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'Gypsy' rose Description
'Gypsy (hybrid tea, Swim & Weeks, 1972)' rose photo
Photo courtesy of Bob Bauer's Salt Lake City Rose Garden
Availability:
Commercially available
HMF Ratings:
18 favorite votes.  
Average rating: GOOD+.  
ARS:
Orange or orange-red Hybrid Tea.
Registration name: Gypsy
Exhibition name: Gypsy
Origin:
Bred by Swim & Weeks (United States, 1972).
Introduced in United States by Conard-Pyle (Star Roses) as 'Gypsy'.
Introduced in Australia by Roy H. Rumsey Pty. Ltd. in 1976 as 'Gypsy'.
Class:
Hybrid Tea.  
Bloom:
Orange or orange-red.  Mild, spice fragrance.  Average diameter 4".  Large, full (26-40 petals), high-centered to cupped bloom form.  Blooms in flushes throughout the season.  
Habit:
Tall, upright, well-branched.  Large, semi-glossy, dark green foliage.  
Height of 4' to 5' (120 to 150 cm).  
Growing:
USDA zone 7b through 10b.  Can be used for cut flower or garden.  Vigorous.  flowers drop off cleanly.  heat tolerant.  Disease susceptibility: disease resistant, very mildew resistant.  Spring Pruning: Remove old canes and dead or diseased wood and cut back canes that cross. In warmer climates, cut back the remaining canes by about one-third. In colder areas, you'll probably find you'll have to prune a little more than that.  Requires spring freeze protection (see glossary - Spring freeze protection) .  
Patents:
United States - Patent No: PP 3,163  on  May 1972   VIEW USPTO PATENT
The present invention relates to a new and distinct variety of rose plant of the hybrid tea class, which was originated by us by crossing an unnamed and unpatented rose seedling derived from a cross of ['Happiness' (Plant Patent No. 911) x 'Chrysler Imperial' (Plant Patent No. 1,167] x 'El Capitan' (Plant Patent No. 1,796), with the variety 'Comanche' Plant Patent No. 2,855 ), said unnamed seedling being the seed parent and 'Comanche' being the pollen parent.
Notes:
Slightly different parentages given in the registration and the patent.