen from the soil in the process. This, in turn, causes a deficiency where the mulch meets the soil. Fortunately, deep-rooted trees and shrubs are rarely affected by surface nitrogen depletion. Organic mulch suits them because most have evolved with a natural layer of decaying forest litter or meadow debris... nitrogen deficiency can be a problem with shallow-rooted herbaceous perennials. And some organic mulches -- oak leaves, for example -- release acids or volatile oils that can burn foliage growing near the ground.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 9 JUN 03 by Christy Bowers
I have always used pecan shell mulch on my roses. There doesn't seem to be any negative effect and it doesn't attract the pests the way pine bark does.
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Discussion id : 104
most recent 16 MAY 03 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 12 MAR 03 by Unregistered Guest
What are some of the drawbacks of mulch?
REPLY
Reply #1 of 2 posted 12 MAR 03 by Alex Sutton
[From Garden Desgin magazine, June/July 1996, p. 13:] It may rob the soil of nutrients, prevent water absorption, burn plants, and look absolutely horrid.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 16 MAY 03 by Chel
I have also had problems with mulch encouraging powdery mildew. Also it encourages other fungus.
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