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AndromedaSea
most recent 29 JAN HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 29 JAN by AndromedaSea
I ordered Raspberry Sundae and received Top Brass. Although this was not the peony I ordered, I’m very happy with it. It has a wonderful fragrance, and strong stems that hold up its upright blooms. The plant is incredibly healthy, tall and strong. I planted this bareroot peony in spring of 2020, and it bloomed in spring of 2021. The leaves stayed green until they died back in fall. This peony was in a spot where it had full sun in spring, and then partial sun (about 5 hours a day) in high summer. I’m in zone 7a, NJ.
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most recent 29 JAN HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 29 JAN by AndromedaSea
Lady Alexandra Duff is a very vigorous grower in my zone 7a garden. My soil is heavy clay, but has been amended over the years. I planted this peony and 3 others in spring of 2020. I was told not to expect blooms for two years, but I got a very modest flush of blooms a month after planting the root in the ground. Last year, the foliage was much larger and I had over 20 blooms-not bad for such a young plant. The sent is lovely, and the foliage stayed nice and lush until it died back in the late fall. I know I’m supposed to pinch off the side bugs for larger blooms, but I just can’t bring myself to do that.
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most recent 21 JAN HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 21 JAN by AndromedaSea
This rose is really pretty. I garden in compacted clay soil in zone 7a. I don’t really have any negatives about this rose. It’s just solid. I’m in the northeast where black spot is nearly inevitable. This rose for a few spots but that was it. It’s not a particularly vigorous grower, but I like that it didn’t outgrow its spot the first year. I would have liked more fragrance, but the bees liked it fine. It wasn’t a huge target for Japanese beetles, or aphids. It’s just an easy, easy rose.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 21 JAN by 1
What is the plant architecture like? I almost bought it, but the photos gave me the impression that it was linear and thin. And what do you think relative height will be like?
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Reply #2 of 1 posted 23 JAN by AndromedaSea
I think it has a really nice habit. It’s not too twiggy, and not at all sparse. Pretty much a typical grandiflora, I think. It’s not especially leggy, and it didn’t throw out octapus canes at all. The leaves are lovely and it’s not an eyesore when it isn’t flowering. The site where I bought it said that it was going to grow to 5’. It’s 3’-3.5’ tall now after the first year, and about 2’ wide. Show Your Stripes was in more shade than my Strike it Rich, and didn’t get as tall the first year, but it has a less scraggly shape. It’s just a very pleasant rose.
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most recent 21 JAN HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 21 JAN by AndromedaSea
Does anyone have a Peach Swirl that doesn’t have Mosaic virus? Will the RMV eventually kill my rose? This is one of the most vigorous growers in my garden, and seems to have good black spot resistance (a very good thing here on the east coast!). This rose, even with RMV, wasn’t badly affected by black spot and didn’t seem to mind the few spots it did get. It put out several flushes of flowers, and was one of the most floriferous roses in my garden. It powered through the spotted lanterfly infestation in my county (the nymphs love tender new growth, and Peach Swirl is very vigorous), seemed untroubled by my compacted, heavy clay soil, and seemed absolutely fine with the extra waterings it got (from an overhead sprinkler!) because it’s next to the vegetable garden. Heat and humidity didn’t seem to bother it; it just kept putting out beautiful healthy, fast-growing basals — with mottled RMV leaves. Rain doesn’t ruin the flowers, the Japanese beetles were all too busy enjoying my “Strike it Rich” to bother Peach Swirl. It seems ok with cold, too. It was one of my last roses to flower last fall, and the leaves are still looking pretty good now (we’ve had rain, snow and sleet several days in the past few weeks).

If this rose dies from RMV, I’ll definitely want another one to replace it with. It really brightens up the area. The flowers are fragrant in my garden, and so beautiful. The fall flush, especially, was amazing. I didn’t know what RMV was when I brought this rose home, but I’m definitely happy to give it garden space because it really is a fantastic rose.
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Reply #1 of 0 posted 22 JAN by StefanDC
Don't worry about RMV killing your rose--it's not lethal, and often has only a mild impact on the rose's performance, but it is too bad that the rose hasn't been propagated in a more conscientious way. In this day and age, there is no excuse for new introductions to be infected with RMV.
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