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The Floral Magazine (Jun 1878)  Page(s) Plate 311.  Includes photo(s).
 
Pæonia Moutan 'Elizabeth'.
We are indebted to Messrs. E. G. Henderson and Son, of the Pine Apple Place Nurseries, for the opportunity of figuring this fine Pæony.  It is not exactly new, but it is perhaps the best and freest flowering of the whole list of varieties, of which there are now many in cultivation.

Australian Rose Annual (1952)  Page(s) 13.  
 
Harry H. Hazlewood.  The New Roses of 1952. Gordon Eddie (Eddie, 1949). Large double exhibition blooms produced on vigorous healthy growth. A very fine variety. Colour is variable.

Australian Rose Annual (1952)  Page(s) 13.  
 
Harry H. Hazlewood.  The New Roses of 1952. First Love (Swim, 1950). Long slender shapely semi-double, pale pink blooms with a lilac tint. These lose colour in hot sunlight. Will be good in Autumn or a cool climate. (‘Charlotte Armstrong’ x ‘Show Girl’.)

Australian Rose Annual (1952)  Page(s) 13.  
 
Harry H. Hazlewood.  The New Roses of 1952. Falbalas (Gaujard, 1947). Rather short buds of coppery orange, opening and fading to semi-double, deep flesh pink. 25 petals. Probably better in cooler weather.

Australian Rose Annual (1952)  Page(s) 13.  
 
Harry H. Hazlewood.  The New Roses of 1952. Enchantment (E. G. Hill, 1946). Long pointed bud opening to very large, double, slightly fragrant pink blooms with a yellow base. (‘Mrs. Verschuren’ x ‘Eterna Giovinezza’.)

Australian Rose Annual (1952)  Page(s) 13.  
 
Harry H. Hazlewood.  The New Roses of 1952. Elaine (Robinson, 1950). Deep rose pink of exhibition size and form, born on vigorous growth. There is apparently another ‘Elaine’, described in the 1950 A.R.S. Annual, p. 270.

The Garden (6 Apr 1878)  Page(s) 303.  
 
Tree Pæonies in the Conservatory. — Plants of the Tree Pæony forced into bloom now form attractive objects in the conservatory at Pine-apple Place.  They consist chiefly of plants with a single stem 12 iches to 15 inches high, and surmounted by large heads of blossom.  The variety grown is one named P. arborea Elizabethæ; it bears very large heads of flowers, which are well-formed, very double, and of a bright rosy-pink.  In order to get Pæonies to open their blossoms perfectly little heat must be given until the bloom-buds are visible, when they may be placed near the glass in a warm temperature with every prospect of success.  On account of the attractive character and longevity of the blossoms of the Pæony, they might be grown for conservatory decoration either in the shape of large or small plants to a much greater extent than is at present the case.  Small plants, such as those just described, are among the best subjects for vases in rooms.

Australian Rose Annual (1952)  Page(s) 13.  
 
Harry H. Hazlewood.  The New Roses of 1952. Eden Rose (Meilland, 1950). Rich carmine pink, broad petaled, semi-double blooms freely produced. It is promising very well here.’Mme. A. Meilland’ x ‘Signora Piero Puricelli’.

Australian Rose Annual (1952)  Page(s) 13.  
 
Harry H. Hazlewood.  The New Roses of 1952. Babe Ruth (Howard and Smith, 1950). Very double coral pink with deeper reverse. Blooms are fragrant but not particularly distinctive, while petals ball and damage readily. A feature of this variety is that 5 per cent. from wholesale sales in America will be donated to the Babe Ruth Foundation to fight child cancer.

Australian Rose Annual (1952)  Page(s) 13.  
 
Harry H. Hazlewood.  The New Roses of 1952. Josephine Bruce (Bees, 1949). Large broad petaled blooms of rich crimson. They carry about 25 petals and are slightly fragrant. (‘Crimson Glory’ x ‘Madge Whipp’.) Only very early blooms seen so far, but it is highly spoken of in England.
 
 
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