HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
Member
Profile
PhotosFavoritesCommentsJournalCuttings 
HubertG
most recent 6 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 6 days ago by HubertG
The roses at the top and centre here are clearly the same specimens used in the 1925 American Rose Annual photo, except their positions have been reversed. It's interesting to see how these photographic images were manipulated like that in that era.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 6 days ago by Patricia Routley
I will respond further in the Comments.
REPLY
most recent 10 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 10 days ago by HubertG
Is this Swim and Weeks' rose 'Paloma' that has been mislabelled by the garden or Tantau's floribunda 'La Paloma' that has been uploaded to the wrong file? I can't really tell looking at David Elliott's other photos but I think it's the floribunda.
REPLY
most recent 11 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 12 days ago
* This post deleted by user *
Reply #1 of 6 posted 12 days ago by jedmar
Misspelling by a French nursery. However, even native English Speakers have Trouble with the Apostrophe. See the books "Apostrophe Catastrophe" or "The accidental Apostrophe"
REPLY
Reply #2 of 6 posted 12 days ago by Margaret Furness
But the breeder was American. Did he have no right of control over the rose's name?
Another good book - and very funny - is "Eats, shoots and leaves", by Lynne Truss.
REPLY
Reply #3 of 6 posted 12 days ago by HubertG
Maybe the rose belongs to Coral Pin and she just wants to make sure you know, lol.
REPLY
Reply #4 of 6 posted 12 days ago by Margaret Furness
Ooh, you could write a saga about her life...
REPLY
Reply #5 of 6 posted 12 days ago by HubertG
... if we knew who she was ... ;-)
REPLY
Reply #7 of 6 posted 11 days ago by Margaret Furness
Coral Pin
Took us all in.
Nobody knows
Why she'd have a rose.
We can't make it out.
What shows beyond doubt
That it has to be?
The apostrophe.
REPLY
Reply #6 of 6 posted 11 days ago by jedmar
Yes, I read that one. Very funny!
REPLY
most recent 12 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 12 days ago by HubertG
I wasn't sure where to put this and thought this might be the best place.

In Peter Lambert's 1934-35 catalogue on page 43 under the Rosa Gigantea section there is a rose listed called 'Soeur Amic'. One would naturally think that this is a error for 'Senateur Amic' but its breeder is given as Levavasseur as follows:

"Soeur Amic (Levavasseur). (Schnitt lang)."

That's the only description. It's also listed in the index as 'Soeur Amic'.
In Lambert's 1938-39 catalogue it is listed in the Rosa Gigantea section on page 36 as 'Soeur Amié' with the following description:

"Soeur Amié (Levavasseur). (Schnitt lang), gefüllt, lachsgelb."

which means double and salmon-yellow. In the index it appears as 'Soeur Amic'.
In the 2nd edition (1942) of 'Standardized Plant Names' under Roses there is an entry for "Soeur Amic HG. (Lev.)" and no entry for 'Senateur Amic'.

So I don't know whether being a Hybrid Gigantea it is a mistake for 'Senateur Amic', or because the description is not like 'Senateur Amic' that it is in fact a different rose by Levavasseur.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 2 posted 12 days ago by jedmar
Added as a separate rose for the time being. The nursery Levavasseur & Cie still existed in the 1930s, although it might not have been Ernest Levavasseur. There are catalogues of the nursery from the period, but could not yet access one.
REPLY
Reply #2 of 2 posted 12 days ago by HubertG
Thanks. It's peculiar.
REPLY
© 2020 HelpMeFind.com