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'Alba Meidiland ™' rose Description
'Alba Meidiland ™' rose photo
Photo courtesy of Beatrice Lukas
Commercially available
HMF Ratings:
92 favorite votes.  
Average rating: EXCELLENT.  
White, near white or white blend Shrub.
Registration name: MEIflopan
Bred by Marie-Louise (Louisette) Meilland (France, 1986).
White.  None / no fragrance.  50 to 55 petals.  Average diameter 1.5".  Small, very full (41+ petals), cluster-flowered, in small clusters, in large clusters bloom form.  Prolific, continuous (perpetual) bloom throughout the season.  
Medium, spreading.  Medium, glossy, dark green, dense foliage.  
Height of 2' to 5' (60 to 150 cm).  Width of 4' to 7' (120 to 215 cm).
USDA zone 4b through 9b.  Can be used for beds and borders, cut flower, garden or ground cover.  Vigorous.  flowers drop off cleanly.  shade tolerant.  Disease susceptibility: very disease resistant.  
Australia - Application No: 1991/076  on  21 Aug 1991   VIEW PBR PATENT
Synonym: Alba Meidiland. Applicant: Meilland International. Patent has Expired
United States - Patent No: PP 6,891  on  4 Jul 1989   VIEW USPTO PATENT
Application  on  28 Apr 1988
'Meifloplan' Bred by Marie-Louise Meilland, Rosa sempervirens X Marthe Carron. Patent has expired
Wayside Gardens says Alba Meidiland is a great improvement over 'White Meidiland' because it self-cleans its old blooms...

An anonymous testimonial: About ten years ago I bought an 'Alba Meidiland' as a ground cover rose. It has, at times, completely blanketed a neighbor's mature Mock Orange and Vitex, with thousands of blooms. After a severe storm, I cut the entire area back and discovered the 'Alba' had self-rooted in numerous areas. I gave away most of the new plants--all as sturdy and floriferous as their parent--and have attempted to keep the remaining plants closer to the ground where, theoretically, they belong. It's a losing battle, I'm afraid, for although they continue to bloom reliably and freely, they appear to want nothing more than to blanket the tops of everything around. Beautiful, yes; reliable, certainly; healthy, definitely; vigorous, an understatement!

One of the Roses that "passed the test" in Longwood Garden's Ten-Year Rose Trials.