PhotoComments & Questions 
Duchess of Portland  rose photo courtesy of member Andrew from Dolton
Discussion id : 111-306
most recent 9 JUN 18 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 8 JUN 18 by Michael Garhart
Almost looks like some variations of downy.
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Reply #1 of 10 posted 8 JUN 18 by Andrew from Dolton
It's so much blackspot it has covered the whole leaf, 'Variegata di Bologna' and 'Golden Wings' are just the same.
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 8 JUN 18 by Michael Garhart
I'll trust you word. Hard to tell from a PC screen :D

Golden Wings was a magnificent plant. Had it for 10-15 years, but I got tired of pruning a 10' beast every winter. It always BS'd, but always outgrew it, too. Interesting rose, but just too big and too much work now.
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Reply #3 of 10 posted 8 JUN 18 by Andrew from Dolton
Gosh! It never gets that big in the U.K. In my grandmother's garden near Brighton in south-east England, on chalky very free draining soil in a warm sunny climate by the sea, it grew very happily to about 1.3M, was healthy and flowered well. It really hates my damp climate in the south-west with cool wet summers by being stunted and getting dreadful blackspot and die back.
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Reply #4 of 10 posted 8 JUN 18 by Michael Garhart
I'm in a damp climate, too, but it grew huge here. About 10'T x 8'W. Huge 4" blooms.
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Reply #5 of 10 posted 8 JUN 18 by Andrew from Dolton
Most years I will get a frost in early June or late August, in 2015 there was even one in July. Last year it rained in some shape or form almost every day from July to October.
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Reply #6 of 10 posted 8 JUN 18 by Michael Garhart
That was 2016 and 2017 for us. I thought the rain would never end. Opposite year this winter.

I am not sure why Golden Wings did so well here. We are a low UV area, but it grew very well. Mine was own-root.
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Reply #7 of 10 posted 8 JUN 18 by Andrew from Dolton
I'm in the bottom of a valley too and even on a warm dry night we will still get heavy dews. My plant was grown by David Austin so I guess it was on laxa stock. I could not have chosen a worse place for growing roses! But I have never seen any signs at all of rust or mildew.
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Reply #8 of 10 posted 8 JUN 18 by Patricia Routley
Amdrew, take a look at downy Mildew in the Glossary.
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Reply #9 of 10 posted 8 JUN 18 by Andrew from Dolton
That's interesting, but I never saw any of those dead patches on the leaves. It is starting already this year, I will give it a thorough examination tomorrow.
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Reply #10 of 10 posted 9 JUN 18 by Andrew from Dolton
The leaves on the left are 'Duchess of Portland' whilst those on the right are 'Variegata di Bologna'.
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Discussion id : 104-590
most recent 15 AUG 17 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 15 AUG 17 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thank you, Andrew, for posting honest pictures. My Duchess de Rohan has a few lowest leaves looking like that during hot & dry spell, watered with alkaline-tap-water which zaps out potassium. I notice that with roses in pots, when I give them pH 9 tap-water, lowest leaves become yellowish & with blackspot. Tap-water has chemical QUICK LIME, which zaps out ;potassium (necessary for water-osmosis and fungal-prevention). Quick lime is different from garden-lime, quick lime is an unstable chemical which binds to nutrients, making them unavailable to plants. When plants starve, lowest leaves turn yellowish or blackspot (potassium deficiency). Anti-fungal trace elements (zinc, copper & others) are also zapped out by quick-lime in tap-water.
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