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'Anna Olivier' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 103-658
most recent 30 JUL HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 30 JUL by scvirginia
from Wright's Pictorial Practical Rose Growing, 1902, p.126:
Twenty-five Teas for the Garden
Anna Olivier, white or buff.
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Discussion id : 103-226
most recent 23 JUL HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 23 JUL by scvirginia
From The Gardeners' Chronicle, October 6, 1888, p.379:
A Plea for Tea and Noisette Roses.
In making a selection of Roses in these days, I would first of all bear in mind that the beginner (and I am not writing for experienced growers) requires Roses that will grow. There are so many vigorous growers now-a-days, of all shades of colour, that a good selection of them will give a grower all that he can desire, even when eliminating some, which, although vigorous, are, from some cause or other, not effective...
Let me advise then the following: Anna Ollivier, a beautifully shaped flower, flesh-coloured, with a deeper tinge at the base...
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Discussion id : 48-073
most recent 16 SEP 10 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 13 SEP 10 by Cass
"Schmidt's Buff Giant" has the most remarkable foliage I've seen yet on a Tea.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 15 SEP 10 by billy teabag
Cass - I've posted some extra shots of Anna Olivier, including some scans & photos of leaves.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 15 SEP 10 by Cass
Thanks, Billy. I need to do a petal count with a shot of the petals removed from the bloom and placed right-side up on a plate. When you have bloom, if you do the same, we'll be able to compare the petals in detail. I think the petals are quite large.

I've never seen blooms with coloring as bright as the rose in Oz. Most often the blooms show the creamy apricot-pink in the center and open cream with only a vague notion of color in the center. The shots I posted show the strongest color I've witnessed, and they were taken in the cool early spring. Mid-summer, the blooms are a dirty cream color. The terra cotta blotch, foliage and hips are otherwise a good match. I wonder if I'm losing the brightly colored blooms of early spring to balling. We are afflicted by Western Flower Trips. Is that a pest in Oz? The plant is strong-growing. Teas with greater size sometimes open their blooms better, so I'm hoping for better bloom each spring.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 15 SEP 10 by billy teabag
A good idea to take shots of the petals etc. If we both do a seasonal series we can eventually compare them season by season.
Our plant seems to be making more of those strongly coloured ones as it gets older. It didn't vary this widely when the plant was younger.
The colours change quite quickly too. The unusual dusky pink tones can be there in the morning and gone in the afternoon and the deeper apricot ones tend to fade out quite quickly too.
The foliage IS beautiful. It has a smooth, clean, fresh look about it - and the undercarriage of the bud/ bloom does too. It really is one of the exceptional Teas.
How large is your plant now?

Yes - unfortunately we have thrips - they come as the weather warms up and love the paler blooms.
The petal number of our rose can vary quite widely. Generally less petals in hot weather and more when it forms and opens more slowly in cooler weather.
Do you know whether the old parent plant of "Schmidt's Buff Giant" produces the darker coloured blooms at times?
I'll upload another scan of those strange pale hot weather Anna Olivier blooms - showing the (singed) faces of the bloom.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 15 SEP 10 by Cass
I wish I saw that pale transluscent pink, but I don't. Pale dusty mauve to dirty cream, very much like this but fewer petals. I think your climate is warmer than mine.
http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=21.156848

My plant has hit 5 feet. I'll ask Jackie about the mother plant.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 16 SEP 10 by billy teabag
The colour extremes seen in the pics I've uploaded are definitely the exception rather than the rule, but the longer we grow it, the more interesting things we see. Summers have been hotter, winters colder in recent years and this may explain some of the stranger variations it's thrown up.
You do find mention of a wide range of colours in the earlier literature though.
Henry Moon's portrait from Vol 39 of The Garden (1891) is a great portrait (see photos). He really nailed it.
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