HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
Member
Profile
PhotosFavoritesCommentsJournalCuttingsMember
Garden
Garden
Listing
 
AnitaSacramento
most recent 16 SEP 19 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 16 SEP 19 by AnitaSacramento
Romaggi Plot Bourbon is a small plant. Definitely not Mlle Blanche Lafitte, which is 5-6 ft tall.
REPLY
most recent 15 SEP 19 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 15 SEP 19 by AnitaSacramento
This rose was sold to us as "Mableton Agrippina" by Vintage Gardens about ten years ago. It has remained about three feet high and wide in the Sacramento Historic Rose Garden. Please add this name as one of the synonyms for this plant.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 15 SEP 19 by Patricia Routley
Anita, why do you think it is necessary to add yet another study name when the rose has been identified. Vintage were listing the rose as “Mableton Crimson China” back in 2001 and 2006 - see references.
REPLY
most recent 6 JAN 19 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 20 JUL 16 by AquaEyes
There is some interesting news for 'Hermosa'. It seems that a recent genetic study has identified more than one individual is going around under this name, even though to our eyes essentially similar enough to seem identical. This reminded me of something I read in "The Graham Stuart Thomas Rose Book" from 1994. In the back, he included some writings of Dr. C. C. Hurst. On page 313, Dr. Hurst begins a discussion about the Bourbons. On the following page (314) was this bit:

"...Although from the first the Bourbon was a distinct type of Rose with its stout prickly stems, vivid rose-colored flowers with rounded imbricated petals and broad leathery leaves, various breaks occurred from time to time through segregation as well as through hybridization. Between 1834 and 1841 the China reversion 'Hermosa' appeared independently with four different breeders, and it is unlikely that all these were due to a China back-cross...."

Essentially, he posited that as Bourbons self-seeded, China characteristics sometimes emerged predominantly, resulting in a sort of "throwback" to 'Old Blush'. The result would be a very China-like rose, perhaps a bit more robust with its dash of Bourbon. This is also likely what "Sophie's Perpetual" is -- a China-reversion from Bourbon breeding. But in any case, this could explain why named plants of 'Hermosa' today are not all genetically identical.

:-)

~Christopher
REPLY
Reply #1 of 8 posted 20 JUL 16 by Give me caffeine
Fascinating. Do you have a link to the recent study?
REPLY
Reply #2 of 8 posted 20 JUL 16 by AquaEyes
Apparently the article referencing the study is in the American Rose magazine issue which came out this month (July 2016). I have not read it, but I have seen discussion of it, and that triggered my memory of the passage I typed out above.

:-)

~Christopher
REPLY
Reply #3 of 8 posted 6 JAN 19 by AnitaSacramento
The DNA study showed that all Hermosa plants tested were genetically identical, despite apparent differences in plants grown in the Sacramento Historic Rose Garden.
REPLY
Reply #4 of 8 posted 6 JAN 19 by AquaEyes
Do you have access to the article? I never got to read it. I wonder, then, what became of the different roses called 'Hermosa'.

:-)

~Christopher
REPLY
Reply #5 of 8 posted 6 JAN 19 by AnitaSacramento
I will look for the article. I don't recall what it says about Hermosa specifically but Fred Boutin told me the tests showed all to be the same. We have about nine different Hermosa plants that came to the cemetery garden under many different names. Some seem a bit more twiggy and China like and some seem a bit more robust and Bourbon-like. It's possible that all of the ones out here in Northern California are clones from the same line and just show variation. Interestingly, we had a seedling in the garden not far from one of the Hermosas and it looked identical. We have lost it and didn't include it in the study.
REPLY
Reply #6 of 8 posted 6 JAN 19 by AquaEyes
I'm just wondering if the 2016 article is the same as the one Fred Boutin is referencing. If they're not the same, maybe the other article used different 'Hermosa' accessions than those from the cemetery.

:-)

~Christopher
REPLY
Reply #7 of 8 posted 6 JAN 19 by Andrew from Dolton
Is it possible they could be sports?
REPLY
Reply #8 of 8 posted 6 JAN 19 by AnitaSacramento
The roses in the article are the ones that Fred mentions - they came from the Sacramento Historic Rose Garden.
REPLY
most recent 16 DEC 18 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 16 DEC 18 by AnitaSacramento
Testing this feature
REPLY
© 2021 HelpMeFind.com