HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
BookPlants ReferencedPhotosReviews & CommentsRatings 
Climbing Roses (Stevens, 1933)
(1933)  Page(s) 158.  
 
ANEMONENROSE (Anemone). J. C. Schmidt, 1896, A single, pink-flowered hybrid between the Cherokee rose and a Tea. Useful in the South.
(1933)  Page(s) 158.  
 
Antoinette Massard. P. Nabonnand, 1913. Strong-growing Noisette with carmine flowers, shaded vermilion.
(1933)  Page(s) 158.  
 
‘Apeles Mestres’ Simon Dot, 1926. Hybrid Tea. Remarkable for gigantic, very double, bright yellow flowers which alas, are only sparingly produced. The plant is a mean grower but well worth coddling.
(1933)  Page(s) 158.  
 
APPLE BLOSSOM. Cooling 1906. Hybrid Tea with pale pink flowers.
(1933)  Page(s) 158.  
 
APPLE BLOSSOM. L. Burbank, 1932. Apparently a Multiflora of the common type, with large clusters of single, salmon-pink flowers.
(1933)  Page(s) 158.  
 
Arcadia. M. H. walsh, 1913. One of the many good bright red cluster-flowering Wichuraianas swamped by the ballyhoo for Excelsa.
 
(1933)  Page(s) 161.  
 
ARNDT. P. Lambert, 1913. One of the best Lambertianas. Large, loose clusters of reddish yellow buds and pretty salmon-pink flowers. Fairly constant bloomer.
(1933)  Page(s) 161.  
 
AUGUSTE KORDES. W. Kordes Sohne, 1928. Climbing sport of the Polyantha, Lafayette. Flowers two inches across, nearly single, ruffled, and bright rosy crimson. A fair autumn bloomer.
(1933)  Page(s) 161.  
 
Auguste roussel. Barbier & Cie., 1913. Derived from R. macrophylla. A great shrub twelve to fifteen feet high, with clusters of big, semi-double, pink flowers.
(1933)  Page(s) 161.  
 
AURELIEN IGOULT. M. Igoult, 1924. Multiflora. Another of the many attempts to achieve a blue rose. The violet-tinted flowers have a reddish tone.
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