HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
DescriptionPhotosLineageAwardsReferencesMember RatingsMember CommentsMember JournalsCuttingsGardensBuy From 
'Pat Austin ™' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 90-781
most recent 11 AUG SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 8 FEB 16
* This post deleted by user *
Reply #1 of 8 posted 8 FEB 16 by Jay-Jay
In colder climates the colours don't fade that fast...
In my opinion You're a bit harsh in Your comment on most of the Austins, but on the other hand, I tend to agree, that a lot are a bit disappointing in "normal" garden-conditions.

But in our climate and on our soil a few do behave very well:
- 'A Shropshire Lad', (The healthiest and very best performing)
- 'Lady of Shallot',
- 'Sharifa Asma' and
- 'Molineux'.
REPLY
Reply #2 of 8 posted 8 FEB 16 by Benaminh
I didn't dismiss ALL the Austins, there are several that I can't live without. However, I'm tired of his marketing campaign and hype. Good older varieties are no longer propagated in favor of new inferior ones, and quite honestly, after all these decades of rose culture and observation, 75% of all his releases are crap for California. I grow roses in western sunset zone #15 clay & #23 sandy loam, both with long growing seasons and some ocean influence -- it's easy to grow plants here. Disregarding Austins' monstrous vegetative growth and disease susceptibility (which has slowly improved each generation), my absolute pet peeve with them is their inability to hold on to their color. His firm has marketed it as a charming feature of English roses. Absolute rubbish. It's a major fault in my book when all his bloody roses fade within a day or two into dirty muddled spotted dishrag shades. No thanks! The quality of his shrubs just can't compare to Kordes.

Yet despite their issues, here is my list of favorite Austins, in my mind their pros outweigh their cons and I will always have them in my garden. Mind you, this list was whittled down through the years after having wasted my resources on other mediocre Austins.

1) Troilus [AUSoil] ...weak vigor, great big flowers
2) Tradescant[AUSdir] ...inconsistent growth, small flowers, good color
3) The Squire ®[AUSquire] ...disease prone, best flowers of all DA's reds
4) The Prince ®[AUSvelvet] ...ungainly growth, good color but blooms burn
5) Spirit Of Freedom[AUSbite] ...good color & form, but flowers sometimes ball
6) St. Cecilia ®[AUSmit] ...blackspot, great form & 2nd best fragrance
7) Scepter'd Isle [AUSland] ...great plant, wish later flower quality was as good as first flush
8) Pretty Jessica [AUSjess] ...small well behaved plant, medium pink color somewhat boring
9) Geoff Hamilton[AUSham] ...small flowers but great improvement over Heritage
10) Fair Bianca ®[AUSca] ...weak vigor & blackspots, but best fragrance of all Austins. Fair Bianca & Felicite Parmentier are my two top favorite rose scents in rosedom.
11) Emily (1992)[AUSburton] ... pretty but difficult to find, very short flower stems
12) Chaucer[AUScer] ...blackspot, nice flowers & pure "myrrh" scent
13) Charles Rennie Mackintosh[AUSren] ...small plant & blackspots, but great flowers & color
14) Charles Darwin [AUSpeet] ...nice mustard yellow, but color fades too fast & borderline rancid fragrance
REPLY
Reply #3 of 8 posted 8 FEB 16 by Jay-Jay
Thank You for Your most appreciated extensive explanation/clarification.
REPLY
Reply #7 of 8 posted 9 JUN by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Benaminh: Really appreciate your taking the time to list which Austin performs best for your soil climate. Which roses in your list are grafted on Dr. Huey, and which ones are own-roots? Thanks in advance.

Regarding what you wrote: " I grow roses in western sunset zone #15 clay & #23 sandy loam." which roses grew in clay, and which ones in sandy loam?? I bought St. Cecelia as own-root and it died this past zone 5a winter in heavy clay, I suspect St. Cecelia prefers sandy loam, and its roots can't handle my gluey & wet clay.

Thank you for any help, it's good to know what type of soil (clay, loam, sandy) is best for which own-root. The pH doesn't matter, since I have acidic rain, as well as alkaline tap water at pH 9 (I can easily fix my tap water with acid-fertilizer).
REPLY
Reply #6 of 8 posted 24 MAY 16 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thank you, Benaminh for a wonderful detailed write-up on Austins. Also Thank you, Jay-jay for your list of Austins. ALL MY 23 VARIETIES of AUSTINS ARE OWN-ROOTS. In my heavy alkaline clay, pH 7.7, own-root Pat Austin loves my wet alkaline clay & partial shade garden. Other excellent bloomers and very healthy OWN-ROOT Austins in my heavy clay, zone 5a: Crown Princess Magareta, Evelyn, Wise Portia, Radio Times, Golden Celebration, Lilian Austin, Mary Magdalene, Queen of Sweden (very healthy), Scepter'd Isle, W.S. 2000, Munstead Wood, and Christopher Marlowe. My garden is organic, no spray. Sharifa Asma is small & healthy & blooms well as own-root.

The WORST performers as OWN-ROOT in my heavy clay are: Eglantyne and Jude the Obscure. Both died in winter. I tried Jude the 4th time, and succeeded by making the soil loamy & fluffier. OWN-ROOT St. Cecilia and William Morris were wimpy even in potting soil, then died later in my clay through the winter. I suspect St. Cecilia and William Morris prefer loamy/sandy soil.

Own-root Charles Darwin didn't like full-sun & stingy so I gave that away. Lady of Shalott as own-root gave only 3 blooms the 1st year, and BIG IMPROVEMENT in 2nd year, with 10+ buds for spring flush. Pat Austin blooms best as own-root in my alkaline clay, fantastic mango and nectarine scent, with glossy & healthy foliage. I started buying own-root Austin in 2011, so they range from 7 to 2 year-old and newly bought in 2017 are: The Squire, The Dark Lady, James Galway.
REPLY
Reply #8 of 8 posted 11 AUG by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thanks, Jay-jay, for your list recommending A.S.L, Lady of Shalott, Sharifa Asma, and Molineux. I tried to buy Molineux this year, but nursery is out. Very happy with Lady of Shalott and Sharifa Asma as OWN-ROOTS ... both are drought-tolerant & healthy & bloom well in my alkaline clay.
REPLY
Reply #9 of 8 posted 11 AUG by Jay-Jay
You're welcome.
REPLY
Reply #4 of 8 posted 9 FEB 16 by Nastarana
'Pat Austin' behaved the same way for me in inland CA, except the color faded to a nasty pink and the comparison I would make cannot be mentioned here. I did very much like Golden Celebration, which did hold its' color. As for Geoff Hamilton, I never saw a blossom on it.
REPLY
Reply #5 of 8 posted 9 FEB 16 by Benaminh
For some reason my initial post got deleted:

Pat Austin in Southern California is stingy with flowers. The beautiful bright colors last almost a day before fading to dirty dishrag Manila yellow. On the second or third day the bloom shatters to nothing. The flower shape isn't even that pretty. The fragrance is insipid, in fact everything about this rose is disappointing and forgettable. Perhaps better suited to a depressing overcast climate, I cannot recommend this rose for locations with 75+F daytime temperatures, even if given afternoon shade. The only half decent rose of David Austin's five releases in 1995 is Jude The Obscure. The other four are complete duds and a waste of money, they should be considered obsolete and boycotted towards extinction.
REPLY
Discussion id : 104-297
most recent 11 AUG HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 AUG by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
As own-root my 1st Pat Austin's blooms fried badly in full-sun, but my 2nd own-root-plant does well in 4 hours of sun for the past 7 years. This rose is a water-hog and best in few hours of morning sun. For comparison of this vs. other OWN-ROOT orange roses, see below link:

https://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/l.php?l=3.23414&tab=32
REPLY
Discussion id : 13-437
most recent 9 JUN SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 24 JUL 06 by MarianWil
I'm new to growing roses and just received a Pat Austin as a gift. Does it bloom on both new and old growth? I live on the East Coast and would like to know when and how to prune it. Thank you.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 3 posted 25 JUL 06 by Rupert, Kim L.
Pat Austin is a modern shrub rose which does bloom on old and new wood. It's pretty much like a floppier Hybrid Tea, or shorter climber. In Southern California, it grows like a pillar rose, a shorter climber. You may prune it harder to keep it more bushy, or you may train it like a climber, shortening the laterals it produces as you would any other climber. Usually, here, the larger you allow it to grow, the more bloom you will have.
REPLY
Reply #3 of 3 posted 9 JUN by mamabotanica
Excellent help! I recently planted a Pat Austin in a spot best for a tall narrow rose so I'll head her in that direction.
Thanks!
REPLY
Reply #2 of 3 posted 25 JUL 06 by Wendy C.

Pat Austin is a delightful shrub. It stays rather small for me. 2.5' x 2'.  You can prune it the same you would a Floribunda. Take the spray stem to the next sound leaf set when it is spent.  My Pat Austin is blooming in triple digit heat. The blooms are small, but that it's blooming in this heat is amazing.


Hope you enjoy your Pat Austin

REPLY
Discussion id : 96-685
most recent 6 JAN SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 3 JAN by Jay-Jay
Look-a-like of Soleil d'Or it's ancestor (several times used in Pat Austin's ancestry).
REPLY
Reply #1 of 3 posted 6 JAN by HMF Admin
Thank you Jay-Jay. Your emails to alert us when there is a problem are much appreciated. We still have a few issues to work out but most of HMF is back now.

Best regards,
HMF Support
REPLY
Reply #2 of 3 posted 6 JAN by Jay-Jay
You're welcome.... So the "Continue" button works correctly again, I notice now.
PS: and the changes in a comment are immediately seen. One doesn't have to refresh the page any-more.
Great!
REPLY
Reply #3 of 3 posted 6 JAN by Jay-Jay
It seems to work properly right now.
REPLY
© 2017 HelpMeFind.com