HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
Search PostsPosts By CategoryRecent Posts 
Questions, Answers and Comments by Category
Discussion id : 13-525
most recent 1 AUG 06 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 1 AUG 06 by dhukill

I have started to notice on a couple of new roses that I have planted that  when  the roses get about 3 - 4 weeks old after they have leafed out nicely the leaves dry up turn black and the rose appears to have died.  They all have been warrantied by J and P but i'm not sure if i'm just getting a bad one every now and then or if i'm doing something wrong.


Has anyone else had this problem? 


The roses that have had this problem are Sisters at Heart, Solstace, Tuscan Sun Gemini.


 


Thanks

REPLY
Discussion id : 12-295
most recent 21 MAY 06 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 20 MAY 06 by eliza

hi newby round here...ok...im gonna do it im going to plant roses...done before failed...lil wiser now i hope so going to try again...


my question is....if one rose super star supreme to be particular is susceptable to mildew, and i plant a peace nearby...will this effect peace? ive read in the comments mildew is pretty easy to get rid of but...still i dont want to "cause problem"...wish me luck cuz im scared LOL

REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 21 MAY 06 by Rupert, Kim L.

It seems popular thinking has been that if you plant disease prone varieties, they'll "spread" disease through your garden. My own "theology", based upon twenty-plus years of messing with roses is that disease spores are ever present. They blow on the wind and hitch rides on you and any other human or animal which visits your garden. If you visit another nursery or garden and brush through plants which have disease on them, you'll carry home spores with which to inoculate your garden. Each rose will catch whichever disease when the conditions for that disease are right and the state of the particular rose is proper for it to "get sick". Personally, I avoid disease prone plants of any kind, even if I adore their foliage or flowers. Why increase the risk of a diseased, therefore less pleasant appearing plant in your garden? Each of us has to make our decisions about how much disease is acceptable in our gardens, and what we're willing to do about it. Super Star (Tropicana) and it's sports and quite a few of their offspring are very susceptible to mildew. It's a genetic trait for them to contract the fungus and when everything is right, they'll clutch the spores and proudly display their mildewy leaves. If mildew isn't a problem where you garden, you may not experience it. If that is a probable risk where you are, you may wish to rethink your choice of that rose. Believe me, when the other roses in your garden are clean and one or a few aren't, the affected ones stick out like sore thumbs!


It IS possible a rose can be loaded with disease and the others around it remain clean, for a variety of reasons. But, the diseased plant will never please  you as much as you hoped simply because it will never look healthy, particularly in comparison to those which ARE healthy.


REPLY
Discussion id : 12-260
most recent 17 MAY 06 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 16 MAY 06 by Anonymous-797
I live in Montana and have several roses on the south side of my house.  The rose I have in my flower bed (to the SE of my house) is doing well but the others show no signs of new growth.  Should I be worried yet?
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 17 MAY 06 by Wendy C.

I live in E. WA, and only a few of my roses are growing well. The rest are still waking up, and when you look you can see the new growth under the mulch.


Can you see any green on the canes at all?  If there is green there is hope. Mound them with some kind of compost or mulch and keep them watered. Cut out all of the dead wood if you haven't all ready.


It's really too early to count them out completely. If you aren't seeing any growth by mid-June, then they probably didn't make it through the Winter.  If you have to remove them  take care to get as much of the roots as you can. The rootstock can start to grow years after you've removed the rose.


Best of Luck

REPLY
Discussion id : 1-959
most recent 12 MAY 05 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 29 MAY 03 by Martha Arcuri
How can I start another rose bush from my existing rose bush? Also how do I start another shrub from my existing shrubs? thank you
REPLY
Reply #1 of 9 posted 2 MAR 04 by Unregistered Guest
we have 28 plants in the rose area. we are moving this summer and want to take them, but the new buyer will wnat them. how can we leave the plant in the ground and take a cutting to re plant
REPLY
Reply #3 of 9 posted 6 MAY 05 by Anonymous-797
I am interested in starting roses from existing bushes. I would appreciate any information. Contact me at www.xxxxxxxl@bpsinet.com
REPLY
Reply #5 of 9 posted 6 MAY 05 by Lyn G
We have removed your email address from your post as this will attract spammers. Instead please register on HelpMeFind and record your email address there. It will not be displayed but people can contact you through HelpMeFind and if you like you can still remain anonymous. Site guest can contact you by responding to your posting.

Smiles,

Lyn
helpmefind.com
REPLY
Reply #7 of 9 posted 6 MAY 05 by Hoyt Dottry
Hello,

As for rooting roses and other shrubs, etc. I have a box (like a child's sand box) set-up in a shady spot. In the box, I have a mixture of 75% sand and 25% potting soil.
When I take my cuttings, I make sharp, clean cuts and immediately place them in water. When I have gathered all the cuttings I want, I head to my "rooting box". I then remove the cutting from the water and dip it in "Root Tone". Shake of the excess and poke a hole in the sand with a stick. Place the cutting in the hole and push the sand mixture tight around the buried stem. I then keep them moist. Sometimes if it is hot and dry, I will put a piece of plastic over the cuttings do they stay damp.
Now for the good part. All of the above should be done on the first quarter of the moon. I know it sound odd, but my 90-year-old grandmother gave me that tip and it does work.

I forgot to tell you. Do not let them to get dry. I water mind everyday.

Happy gardening.
Hoyt
REPLY
Reply #8 of 9 posted 11 MAY 05 by Hank Wacker
how can i start a clipping off existing rose bush?
lorhan@redrivernet.com
REPLY
Reply #9 of 9 posted 12 MAY 05 by Lyn G
Many users of the HelpMeFind site ask the same questions as others in the past have asked. We decided to archive the answers to the Questions on the Q & A Forum so that users could get answers quickly rather than waiting for a volunteer to answer your questions.

If you click on the Search Posts tab at the top of the page, you can enter the key word “cuttings” or "rooting" in the search field and all of the answers to questions about “starting roses from cuttings” in our archive will come up. You may be able to get your answer immediately just by reviewing these posts.

If you feel you still haven’t got enough information, please post your question and we will archive the answers to your question, too, for the next user.

Smiles,

Lyn
Helpmefind.com
REPLY
Reply #2 of 9 posted 27 JUL 04 by Hoyt Dottry
Martha,
I know you posted this question several months ago, but I have a 99% success rate when rooting roses. If you are still in need of information, email me and I will be glad to share my technique with you.
Hoyt
xxxx@charter.net
REPLY
Reply #4 of 9 posted 6 MAY 05 by Lyn G
We have removed your email address from your post as this will attract spammers. Instead please register on HelpMeFind and record your email address there. It will not be displayed but people can contact you through HelpMeFind and if you like you can still remain anonymous. Site guest can contact you by responding to your posting.

Smiles,

Lyn
helpmefind.com
REPLY
Reply #6 of 9 posted 6 MAY 05 by Lyn G
HelpMeFind has an excellent article in this month's Ezine about how to start roses from cuttings. Just click on Ezine on the main menu to the left and scroll down to George Mander's article about starting roses from cuttings.

Smiles,

Lyn
helpmefind.com
REPLY
© 2017 HelpMeFind.com