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Jay-Jay
most recent 2 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 2 days ago by happymaryellen
Would this rose fair in a pot as a climber? I have one location for a pot gets HOT sun in summer, and another location in soil. Also warm but a but shadier. Sounds likenit like to be moist? But then gets mildew? Any relation? And I am in northern calif by the bay zone 9
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 2 days ago by Jay-Jay
Only when it could root through the bottom of the pot in soil.
Member Ilgiardinodeipigri did so with this rose above a crack in the asphalt or concrete... and it thrives.
Please take a look at his photos of that Zéphirine Drouhin.
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most recent 2 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 31 AUG 13 by bluebuster77
How this rose available in united states?? There are no retailer carry this rose in the states
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Reply #1 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
Currently, there are no US sources, but there have been in the past. It's also quite possible florist stock was propagated and shared from one garden to another. There has been much of that here in California over the past thirty years. There have been many rose society auctions which have distributed an amazing selection of old, rare and unusual roses across the state.
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Reply #2 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by bluebuster77
Excellent info Kim. I think I need to join local rose society, I collected over 100 top rated roses already but not even enough. Thanks
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Reply #3 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
You're welcome. The major upcoming auction is the CCRS Auction in November The information about it is here at this link.

http://www.ccrsauction.com/index.php

There are silent and live auctions on several hundred roses, some of which are not commercially available in the US currently. I think you will really enjoy the archival information available on the site about the past three years' auctions. The Ventura County Rose Society held amazing auctions for several years, all of which were Jim Delahanty's projects. I doubt with his passing, those will continue. The VCRS auctions also had some pretty wild catalogs, which became reference works, particularly for the "found" roses they contain.

The Sacramento Historic Cemetery has their Garden Celebration usually in April Their site is here.

http://www.cemeteryrose.org/

Jeri Jennings has created some wonderful catalogs for their sales which have also become reference works for the old, rare and found roses they contain. These special events can significantly open your eyes to some pretty wonderful roses you may not have been exposed to any other way. You'll enjoy them.
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Reply #4 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by bluebuster77
Thank you very much, I'm heading to Ventura county end of next month. Hope to be there again in November for this rose auction
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Reply #5 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
You're welcome! The VCRS has a propagation demonstration for their November 21 meeting. Burling Leong will demonstrate her chip budding method. Clay Jennings will demo his rooting method and I will demo the "Burrito Method" of wrapping cuttings. The date, time and address are on their web site here.

http://www.venturarose.org/calendar.htm
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Reply #6 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by bluebuster77
I saw on the society calendar. I'm very familiar with burrito method, is this rooting on the main plant without cutting the branches? We been using this method on any kind of tropical plants in south east Asia region. Is this success in roses? Wonderful, I definitely want to see this
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Reply #7 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
What you describe is layering or air layering. This requires removal of the cutting to wrap. I've detailed the process I was introduced to on my blog.

http://pushingtheroseenvelope.blogspot.com/2011/05/wrapping-cuttings.html

Beginning at the above link and reading the successive posts forward will provide you with all the information (including detailed photographs) gleaned to date about the subject. It relies upon some of the same responses as layering, but differs in key points.
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Reply #8 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by bluebuster77
Yes it's new for me and very interesting method of rooting
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Reply #9 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
Once you get the method tweaked to your conditions and climate, it can be a very easy, highly successful method. It's enabled me to root roses in my conditions when nothing else has worked well.
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Reply #10 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by bluebuster77
Very simple and easy, i wrapped few cuttings. Only question on this method is that how to dip in hormone? is it just like normally dipping base of cuttings? Or Entire cutting? Because I saw roots emerge from most of the knots, MAGIC! I used mist box method previously and success is only 10-20%.
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Reply #11 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
Just dip the bottom ends of the cuttings in the hormone of your choice. Some are going to root beautifully without any hormone. Some are going to fight you every step of the way. The hormone is not absolutely required, but it usually couldn't hurt!
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Reply #12 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by bluebuster77
I would think so, I appreciate for sharing new and easy rooting method.
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Reply #13 of 29 posted 31 AUG 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
You're welcome! I hope it proves useful for you.
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Reply #18 of 29 posted 8 SEP 13 by bluebuster77
Kim

You're a magician of propagation. What a great method that prove me reality. This is awesome! I used your method with 6 cuttings, including Vendera florist rose from my mom flower bouquet. Only a week I'm so curious what is going on? I open the burrito and found small young roots are forming 4 out of 6 cuttings, seemingly all are in great shape. Thanks again Kim
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Reply #19 of 29 posted 8 SEP 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
Congratulations! Actually, you must be the "magician". This method doesn't work in my climate this time of year with actively growing cuttings. I only succeed with it here in late winter to early summer with dormant material. Good job! If they are actually rooting, it might be time to plant them. The longer they remain in the wraps without light, the more stored resources they use up. They need light to photosynthesize food for themselves. Now comes the hard part. Planting them where they will receive light without cooking or drying up. You might want to take a look on my blog, paying attention to how deeply I plant them to start so they get some light, but remain cooler, damper and darker to encourage root development until they fill the bottoms of the pots. Good luck!
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Reply #20 of 29 posted 8 SEP 13 by bluebuster77
Do you means grow them in greenhouse condition?
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Reply #21 of 29 posted 8 SEP 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
If you have a green house where you can harden them off and let them mature where they won't fry, that would be great. I don't, so I experimented until I discovered planting them deeply so only the top inch or so of the cutting remained out of the soil where the sun could hit it worked for me here. That has permitted them to begin feeding themselves while the roots continue developing without them drying out and frying when the sun and air are too hot and dry. You'll have to experiment where you are to see what works best for you this time of the year.
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Reply #22 of 29 posted 8 SEP 13 by Jay-Jay
I discovered that some hours early morning sun do the trick, and in the beginning I cover the potted cuttings with a sandwich bag out of thin polypropyleen, held in place by an elastic band. (to keep the cuttings moist)
After a week or so, I make a cut in the plastic bag with a knife and open that slit little by little (to prevent moulding) during the next days, until it can be taken off.
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Reply #23 of 29 posted 8 SEP 13 by Rupert, Kim L.
I would fear covering anything with any kind of plastic here in much of California this time of year. It's too hot and too sunny. It would be like microwaving them in a very short period of time. Where it's cooler in comparison, as it is in your garden in The Netherlands, Jay Jay, absolutely, that should work just fine.
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Reply #14 of 29 posted 1 SEP 13 by Jay-Jay
Maybe is using this natural home-made rooting hormone an idea?
http://deepgreenpermaculture.com/diy-instructions/home-made-plant-rooting-hormone-willow-water/
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Reply #15 of 29 posted 1 SEP 13 by bluebuster77
Very interesting article, I definitely want to try that
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Reply #16 of 29 posted 1 SEP 13 by Jay-Jay
It did work for me at rooting the cuttings of the sport of Mozart, that I became of Maurice Reybaud.
See the comments at this photo: http://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/l.php?l=21.173730&threadID=58112&tab=32
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Reply #17 of 29 posted 1 SEP 13 by bluebuster77
Wonderful propagation. Thanks for sharing!
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Reply #27 of 29 posted 2 days ago by jmile
I got my original Terra Cotta from Carlton Nursery many years ago. I don't know where HMF gets their info but mine is over 6 feet tall.
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Reply #28 of 29 posted 2 days ago by Rupert, Kim L.
Help Me Find obtains information from official ARS publications as well as from the rose breeder and introducers. Other information comes from those who grow the roses, such as your comment.
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Reply #29 of 29 posted 2 days ago by jedmar
6-8 feet is very unusual for this type of HT. Sounds almost like a climbing sport. Would be good to get the opinion of Mathias Meilland.
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Reply #24 of 29 posted 2 NOV 17 by jmile
If you are still looking for Terra Cotta----I have sent some cuttings to K and M Roses to be grafted onto Fortuniana root stock. According to Jim Mills, these cuttings are doing great. They have been hardened and are being transfered into 1 gallon pots. If you would just like cuttings to start own root, I will send you cuttings. My Terra Cotta is a beast. It is 8 feet tall and it blooms all the time. The blooms are huge. Most of them are huge sprays.
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Reply #25 of 29 posted 2 NOV 17 by bluebuster77
Interested.
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Reply #26 of 29 posted 23 AUG 19 by jmile
Are you still looking for Terracotta? I have several ---- It is a very healthy monster of a rose. I love the color in my garden. It is next to Out of Africa. They make quite a duo.
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most recent 3 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 5 days ago by smashzen
For those of you who has the climbing version, what's the average maximum heigh? do you thing I could cover a pergola?
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Reply #1 of 6 posted 4 days ago by Jay-Jay
Is there a climbing version? The Lady her-selves isn't that vigorous, to be able to cover a pergola in my opinion/experience.
Some other Austins are. Both suitable as a shrub and as respectable climbers.
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Reply #2 of 6 posted 4 days ago by smashzen
yep, it is sold only in warmer countries (I guess is the regular LadyOS that performs as a small climber in a warmer climate), anyway the DA website states her as a "small climber" with a 250cm height, just trying to figure out from personal experience if the average heigh is approximately the same as DA website.
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Reply #3 of 6 posted 4 days ago by Marlorena
Here in England.. approx zone 8..it's grown as either a medium shrub about 5 feet or very large shrub to 10-12 feet, especially against a wall or trellis.. according to conditions, and requirements.... the structure takes the rose upwards..
Because of its rather stiff nature, upright growth which can be fan trained, I would doubt its suitability for a pergola, except against the upright posts.. if I wanted a rose for across the top of a pergola, I'd want one that hangs its blooms somewhat downwards... LoS has outward or upward facing blooms mostly..
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Reply #4 of 6 posted 3 days ago by Jay-Jay
Marlorena,
Abraham Darby is very apt to cover a pergola, with its neighing heads and long flexible canes. Flowered repeatedly and abundantly the last 3 years from 1/2 April till the frosts kick(ed) in.
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Reply #5 of 6 posted 3 days ago by Marlorena
..it has a good scent too doesn't it Jay-Jay?.. I've only sniffed it once and I thought it was nice... good to know that information.. I'm up to my neck in roses right now, but it's one I keep meaning to try... not easy to find here these days.. Abraham Darby that is..
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Reply #6 of 6 posted 3 days ago by Jay-Jay
It has a very good scent. Strong rose/citrus. Harmonious.
We wrote about Abraham Darby earlier Marlorena. When not sold in Britain... it's relatively easy to propagate from cuttings or by oculation/bud-grafting on a rootstock.
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most recent 3 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 5 days ago by Jay-Jay
I can see in this photo, of which rose Sutter's Gold (Cl.) got its appearance!
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 3 days ago by petera
Exactly, you can follow the lines through the 1920s and 30s as the Pernetianas were merged with the Ophelia descendants. The shiny leaves, thin, red stems and big prickles carry through, occasionally skipping a generation, but then appearing again in later plants like Sutter's Gold. I have enough of these HTs now that I can see what Pernet and the other breeders were working to achieve -- the refined elegance of Ophelia with the colour from Rosa foetida -- culminating in Peace.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 3 days ago by Jay-Jay
I wouldn't say culminate, for Peace was a big disappointment for me.
Whilst Sutter's Gold Cl. is an everlasting joy! For the eyes as well as for the nose!
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 3 days ago by Jay-Jay
PS: Very nice photo by the way!
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