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Patricia Routley
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Initial post yesterday by HubertG
Rose Listing Omission

Marie Louise

"Marie Louise - (Sarter, 1855) (T.) Light blush; a profuse bloomer and strong branching grower; very popular."

From Leedle Floral Co 1914 Fall catalogue, page 28
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Reply #1 of 2 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
I've temporarily put this under 'Alba rosea carnea' (tea, Lartay, 1863). What do you think?
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Reply #2 of 2 posted yesterday by HubertG
I can't find references on the breeder Sarter (or Sartre). It does say it's a tea. Maybe it is a locally bred American tea that simply persisted because of the local demand. It's a mystery.
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Initial post yesterday by HubertG
From J. Steckler's Seeds Co almanac 1905, page 134

"Mme. Derepas Matrat.; Yellow Cochet. A pure Tea rose, very free-growing and hardy in character, withstanding ten degrees below zero. It throws up fine, strong stems, crowned by solitary buds of grand size; the color is a good sulphur-yellow, blooms very large, perfectly double, splendid form and freely produced. It has every quality necessary to make the ideal yellow bedder, ranking with the White and Pink Cochets in value as a Summer rose"
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Reply #1 of 1 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
Thanks HubertG. Added. I have also added the 1914 Leedle ref and they didn't like it much.
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Initial post 2 JAN 16 by Patricia Routley
Thank you so much for adding the 1910 and the two 1911 references Virginia. It is womderful that someone in America can find, AND CONTRIBUTE, these old snippets relating to a Queensland-bred rose. I note 'Souvenir de Therese Levet' has entered the fray in the parentage stakes. Perhaps the Queensland members of Heritage Roses in Australia would enjoy a trip to Charters Towers to peer over fences at old tea roses.
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Reply #1 of 4 posted yesterday by HubertG
From "The Leedle Floral Co." (Springfield, Ohio) 1913 catalogue, page 25:

"Penelope (Williams, 1910.)
Colors unique and beautiful; outer petals at times quite blood red, shading paler towards the center which is primrose-yellow. Large and very full, with an appearance of the Maman Cochet type."

It is marked with as asterisk in the index to indicate that it is a new rose.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
This is the first reference of 'Penelope' in America.
I need to enter Leedle as a publication. Can I have an URL for that issue please HubertG - I can't find it.
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Reply #3 of 4 posted yesterday by HubertG
Sure, this should get you there.

https://archive.org/details/CAT31293961

The catalogues are interesting because this nursery seems to pride themselves on what they claim are accurate descriptions.
Penelope seems to have disappeared from their list by the 1917 catalogue.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
Thanks HubertG. Reference added.
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MemberCalif Sue
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 2 days ago by Lazy Rosarian
Hello:
I am still trying to get cuttings of Grandmere Jenny. Would members of the Coastal Rose Society be willing to sell cuttings to me instead of only selling their cuttings at their auction? I need five cuttings of Grandmere Jenny and will pay $17.00 for each cutting and also pay for shipping. Thank you. Margaret Lamb
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 2 days ago by Patricia Routley
Margaret, we advised you a good while back that this type of comment is better suited as a Private Message, rather than a public Comment.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted yesterday by Kathy Strong's Del Cerro Garden
No we do not sell cuttings. Also, I tried to root a Grandmere Jenny a few months ago, unsuccessfully. It seems to be a hard one to get to take from a cutting, and I have a whole system of misting and lights and when needed, underheat. So I would not recommend what you are trying to do here as it appears you are likely to spend the money and not get your rose.

Also, for those of you that follow California Coastal Rose Society's annual auction of rare roses, our list of roses we will be selling at this year's auction (October 28, 2018) has just been posted at www.ccrsauction.com.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
Could you not just graft it?
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Reply #4 of 5 posted yesterday by Kathy Strong's Del Cerro Garden
I could. But I only had the couple of cuttings that I tried to root from a person who grows it in the desert, and he had asked me to try to start a new plant for him, as his efforts had also been unsuccessful, and that was a sentimental favorite of his. His plant was on last legs when I took what I thought it could spare. And I am usually better at rooting than grafting, which is a whole different skill set.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
I see. It was just a thought because it seemed a difficult rose to root and budding might have been easier.
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