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'Amboss Funken' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 82-862
most recent 29 JAN 15 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 29 JAN 15 by jmile
Available from - Burlington Rose Nursery
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Discussion id : 82-861
most recent 29 JAN 15 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 29 JAN 15 by jmile
This rose seems to get more vigor and less disease the longer it is in the ground. It is still blooming---it never stopped even in our wet December. What a trooper. It will never have the most beautiful foliage, but its blooms are spectacular.
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Discussion id : 50-721
most recent 11 MAR 13 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 17 DEC 10 by Barden, Paul
Truly one of the worst Hybrid Teas I have ever attempted to grow. Three tries over seven years, each attempt ending in death of the plant. It has no vigor and no disease resistance whatsoever. Don't even THINK about trying to grow it on its own roots. Ugh.
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Reply #1 of 7 posted 19 DEC 10 by Zuzu's Northern California Garden
I agree. I've killed two so far and both were own-root.
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Reply #7 of 7 posted 11 MAR 13 by Dianne's Southwest Idaho Rose Garden
I've killed one as well (own root). I'd try it again if I could get one, though.
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Reply #2 of 7 posted 9 FEB 12 by jmile
This rose really loves the heat. Mine is not own root. My rose is a very strong and vigorous plant---but it is certainly not disease resistant. As one of the articles about it said, it is truly a rose for "a connoisseur". That said I really love this fiery rose. No two blooms are alike. It also has a wonderful fragrance,
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 9 FEB 12 by Margaret Furness
"A rose for a connoisseur"? That sounds like the real-estate agents' euphemism "a renovator's dream".
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Reply #4 of 7 posted 10 FEB 12 by jmile
It is a euphemism for this plant needs spraying for black spot and powdery mildew. When I forget--it suffers. I am in the process of putting flags on those roses that need spraying the most. If they show that they do not need it, I don't spray them.
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Reply #5 of 7 posted 10 FEB 12 by Rupert, Kim L.
Another case of climatic suitability. In the old Newhall garden, it was healthy (hot and arid) and grew vigorously own root. I never sprayed, nor did I need to due to the quite low humidity and frequent higher heat.

If Anvil Sparks isn't healthy or vigorous for you, I'd imagine most of Herb Swim's offerings from the 50s and 60s from the Charlotte Armstrong X Signora line would also be problems.
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Reply #6 of 7 posted 4 NOV 12 by jmile
Well--I have had my plant in the ground for 2 years now. What a difference---The plant is about 5 feet tall and blooms all of the time. It still has its bouts of powdery mildew--- I have found that it does just as well if I do not spray it and just let nature take its course. When it gets hot and dry the plant looks a lot better than when it is cooler. I took a bloom to a rose show even though the leaves were not the greatest. It didn't take any prizes but everyone loved the bloom. It was truly spectacular. it's a keeper for me.
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Discussion id : 42-074
most recent 27 JAN 10 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 27 JAN 10 by Amy's Idaho Rose Garden
I just finally got this last year. It's blooms are amazing and each is individual in it s stripes. My second bloom came just in time for the rose show and I had to take it even though I knew it was stem on stem. It was so amazing I had to share it.
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