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Margaret Furness
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday by veilchenblau
rootstock?
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Reply #1 of 1 posted yesterday by Margaret Furness
Yeah, could be Dr Huey.
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most recent 4 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 5 days ago by Duchesse
The photos of this rose seem to be completely different colour. Which one would be correct for Austalia please? The dark pink or the cream?
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 5 days ago by Margaret Furness
See Billy's comment of 25 March 2012. What is circulated in Australia under that name would be better called by either of its study names, "Alexandra Pink Tea" (Victoria) or "Isabel Smith" (Rookwood).
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 5 days ago by Patricia Routley
I don’t think ‘Madame de Tartas’ is in Australia. You probably need to have a look at the separate file ‘Madame de Tartas (in Australia)’ (syn “Isabel Smith”) - that rose is a light pink tea with some habits similar to ‘Comtesse de Labarthe’.
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 4 days ago by Duchesse
Madame de Tartas is on the list at Reliable Roses, so I will enquire further to them about the colour of the rose, Thankyou.
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most recent 4 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 8 days ago by Duchesse
As a new rose gardener with 1 acre at my disposal, I am taking note of your clever garden structures Patricia. I have only 1.2m wire fences on all sides, and with this idea of yours I can build my own higher fences/rose support a metre in from the boundary and no need to fuss with neighbours over cost of colourbond fencing.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 7 days ago by Patricia Routley
Clever? Gee.....Cass once called it a corral. But those wide spaces in the mesh allows you to easily prune when needed. Think carefully how you will manage that one metre. Will local laws permit you to build a fence that high?
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 7 days ago by Duchesse
I'll check with council first, but it's rural and neighbours don't use their backyards. 1m or 1.5 will be enough to get the ride on mower up there.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 5 days ago by Margaret Furness
I'd go for 2m (at least), unless you want to keep trimming back and tying up...
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 5 days ago by Patricia Routley
Agree.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 4 days ago by Duchesse
sounds good yes. I already have a Peter Frankenfeld climber that tries to blind me everytime I come round the corner of the shed on the mower........
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most recent 5 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 4 NOV 18 by Patricia Routley
Perhaps 'Malton' (syn 'Fulgens') 1828 should be considered for this foundling.
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 4 NOV 18 by Margaret Furness
Excellent suggestion.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 5 days ago by StefanDC
You might be interested in knowing that the rose found in Australia as "Joan's Pantry" is a dead ringer for one here in the U.S. that I also believe to be the true 'Malton'. The rose here has been sold incorrectly under the name 'Rose Edouard', and I obtained my plant under that name from Rogue Valley Roses. I suspect that a clue to that misidentification may be found on a plant in the San Jose Heritage Rose Garden that was labeled "Lykke's Not R. bourboniana/Rose Edouard", and was donated by Fred Boutin (maybe the "Not" part of that was omitted from some material floating around). You can find photos of this clone here under the listing for R. x borboniana (IDs 144682, 144680, and 144679). The photos and descriptions here of "Joan's Pantry" are completely indistinguishable from the rose that I grow.

Stefan
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 5 days ago by Margaret Furness
Thank you. I have a slight uncertainty about it, in that I would call the flowers on my plant small rather than medium.
It's a pretty thing.
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