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'Dame Elisabeth Murdoch' rose Description
'Dame Elisabeth Murdoch' rose photo
Photo courtesy of David Elliott
Availability:
Commercially available
Synonyms:
HMF Ratings:
41 favorite votes.  
Average rating: EXCELLENT-.  
ARS:
Yellow blend Hybrid Tea.
Registration name: Korwarpeel
Exhibition name: Speelwark ™
Origin:
Bred by W. Kordes & Sons (Germany, 1999).
Introduced in United States by Wayside Gardens in 2008 as 'Speelwark'.
Class:
Hybrid Tea.  
Bloom:
Yellow and pink.  Flowers peach yellow, fading to reddish.  Strong fragrance.  Average diameter 4.75".  Large, full (26-40 petals), borne mostly solitary bloom form.  Blooms in flushes throughout the season.  Large, pointed buds.  
Habit:
Medium, upright.  Medium, glossy, dark green foliage.  
Height of 3' (90 cm).  
Growing:
USDA zone 7b and warmer.  Can be used for beds and borders, container rose, cut flower or garden.  Disease susceptibility: very disease resistant.  Remove spent blooms to encourage re-bloom.  Spring Pruning: Remove old canes and dead or diseased wood and cut back canes that cross. In warmer climates, cut back the remaining canes by about one-third. In colder areas, you'll probably find you'll have to prune a little more than that.  Requires spring freeze protection (see glossary - Spring freeze protection) .  
Patents:
Australia - Application No: 2001/015  on  2001   VIEW PBR PATENT
Notes:
Dame Elisabeth got her title for her philanthropic works (not for being Rupert Murdoch's mother!), including support of music. She was one of the very early members of the Heritage Rose movement in Australia. She is still involved in the management of her garden, designed 70-odd years ago by Edna Walling, a major Australian designer. The garden is often opened for charity fundraising, and Dame Elisabeth usually greets some of the visitors. She turned 100 in February 2009.
[Thanks to Margaret Furness for this information.]