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'Trigintipetala' rose Description
'Kazanlik' rose photo
Photo courtesy of Cristina Macleod 'Rose Garden
Availability:
Commercially available
HMF Ratings:
76 favorite votes.  
Average rating: EXCELLENT-.  
ARS:
Deep pink Damask.
Registration name: Kazanlik
Origin:
Bred by Unknown (before 1612).
Introduced in Germany by Dr. Georg Dieck in 1889 as 'Rosa damascena var. trigintipetala'.
Class:
Damask.  
Bloom:
Pink, white undertones, ages to lighter .  Strong, centifolia fragrance.  30 petals.  Average diameter 2".  Medium, double (17-25 petals), in small clusters bloom form.  Occasional repeat later in the season.  Small, glandular sepals, leafy sepals buds.  
Habit:
Armed with thorns / prickles, bushy, well-branched.  Light green foliage.  7 leaflets.  
Height of 5' to 8' (150 to 245 cm).  Width of 4' to 6' (120 to 185 cm).
Growing:
USDA zone 4b through 9b.  Vigorous.  Prune after flowering is finished.  This rose blooms on old wood.  
Breeder's notes:
Bulgaria (Kazanlik region), Turkey (Isparta region)
Ploidy:
Varies - see references
Parentage:
Notes:
'Kazanlik' seems to be the same Damask-type which is also cultivated in Isparta/Turkey and Isfahan/Iran.

Some authorities believe Professeur Emile Perrot is the same as Kazanlik. HMF maintains a separate entry for Professeur Emile Perrot because the two appear to be different varieties to at least two respected rose authorities [GST says that Kazanlik is identical to the rose he received as 'Professeur Emile Perrot', which does not imply that the identification of the latter was correct]..

From "Commercial Reports received at the Foreign Office from Her Majesty's Consuls in 1867", p. 252:
"Report by Mr. Vice-Consul Blunt on Kizanlik and on the Manufacture of Attar of Roses in the Vilayet of Adrianople for the Year 1866. The district of Kizanlik is in the province of Philippopolio, and is included in the vilayet of Adrianople..."

From "Notable Things of our own Time", by John Timbs, 1868, p. 105: "The rose-fields of the vilayet of Adrianople extend over 12,000 or 14,000 acres, and supply by far the most important source of wealth in the district. The season for picking the roses is from the latter part of April to the early part of June...with hundreds of Bulgarian boys and girls gathering the flowers into baskets..."
 
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