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"Anna Olivier Bermuda Mystery Rose" Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 103-230
most recent 23 JUL HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 23 JUL by scvirginia
From The Gardeners' Chronicle, October 6, 1888, p.379:
A Plea for Tea and Noisette Roses.
In making a selection of Roses in these days, I would first of all bear in mind that the beginner (and I am not writing for experienced growers) requires Roses that will grow. There are so many vigorous growers now-a-days, of all shades of colour, that a good selection of them will give a grower all that he can desire, even when eliminating some, which, although vigorous, are, from some cause or other, not effective...
Let me advise then the following: Etoile de Lyon, bright sulphur-yellow, perfect in form and vigorous in habit...
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Discussion id : 86-050
most recent 19 JUN 15 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 19 JUN 15 by CybeRose
The Garden vol 55, p. 329 (May 13, 1899)
Rose Etoile de Lyon.—For culture under glass this Rose is held in great esteem. The blossoms may have a ragged appearance on the outside, but they are so double and so perfectly formed that this small defect is easily overlooked. The colour is a clear bright yellow, a shade or two paler than in Marechal Niel or Perle des Jardins. Perhaps it more nearly approaches in colour an old Rose now almost gone out of cultivation, named Coquette de Lyon. The growth of Etoile de Lyon is vigorous, the wood stout, the foliage bold and handsome, but rather addicted to mildew. This is most unfortunate in a Rose that is as hardy as any Tea I know. It is not a success outdoors unless it be upon walls, but no one would regret planting it upon a wall; indeed, this seems the best way to grow such very double Roses as the above, Marie Guillot, Smith's Yellow and a few others, and for preference I would select one with a western aspect! This Rose is much appreciated in the United States, where it is looked upon as being the very finest yellow variety for the garden. One could wish some raiser would introduce a really reliable rich yellow garden Rose suitable for Great Britain.—P.
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Discussion id : 63-797
most recent 23 APR 12 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 22 APR 12 by peachiekean
I got A 'mystery rose' from Rogue Valley Roses last year. I'm wondering if I have an Etoile de Lyon. It's short and one bud takes awhile to open but stays open for over a week before starting to fade. It's the same color as shown on HMF. I realize it's early in the life of this own root, but I'm so curious as to what I might have.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 23 APR 12 by Patricia Routley
Leave some hips to develop and note whether they are glandular or smooth. Also photograph a just-opening bud and pedicel and show us on HelpMeFind. If you are able to buy the 2008 Australian book 'Tea Roses: Old Roses for Warm Gardens', that has an excellent page on how to distinguish 'Etoile de Lyon' - and many other teas.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 23 APR 12 by peachiekean
Patricia,
Thank you! I have that book. I will leave some hips (that's easy enough as it forms only one flower at a time). It's going to help me identify another rose I'm curious about also.
Mary
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Discussion id : 48-325
most recent 23 SEP 10 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 20 SEP 10 by mashamcl
Shouldn't there be a note saying this is Etoile de Lyon?
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 21 SEP 10 by Cass
I've been chastised by those who "see differences," so I await another to stick out her neck and commit to the identification.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 21 SEP 10 by mashamcl
OK. I for one was glad to learn that they might be one and the same because it means there is a West Coast source for it.
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 23 SEP 10 by billy teabag
We had a chance to closely examine this rose in a number of locations in the USA (Texas, Louisiana, New York) and then in many gardens in Bermuda and again at Mottisfont and we were entirely satisfied that "Bermuda Anna Olivier" is the same as the rose we know as 'Etoile de Lyon'.

You do occasionally see other yellow Tea roses in commerce under the name 'Etoile de Lyon' and this might muddy the waters.

There is a very good b&w photo of 'Etoile de Lyon' in the 1913 Biltmore nursery catalogue (p50).
The catalogue has a recent copyright so I cannot add the image to HMF but this may be searchable online for any who are interested to see a 100 year old photo of the rose.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 23 SEP 10 by mashamcl
Thank you for such an informative, clear and conclusive comment.
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